Tracking the Future
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Tracking the Future
Explore the most important technology and science trends! News, Analysis, Interviews, Presentations, Documentaries. All in one place at Tracking the future magazine
Curated by Szabolcs Kósa
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Nanotechnology's Revolutionary Next Phase

Nanotechnology's Revolutionary Next Phase | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The fruition of atomically precise manufacturing (APM) — nanotech’s next phase — promises to create such “radical abundance” that it will not only change industry but civilization itself.
At least that’s the view of Eric Drexler, considered by most to be the father of nanotechnology. An American engineer, technologist and author with three degrees from M.I.T., Drexler is currently at the “Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology” at Oxford University in the U.K.

Forbes.com questioned Drexler about points discussed in his forthcoming book, Radical Abundance: How a Revolution in Nanotechnology Will Change Civilization, due out in May.

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Roger Ellman's curator insight, February 27, 2013 5:53 AM

We'll get there - you'll see!

Sworoba OyetKep's curator insight, March 19, 2013 3:12 AM

This article as the question how will nanotechnology change the course of civilization. The arrticle criticises material science and focuses on the inovations nanotechnology will have in the near future. It puts emphasis on the benifits of nanotechnology and how large corporations can take advantage. The article critically reviews the role atomically precise manufacturing (AMP) will impact in the future. How effective will AMP be in reaching its intended purpose. The article also points to other technologies that derives from manufacturing with the aid of nanotechnology. These into nanomedicine, the military and possibly nanotechnology in aerospace. In summary the point being forward here is that all roads will lead to some sort of nanotechnology.

Ryan Murphy's curator insight, March 21, 2013 9:54 PM

An interesting look at the future posibilities of Nanotechnology on the Atomic Scale.

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Humanity's deep future

Humanity's deep future | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

When we peer into the fog of the deep future what do we see – human extinction or a future among the stars?

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Blueprint for an artificial brain: Scientists experiment with memristors that imitate natural nerves

Blueprint for an artificial brain: Scientists experiment with memristors that imitate natural nerves | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Scientists have long been dreaming about building a computer that would work like a brain. This is because a brain is far more energy-saving than a computer, it can learn by itself, and it doesn't need any programming. Privatdozent [senior lecturer] Dr. Andy Thomas from Bielefeld University's Faculty of Physics is experimenting with memristors -- electronic microcomponents that imitate natural nerves. Thomas and his colleagues have demonstrated that they could do this a year ago. They constructed a memristor that is capable of learning. Andy Thomas is now using his memristors as key components in a blueprint for an artificial brain.

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A World Without Work

A World Without Work | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Imagine, as 19th-century utopians often did, a society rich enough that fewer and fewer people need to work — a society where leisure becomes universally accessible, where part-time jobs replace the regimented workweek, and where living standards keep rising even though more people have left the work force altogether.
If such a utopia were possible, one might expect that it would be achieved first among the upper classes, and then gradually spread down the social ladder. First the wealthy would work shorter hours, then the middle class, and finally even high school dropouts would be able to sleep late and take four-day weekends and choose their own adventures — “to hunt in the morning,” as Karl Marx once prophesied, “fish in the afternoon, rear cattle in the evening, criticize after dinner ...”
Yet the decline of work isn’t actually some wild Marxist scenario.

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Virtual reality: John Carmack's battle for 20 millisecond latency

Virtual reality: John Carmack's battle for 20 millisecond latency | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The Oculus Rift is looking to have finally cracked the problems that beset early attempts at virtual reality headsets. It’s fitted with high res viewing panels for each eye, internal sensors that track head motion accurately and quickly, and it’s in a sub $1000 price range. But the biggest issue the developers have had to overcome is latency.

As John Carmack puts it, “The latency between the physical movement of a user’s head and updated photons from a head mounted display reaching their eyes is one of the most critical factors in providing a high quality experience.”

You can find out why and how they’ve tried to overcome this problem...

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NASA’s cold fusion tech could put a nuclear reactor in every home, car, and plane

NASA’s cold fusion tech could put a nuclear reactor in every home, car, and plane | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The cold fusion dream lives on: NASA is developing cheap, clean, low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) technology that could eventually see cars, planes, and homes powered by small, safe nuclear reactors.

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Krozen's curator insight, February 22, 2013 12:25 PM

Ubiquitous reactors just like most sci-fi cities. Reactors powering starships to toasters. well, we're a step closer!

