Tracking the Future
Follow
Find
44.2K views | +2 today
Tracking the Future
Explore the most important technology and science trends! News, Analysis, Interviews, Presentations, Documentaries. All in one place at Tracking the future magazine
Curated by Szabolcs Kósa
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

How DARPA's Robotics Challenge Works (Infographic)

How DARPA's Robotics Challenge Works (Infographic) | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Inspired by the disaster response to the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami, the DARPA challenge tests some of the mobility, manipulation and perception skills a robot would need in an emergency situation.

First, robots must drive and exit a utility vehicle. Then they walk across rough terrain and remove debris from a doorway. The robots open a series of doors, climb an industrial ladder and cut through a wall. Then they carry and connect a firehose. Lastly, the robot must locate and close leaking valves.

These test check a robot’s perception, mobility, manual dexterity, decision-making capacity and strength.

 
more...
Caelin Thomas's curator insight, March 26, 8:26 AM

With advances in the ability of robots to detected their surroundings and their ability to walk over unstable grounds leads the increase in robots for disaster relief. these robots can go in place of humans where there is to much risk involved.

Caelin Thomas 

Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Nanomedicine: DNA clamp to grab cancer before it develops

Nanomedicine: DNA clamp to grab cancer before it develops | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

As part of an international research project, a team of researchers has developed a DNA clamp that can detect mutations at the DNA level with greater efficiency than methods currently in use. Their work could facilitate rapid screening of those diseases that have a genetic basis, such as cancer, and provide new tools for more advanced nanotechnology.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Graphene origami opens up new spintronics features

Graphene origami opens up new spintronics features | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Despite graphene's many impressive properties, its lack of a bandgap limits its use in electronic applications. In a new study, scientists have theoretically shown that a bandgap can be opened in graphene by folding 2D graphene sheets origami-style and exposing them to a magnetic field. In addition to opening up a bandgap, this method also produces spin-polarized current in the graphene sheets, making them attractive for spintronics applications.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

New drug approach could lead to cures for wide range of diseases

New drug approach could lead to cures for wide range of diseases | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

A team led by a longtime Oregon Health & Science University researcher has demonstrated in mice what could be a revolutionary new technique to cure a wide range of human diseases -- from cystic fibrosis to cataracts to Alzheimer's disease -- that are caused by "misfolded" protein molecules.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Processors That Work Like Brains Will Accelerate Artificial Intelligence

Processors That Work Like Brains Will Accelerate Artificial Intelligence | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

A new breed of computer chips that operate more like the brain may be about to narrow the gulf between artificial and natural computation—between circuits that crunch through logical operations at blistering speed and a mechanism honed by evolution to process and act on sensory input from the real world. Advances in neuroscience and chip technology have made it practical to build devices that, on a small scale at least, process data the way a mammalian brain does. These “neuromorphic” chips may be the missing piece of many promising but unfinished projects in artificial intelligence, such as cars that drive themselves reliably in all conditions, and smartphones that act as competent conversational assistants.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

CRISPR technology leaps from lab to industry

CRISPR technology leaps from lab to industry | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Instead of taking prescription pills to treat their ailments, patients may one day opt for genetic 'surgery' — using an innovative gene-editing technology to snip out harmful mutations and swap in healthy DNA.
The system, called CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats), has exploded in popularity in the past year, with genetic engineers, neuroscientists and even plant biologists viewing it as a highly efficient and precise research tool. Now, the gene-editing system has spun out a biotechnology company that is attracting attention from investors as well.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Soon Your Old Smartphone Will Let You 3D-Print a Selfie

Soon Your Old Smartphone Will Let You 3D-Print a Selfie | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The future is a place where I see something I want and I simply wave my smartphone over it like a wand and presto I obtain a complete 3D model of it. Any sufficiently advanced technology isindistiguishable from magic after all, and the magical part comes when I send the image from my smartphone to my 3D printer to create a plastic or metal or resin replica of that object. My smartphone has turned into a handheld replicator. 

