Tracking the Future
45.6K views | +2 today
Follow
Tracking the Future
Explore the most important technology and science trends! News, Analysis, Interviews, Presentations, Documentaries. All in one place at Tracking the future magazine
Curated by Szabolcs Kósa
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Keynote, Andrew Hessel - Cyber Summit 2012

Andrew Hessel is a future-oriented catalyst in biological technologies. In his keynote, he captured the audiences attention with a look into the future of biotechnologies and their (soon to come) impact on society.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Peter Diamandis - Achieving Innovation & Breakthroughs

Companies cannot remain stagnant.They must evolve or they will die... a TEDx talk fom Peter H. Diamandis

 

Peter H. Diamandis is an American engineer, physician and entrepreneur best known for being the founder and chairman of the X PRIZE Foundation, the co-founder and chairman of Singularity University and the co-author of the New York Times bestseller Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Warp drive looks more promising than ever in recent NASA studies

Warp drive looks more promising than ever in recent NASA studies | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The first steps towards interstellar travel have been taken, but the stars are very far away. Voyager 1 is about 17 light-hours distant from Earth and is traveling with a velocity of 0.006 percent of light speed, meaning it will take about 17,000 years to travel one light-year. Fortunately, the elusive "warp drive" now appears to be evolving past difficulties with new theoretical advances and a NASA test rig under development to measure artificially generated warping of space-time.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

New project aims to upload a honey bee's brain into a flying insectobot by 2015

New project aims to upload a honey bee's brain into a flying insectobot by 2015 | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Every once in a while, there's news which reminds us that we're living in the age of accelerating change. This is one of those times: A new project has been announced in which scientists at the Universities of Sheffield and Sussex are hoping to create the first accurate computer simulation of a honey bee brain — and then upload it into an autonomous flying robot.

This is obviously a huge win for science — but it could also save the world. The researchers hope a robotic insect could supplement or replace the shrinking population of honey bees that pollinate essential plant life.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

How synthetic biology will change us

How synthetic biology will change us | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

In the future, genetically modified organisms could be making our medicines, our fuel, our housewares, our houses — and they could even help us remake ourselves. All that may sound like science-fiction, but the future is already arriving, in the form of the bioplastic bottle you may be holding in your hand. Harvard geneticist George Church lays it all out in a new book, "Regenesis: How Synthetic Biology Will Reinvent Nature and Ourselves," written with Ed Regis.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Can We Bring Back the Wilderness?

Can We Bring Back the Wilderness? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Once a rainforest is gone, it’s gone forever, right? Not necessarily. Katherine Rowland surveys the brave new world of restoration ecology: the art of breathing new life into dying lands.

Ever since Aldo Leopold warned of a world irrevocably diminished by human appetite, conservationists have urged that we “act now, before it’s too late”. But what if nature’s end was not a foregone conclusion? Imagine if we could recreate lost rivers, meadows, rainforests even…

A few years back this would have been wishful thinking. But the science of restoration ecology is a fast moving one. Across the globe, from the Aral Sea to the arid Sahel, ambitious programmes to revive and recreate degraded ecosystems are challenging the assumption that once destroyed, nature is gone for good.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Ben Goertzel on Open Cog - Building Better Minds Together

No challenge today is more important than creating beneficial artificial general intelligence (AGI), with broad capabilities at the human level and ultimately beyond. OpenCog is an open-source software initiative aimed at directly confronting that challenge.

 

http://opencog.org

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

The cities of the future will be grown, not built

The cities of the future will be grown, not built | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The cities of the future will have waste-to-energy plants, not shopping malls or churches, at their centre, according to urban designer Mitchell Joachim of Terreform ONE.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

What our civilization needs is a billion-year plan

What our civilization needs is a billion-year plan | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

It isn’t enough just to plan for two or 20, or even the fabled Chinese 100 year periods. We need to be thinking and planning on the order of billions of years. Our civilization needs inter-generational plans and goals that span as far out as we can forecast significant events.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Farm Forward

How will technology change farming in the future? The only certainty is that technology will continue to change how we farm. John Deere offers one vision on how farmers might control their operations in the future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Fusion Energy: One Step Closer to Breaking Even

Fusion Energy: One Step Closer to Breaking Even | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

In the high-stakes race to realize fusion energy, a smaller lab may be putting the squeeze on the big boys. Worldwide efforts to harness fusion—the power source of the sun and stars—for energy on Earth currently focus on two multibillion dollar facilities: the ITER fusion reactor in France and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in California. But other, cheaper approaches exist—and one of them may have a chance to be the first to reach “break-even,” a key milestone in which a process produces more energy than needed to trigger the fusion reaction.

Researchers at the Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico, will announce in a Physical Review Letters (PRL) paper accepted for publication that their process, known as magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) and first proposed 2 years ago, has passed the first of three tests, putting it on track for an attempt at the coveted break-even. Tests of the remaining components of the process will continue next year, and the team expects to take its first shot at fusion before the end of 2013.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Single-atom writer a landmark for quantum computing

Single-atom writer a landmark for quantum computing | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

A research team led by Australian engineers has created the first working quantum bit based on a single atom in silicon, opening the way to ultra-powerful quantum computers of the future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Ray Kurzweil at DEMOfall 2012

Well-known author, entrepreneur and futurist Ray Kurzweil talks about mapping the human brain, the continuing evolution of technology and continued rise of artificial intelligence from the DEMOfall 2012 show in Santa Clara, Calif.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

The Extremely Personal Computer: The Digital Future of Mental Health

The Extremely Personal Computer: The Digital Future of Mental Health | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

It's 2018, and you're not feeling your best. Yesterday, on the phone with Comcast, you forgot your social security number, and had to call your mom to get it. She grew concerned. Your nightstand is full of half-finished novels, because it's easier to start fresh than to keep track of where you left off. And the fatigue -- last Thursday, you slept clear through your alarm, until Agnes in 8J pounded on your ceiling with a basketball. You've been here before; you know you're depressed. And you know what you have to do.