Mike Grozelle's curator insight, September 11, 2015 12:54 PM

This technology is the next step in our technological evolution. There are some incredible advancements happening all over the world. Locally Lockheed and Martin is one of the front runners, claiming that they should have an Industrial/Commercial prototype completed in the next 4-5 years. The plan is to implement this technology in space travel,  fight on terrorism, regular travel, homes, energy applications and of course health and research and development. This is a great step for our time and the generations alive to observe it should be proud to say they witnessed the birth of free clean energy. Do not let the word "free" make your eyes too big. As this will definitely impact the way the world functions, it will inevitably be purchased or controlled by some private/governing body and we will definitely be paying for it. But the early projections claim that a small cold fusion reactor being placed in the cargo hold of a 747 would allow it to travel non-stop around the globe 7 times before needing to stop. As you can see the practical applications would be immense! I look forward to seeing this further develop and will be happy to see countries less fortunate being given the opportunity to have affordable energy for the first time ever. 


Mike Grozelle

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Future science: Using 3D worlds to visualize data

Future science: Using 3D worlds to visualize data | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Take a walk through a human brain? Fly over the surface of Mars? Computer scientists at the University of Illinois at Chicago are pushing science fiction closer to reality with a wraparound virtual world where a researcher wearing 3D glasses can do all that and more.

In the system, known as CAVE2, an 8-foot-high screen encircles the viewer 320 degrees. A panorama of images springs from 72 stereoscopic liquid crystal display panels, conveying a dizzying sense of being able to touch what's not really there.

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Jan Herder's curator insight, February 23, 2013 10:23 AM

Second Life on steroids

Marisa Conde's curator insight, February 23, 2013 2:15 PM

a travez de Erik Miranda en FB llegué aquí

Jan Herder's comment, February 23, 2013 2:42 PM
Awesome! Thanks for the link
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Is This What Urban Buildings Will Look Like In 2050?

Is This What Urban Buildings Will Look Like In 2050? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

2050 is far enough off to imagine the urban environment will be very different from today. But, from current trends, we know a few things are likely. Three-quarters of people will live in a city, or 6.75 billion of the projected 9 billion global total. Everyone will have grown up with the Internet, and its successors. And city residents will have access to less natural resources than today, making regeneration and efficiency more of a priority.
Based on this, and extrapolating out some emerging ideas, the engineering and design firm Arup has come up with this mock-up of the building of the future.

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The "Tracking the future" video collection is moving to Pinterest

The "Tracking the future" video collection is moving to Pinterest | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it
Mind blowing videos of excellent thinkers and amazing technologies. Explore the rapid advancement of science and technology and the long term impact on society and the future of humanity! Share if you like!
Szabolcs Kósa's insight:

The video collection is moving to Pinterest due to Chill.com changing business model without properly noticing their loyal userbase. Only videos from 2013 are available at the moment, but every new video content will be pinned here. Follow for the best future related video content. http://pinterest.com/trackingthe/future/

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Beyond Asimov: the struggle to develop a legal framework for robots

Beyond Asimov: the struggle to develop a legal framework for robots | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

"Robots are no longer science fiction, as they have left the factory and are arriving in our homes," says Salvini from the BioRobotics Institute at the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna (SSSA) in Pisa, Italy. And Asimov's Three Laws simply aren't sufficient.
As part of the unique EU-backed €1.5 million RoboLaw Project, Salvini is managing a team of roboticists, lawyers and philosophers (yes, philosophers) from a consortium of European universities, who are working hard to come up with proposals for the laws and regulations necessary to manage emerging robotics technologies in Europe in time to present them to European Commission a year from now. The consortium comprises the University of Tilburg (the Netherlands), the Humboldt University of Berlin, the University of Reading and the SSSA.

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Sophie Martin's curator insight, March 19, 2013 5:19 AM

 

What laws, how to define them about such unconceivable object …heu…thing…euh person? Well some note :
"I can't define a robot, but I know one when I see one"(Joseph Engelberger, one of the fathers of robotics)
The list, says Salvini, takes into account autonomous robots, including neurobiotics -- robots controlled via a brain-computer interface -- and service robots that operate in the home, cities and other public roles.
"These are exactly the kind of problems that roboticists will struggle with, as while they need to test their robots outside of the laboratory they are not always good at dealing with the social and legal environment."
After all, there are some schools of thought see robots as autonomous individuals with the same or comparable rights as those of humans. "Or how do you actually describe a robot? You can address it like an animal or pet, but if your dog attacks someone then you are liable."
‘A key issue is the lack of public awareness and debate about these issues. "So many people see our research as 'science fiction work', although we are working mainly on problems society is facing right now," explains Beck, adding that it's necessary to inform society about the existing research -- often taking place behind closed doors -- and potential applications.”
"After all, lawyers cannot answer questions for society." Society has first to decide which robots it wants to accept, which risks it wants to take, who should be responsible for damages caused by robots, she warns.”
Ect ….ect …
hughrlk...
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Scientist who gave rats 'sixth sense' promises bigger revolutions ahead