The least feasible thing about all this perhaps is that a smartphone will still be called a smartphone—this is the future after all and what's a phone in the future—because some researchers in Zurich just debuted technology that aspires to do exactly this.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Scientists improve human self-control through electrical brain stimulation

Scientists improve human self-control through electrical brain stimulation | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Neuroscientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and the University of California, San Diego, have successfully demonstrated a technique to enhance a form of self-control through a novel form of brain stimulation.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

The Winds of Deep Space

The Winds of Deep Space | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

If we can use solar photons to drive a sail, and perhaps use their momentum to stabilize a threatened observatory like Kepler, what about that other great push from the Sun, the solar wind? Unlike the stream of massless photons that exert a minute but cumulative push on a surface like a sail, the solar wind is a stream of charged particles moving at speeds of 500 kilometers per second and more, a flow that has captured the interest of those hoping to create a magnetic sail to ride it. A ‘magsail’ interacts with the solar wind’s plasma. The sailing metaphor remains, but solar sails and magsails get their push from fundamentally different processes.

more...
Colt Alan Lee Manseth's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:21 PM

I can't believe that their are winds in space it just amazes me how much stuff I do not know in this world and beyond.

Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

From Star Trek to Siri: How the Machine-Reading Revolution will dictate the future

From Star Trek to Siri: How the Machine-Reading Revolution will dictate the future | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

IBM's Watson system defeated the human champion on "Jeopardy!" in February 2011 -- surprising the world.
But that feat was a precursor to what is being called a "Machine-Reading Revolution," which is underway now.
Microsoft co-founder Paul G. Allen and entrepreneur Oren Etzioni reveal five ways it will change how you live.
They say it will impact on how we find a hotel, follow our favorite sports team and receive medical advice.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Nanotechnology in Life Sciences

Nanotechnology in Life Sciences | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The fusion of nanotechnology and medicine is changing healthcare as we know it. Organizations and government entities are investing huge amounts in nanotech R&D; life science technology innovators across the world are delivering new products and technologies that almost seem straight from a sci-fi movie.
Take the "lab-on-a-chip" (LOC) concept, for example. Originally based on technology pursued by the U.S. military for detection of biological and chemical warfare agents, the LOC is now being used to examine DNA strands to identify cancer. Soon, researchers expect to have an LOC capable of rendering a complete diagnostic workup using just a drop of blood of urine.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Emerging ethical dilemmas in science and technology

Emerging ethical dilemmas in science and technology | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

As a new year approaches, the University of Notre Dame's John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology and Values has released its annual list of emerging ethical dilemmas and policy issues in science and technology for 2014.

more...
Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, December 10, 2013 8:22 PM

The Reilly Center explores conceptual, ethical and policy issues where science and technology intersect with society from different disciplinary perspectives. Its goal is to promote the advancement of science and technology for the common good.

 

The center generates its annual list of emerging ethical dilemmas and policy issues in science and technology with the help of Reilly fellows, other Notre Dame experts and friends of the center.

 

E-trucit's curator insight, December 11, 2013 3:47 AM

several interesting things

Saranne Davies's curator insight, December 12, 2013 4:48 AM

Interesting article.

Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

A Cybernetic Implant That Repairs Brain Damage

A Cybernetic Implant That Repairs Brain Damage | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

There may be an answer for people suffering from traumatic brain injuries. It's a device called a brain-machine-brain interface — and it has the potential to revolutionize the way brain damage is treated in humans.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

​The Worst Lies You've Been Told About the Singularity

​The Worst Lies You've Been Told About the Singularity | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

In a nutshell, the Technological Singularity is a term used to describe the theoretical moment in time when artificial intelligence matches and then exceeds human intelligence. The term was popularized by scifi writer Vernor Vinge, but full credit goes to the mathematician John von Neumann, who spoke of "ever accelerating progress of technology and changes in the mode of human life, which gives the appearance of approaching some essential singularity in the history of the race beyond which human affairs, as we know them, could not continue."

By "not continue" von Neumann was referring to the potential for humanity to lose control and fall outside the context of its technologies. Today, this technology is assumed to be artificial intelligence, or more accurately, recursively-improving artificial intelligence (RIAI), leading to artificial superintelligence (ASI).

Because we cannot predict the nature and intentions of an artificial superintelligence, we have come to refer to this sociological event horizon the Technological Singularity — a concept that's open to wide interpretation, and by consequence, gross misunderstanding.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Artificial intelligence: The machines with alien minds

Artificial intelligence: The machines with alien minds | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Our smartest machines look nothing like we predicted – has the field lost its way, or do we need to rethink what AI actually means, asks Tom Chatfield.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Virtual afterlives will transform humanity