You fire up your PC and dig out your biomonitor wrist strap. "Welcome back, kiddo," Regina, your therapist avatar, greets you. Regina has shiny red hair and glasses, and the Australian accent of a Bond girl. "Let's catch up."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Space: the new cyber crime frontier

Space: the new cyber crime frontier | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

It sounds like the imaginings of science fiction writers. However cyber experts warned yesterday that hackers could send the world back to the 1960s by hijacking satellites dotted around space, creating havoc below.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Artificial intelligence - Creative blocks

Artificial intelligence - Creative blocks | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

It is uncontroversial that the human brain has capabilities that are, in some respects, far superior to those of all other known objects in the cosmos. It is the only kind of object capable of understanding that the cosmos is even there, or why there are infinitely many prime numbers, or that apples fall because of the curvature of space-time, or that obeying its own inborn instincts can be morally wrong, or that it itself exists. Nor are its unique abilities confined to such cerebral matters. The cold, physical fact is that it is the only kind of object that can propel itself into space and back without harm, or predict and prevent a meteor strike on itself, or cool objects to a billionth of a degree above absolute zero, or detect others of its kind across galactic distances.
But no brain on Earth is yet close to knowing what brains do in order to achieve any of that functionality. The enterprise of achieving it artificially — the field of ‘artificial general intelligence’ or AGI — has made no progress whatever during the entire six decades of its existence.
Why? Because, as an unknown sage once remarked, ‘it ain’t what we don’t know that causes trouble, it’s what we know for sure that just ain’t so’ (and if you know that sage was Mark Twain, then what you know ain’t so either).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

9 Historical Figures Who May Have Predicted Our Future

9 Historical Figures Who May Have Predicted Our Future | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

We like to think that many of our fantastic dreams of the future — from space colonization to artificial intelligence and human enhancement — are fairly recent conceptions. But nothing could be further from the truth. Futurist visionaries have been speculating about these possibilities for centuries. And now, as we head into an era of accelerating change, some of these longstanding predictions may actually come true. Here are nine futurists of the past 400 years whose predictions were ahead of their times.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Special Report: The New Medicine

Special Report: The New Medicine | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The New Medicine: Hacking Our Biology is part of the series “Engineers of the New Millennium” from IEEE Spectrum magazine and the Directorate for Engineering of the National Science Foundation. These stories explore technological advances in medical inventions to enhance and extend life.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Andrew McAfee: Are droids taking our jobs?

Robots and algorithms are getting good at jobs like building cars, writing articles, translating -- jobs that once required a human. So what will we humans do for work? Andrew McAfee walks through recent labor data to say: We ain't seen nothing yet. But then he steps back to look at big history, and comes up with a surprising and even thrilling view of what comes next.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Could the Internet Ever “Wake Up”?

Could the Internet Ever “Wake Up”? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

In the world of sci-fi movie geekdom, Aug. 29, 1997, was a turning point for humanity: On that day, according to the Terminator films, the network of U.S. defense computers known as Skynet became self-aware—and soon launched an all-out genocidal war against Homo sapiens.
Fortunately, that date came and went with no such robo-apocalypse. But the 1990s did bring us the World Wide Web, which is now far larger and more “connected” than any nation’s defense network. Could the Internet “wake up”? And if so, what sorts of thoughts would it think? And would it be friend or foe?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Nanorobotics - Medicine of future

Nanorobotics - Medicine of future | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Recent technological developments indicate that doctor might one day start prescribing nanorobotics as pills for serious ailments

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Building a Computer to Model the Brain

Building a Computer to Model the Brain | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

One question that scientists get asked a lot is; how far away we are from creating artificial intelligence? The answer depends of course on what we mean by intelligence but if we are talking about something that is an artificial version of man then the answer is unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately if you grew up watching Terminator) we aren’t even close.

The main reason for that is the human brain. While we are now able to grow ears on mice and create artificial internal organs we are a long way from building a brain. The average brain contains around 100 million neurons connected by a quadrillion constantly changing synapses. Although it uses less energy than is needed to power the average light bulb, if you attempted to recreate this with the computing power available today you would need a nuclear power plant to run it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Biohackers And DIY Cyborgs Clone Silicon Valley Innovation

Biohackers And DIY Cyborgs Clone Silicon Valley Innovation | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

A new breed of hobbyists, scientists, and entrepreneurs are working on echolocation implants, brain-controlled software programs, and even cybernetic rats. Their experiments will change the future of tech.

more...
Arjen ten Have's curator insight, November 28, 2013 10:37 AM

I am not easily scared but the combination of biocomputation and genomics in the hands of laymen? A lot of good will come from it but it also possible that simply due to ignorance, monsters will be created. Or am I just another scientist getting old and wary?