Virtual afterlives will transform humanity | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The question is not whether we can upload our brains onto a computer, but what will become of us when we do

 
more...
Mlik Sahib's curator insight, December 18, 2013 7:49 PM

"In the real world, two people can share experiences and thoughts. But lacking a USB port in our heads, we can’t directly merge our minds. In a simulated world, that barrier falls. A simple app, and two people will be able to join thoughts directly with each other. Why not? It’s a logical extension. We humans are hyper-social. We love to network. We already live in a half-virtual world of minds linked to minds. In an artificial afterlife, given a few centuries and few tweaks to the technology, what is to stop people from merging into überpeople who are combinations of wisdom, experience, and memory beyond anything possible in biology? Two minds, three minds, 10, pretty soon everyone is linked mind-to-mind. The concept of separate identity is lost. The need for simulated bodies walking in a simulated world is lost. The need for simulated food and simulated landscapes and simulated voices disappears. Instead, a single platform of thought, knowledge, and constant realisation emerges. What starts out as an artificial way to preserve minds after death gradually takes on an emphasis of its own. Real life, our life, shrinks in importance until it becomes a kind of larval phase. Whatever quirky experiences you might have had during your biological existence, they would be valuable only if they can be added to the longer-lived and much more sophisticated machine.

I am not talking about utopia.."

tina bucci's curator insight, December 30, 2013 9:38 PM

Very interesting question.

Rescooped by Szabolcs Kósa from TheFutureIsNow
Scoop.it!

Why Cognition-as-a-Service is the next operating system battlefield

Why Cognition-as-a-Service is the next operating system battlefield | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The Semantic Web may have failed, but higher intelligence is coming to applications anyway, in another form: Cognition-as-a-Service (CaaS). And this may just be the next evolution of the operating system.

CaaS will enable every app to become as smart as Siri in its own niche. CaaS powered apps will be able to think and interact with consumers like intelligent virtual assistants — they will be “cognitive apps.” You will be able to converse with cognitive apps, ask them questions, give them commands — and they will be able to help you complete tasks and manage your work more efficiently.


Via Maurizio [ITA]
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Geraldine Hamilton: Body parts on a chip

It's relatively easy to imagine a new medicine, a better cure for some disease. The hard part, though, is testing it, and that can delay promising new cures for years. In this well-explained talk, Geraldine Hamilton shows how her lab creates organs and body parts on a chip, simple structures with all the pieces essential to testing new medications -- even custom cures for one specific person.

more...
Richard Platt's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:26 AM

We think this is an aweeome video, Geraldine Hamilton is totally awesome she is really geting at the heart of issues in the big pharma and healthcare field and addressing the issues intelligently, nothing but right on the lady, well worth every minute of this short video. Check it out it also has play in the semiconductor realm as well, (also why we like this too)

Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Why the wearable explosion is driving tech and fashion convergence

Why the wearable explosion is driving tech and fashion convergence | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

In an age where fashion continually romps through society’s wardrobes and technology governs our everyday lives, we’ve finally reached a crossroads where industry boundaries between apparel brands and digital platforms have started to blur. And consumer wearables—the bridge between these two worlds—are the catalyst for that convergence.

more...
Investors Europe Stock Brokers's curator insight, September 1, 2014 2:03 AM

Welcome to Investors Europe Mauritius Stock Brokers

@investorseurope Online Trading Paradigm

@offshorebroker Nominee Trading Accounts
http://www.investorseurope.net/en/managing-director ;
http://www.investorseurope.net/en/nominee-accounts

Download Offshore Trading DEMO: http://www.investorseurope.net/offshoretraderdemo.html

Emma Baker's curator insight, November 18, 2014 12:37 AM

With both the fashion industry and technology industry thriving it only makes sense that they come together and use their powers for good. This article talks about the convergence of the two industries and how they are turning into one - with wearable technology. 

Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Novel bio-inspired method to grow high-quality graphene for high-end electronic devices

Novel bio-inspired method to grow high-quality graphene for high-end electronic devices | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS), led by Professor Loh Kian Ping, who heads the Department of Chemistry at the NUS Faculty of Science, has successfully developed an innovative one-step method to grow and transfer high-quality graphene on silicon and other stiff substrates, opening up opportunities for graphene to be used in high-value applications that are currently not technologically feasible.
This breakthrough, inspired by how beetles and tree frogs keep their feet attached to submerged leaves, is the first published technique that accomplishes both the growth and transfer steps of graphene on a silicon wafer. This technique enables the technological application of graphene in photonics and electronics, for devices such as optoelectronic modulators, transistors, on-chip biosensors and tunneling barriers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

The Future of the Internet: Futurist Speaker Gerd Leonhard at ITU World Bangkok 2013

Inspirational futurist Gerd Leonhard delivered a compelling, challenging, and at times chilling glimpse into a possible near future dominated by data, digital dependence and dramatic sociological changes. Over the next ten years, human to machine interfaces will take us far beyond connected fridges, self-parking cars and intelligent wristwatches -- and at an unbelievable pace, as real life begins to outstrip fiction. Artificial intelligence will augment our bodies and extend our personalities into devices as chips as small as 5 nanometres across become fast, cheap and embedded in everything. This is the new version of the internet: the internet of everything with up to 100bn connected devices. We will be living inside a computer -- and our mobile phones will function as an external brain.

Future interfaces will lead to prediction markets, the quantified self, unprecedented access to huge amounts of information, moving from typing to gesturing to going inside a device to pull out data. We can already operate Google glass by blinking -- in the future, thinking will be enough. Used responsibly, this can bring unprecedented benefits, increased efficiency, vastly more comfortable and convenient lifestyles. But there is an equally huge associated risk, as well as the danger of unintended consequences in an age of exponential expansion in connectivity. One simple example is how by leapfrogging over television to YouTube in Indonesia has changed society, changed how people behave, act and think as they have become "more transparent, more digitally naked."

And those risks are nowhere more evident than in the downsides of Big Data. An economy of data, worth up to 15 trillion dollars in new commerce and activities, could trigger #datawars over the power than massive money puts in play -- and pollution in the form of surveillance, lack of trust and flawed privacy. Privacy and security failure is the present as "the power of technology exceeds the scope of ethics". Cloud computing, big data, scanning technologies and other new technologies are running our lives in a deep way. Recent world events make it clear that capturing pretty much everything is technically possible -- yes, we scan, as Gerd punned. And growing awareness of that is set to cost the US, as international companies -- and even countries -- consider putting their clouds, and their business, elsewhere.

Privacy will be the domain of the rich, able to afford encrpyted email and to opt out of permanent surveillance and intrusion. Privacy and trust have been eroded to the extent that police scanning the number plates of passing cars keep that information for up to five years; or bluetooth-enabled rubbish bins connect with mobiles to register anyone walking past. It's all possible; but being able to do it doesn't mean it should be done. Artificial intelligence, M2M communication, the Internet of Things -- none of this might happen unless we can forge new social contracts, ethics, a rule of law that makes us feel safe and lets us work. So what will be important for the industry in this future reality that is already upon us? Trust and ethics are key, according to Gerd. Without establishing a trust framework, no one will survive the next five years. Sector convergence and consumer power are shaping the market. People need to be given control, government laws on copyright and payment must be abandoned. "Forcing people to pay is like forcing people to love. It won't work" -- they will simply migrate to free and more. And telcos are no longer operating in a clear-cut sector, but are instead competing in an arena made of many, and often new, players.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Grow a new brain: First steps to lab-made grey matter

Grow a new brain: First steps to lab-made grey matter | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Bioengineers dream of growing spare parts for our worn-out or diseased bodies. They have already succeeded with some tissues, but one has always eluded them: the brain. Now a team in Sweden has taken the first step towards this ultimate goal.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Ray Kurzweil: This is your future

Ray Kurzweil: This is your future | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Acclaimed futurist Ray Kurzweil on the future of human life -- one where we print organs and play in total immersion environments.

more...
Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, December 20, 2013 6:03 AM

organs printed
diseases healed in 20yrs time 

Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Titanium powder used to 3D print automotive parts

Titanium powder used to 3D print automotive parts | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

To date, the 3D printing revolution has focused on the use of plastics – cheap printers' feedstock and high throughput. Until now 3D printing with metal has been prohibitively expensive because of the cost of titanium powders which currently sell for $200-$400 per kilogram.
Rotherham based company Metalysis have developed a new way of producing low-lost titanium powder, which heralds a new era in additive layer manufacture, and will see greater use of titanium in components across the automotive, aerospace and defence industries.
The Renishaw 3D printer, which is based at the Mercury Centre within the Department of Materials at the University of Sheffield, made the parts, demonstrating the feasibility of producing titanium components using additive layer manufacturing.
The Metalysis process is radically cheaper and environmentally benign compared with existing titanium production methods, such as the energy-intensive and toxic Kroll process.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

3rd Annual Seymour Benzer Lecture - Aliens, computers and the bio-economy - An introduction to synthetic biology

Our capacity to partner with biology to make useful things is limited by the tools that we can use to specify, design, prototype, test, and analyze natural or engineered biological systems. However, biology has typically been engaged as a "technology of last resort" in attempts to solve problems that other more mature technologies cannot. This lecture will examine some recent progress on virus genome redesign and hidden DNA messages from outer space, building living data storage, logic, and communication systems, and how simple but old and nearly forgotten engineering ideas are helping make biology easier to engineer.

more...
No comment yet.