Scientist who gave rats 'sixth sense' promises bigger revolutions ahead | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The scientist who has given a “sixth sense” to laboratory animals by allowing them to detect invisible infrared light has promised an even bigger revolution in the research field he has pioneered.

Miguel Nicolelis, a Brazilian neuroscientist working at Duke University in the United States, said that he has created a way of allowing animals to communicate with each other through artificial aids connected directly to their brains.

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Diamond idea for quantum computer

Diamond idea for quantum computer | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The long-touted idea of ultra-high speed computing takes another step closer. All it requires is one of the world’s hardest materials.

Szabolcs Kósa's insight:

the ideal material for a quantum computer could be diamond

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A sensational breakthrough: the first bionic hand that can feel

A sensational breakthrough: the first bionic hand that can feel | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The first bionic hand that allows an amputee to feel what they are touching will be transplanted later this year in a pioneering operation that could introduce a new generation of artificial limbs with sensory perception.
The wiring of his new bionic hand will be connected to the patient’s nervous system with the hope that the man will be able to control the movements of the hand as well as receiving touch signals from the hand’s skin sensors.

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The Robot Will See You Now

The Robot Will See You Now | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

IBM's Watson—the same machine that beat Ken Jennings at Jeopardy—is now churning through case histories at Memorial Sloan-Kettering, learning to make diagnoses and treatment recommendations. This is one in a series of developments suggesting that technology may be about to disrupt health care in the same way it has disrupted so many other industries. Are doctors necessary? Just how far might the automation of medicine go?

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Quantum algorithm breakthrough

Quantum algorithm breakthrough | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

An international research group led by scientists from the University of Bristol, UK, and the University of Queensland, Australia, has demonstrated a quantum algorithm that performs a true calculation for the first time.
The team implemented the “phase estimation algorithm” — a central quantum algorithm that achieves an exponential speedup over all classical algorithms.

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How 3D printing could revolutionise the solar energy industry

How 3D printing could revolutionise the solar energy industry | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

More efficient, less complex and cheaper, 3D solar cells can also capture more sunlight than conventional PV models

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CineversityTV's curator insight, May 31, 2013 10:04 AM

when will this hit the market?

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How to Make a Mind | World Future Society

How to Make a Mind | World Future Society | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it
Can nonbiological brains have real minds of their own? In this article, drawn from his latest book, futurist/inventor Ray Kurzweil describes the future of intelligence—artificial and otherwise.
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Groundbreaking Virtual Robotics Allow Us Our Very Own Robot Avatar

Groundbreaking Virtual Robotics Allow Us Our Very Own Robot Avatar | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

A research group lead by Professor Tachi at Keio University in Japan is currently working on one of the first incarnations of an avatar that incorporates some pretty cool virtual robotics technology. By slipping on a pair of virtual reality gloves and a helmet, you would be able to control and see the world through your avatar’s eyes. The concept behind this virtual robotics technology is really called Telexistence, and it allows us to control a real avatar robot.

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Hayden Theuerkauf's curator insight, March 21, 2013 9:56 PM

This particular website gives information on the creation of avatar/robots that humans will be able to control. This will change the future, technology will allow humans to create there own avatar in the form of a robot, allowing humans to stay home whilst there avatar/robot goes out to do there daily needs or to even do there jobs at a single touch of a button, this technology will vastly change how the world works and runs.

cassian bulger's curator insight, March 22, 2013 5:38 AM

Technology such as this which provides an avatar that can be operated remotely has infinite potential to make the lives of countless people easyer such robots provide an "out of body" experience and when perfected can enable working remotly and remotly carrying out daily chores. With strides like this technology is taking remarkable strides into how we are shaping our future. 

Mercor's curator insight, March 22, 2013 7:03 AM

Rescooped by ManufacturingStories from How will robotics change lives in the near future onto Robotics in Manufacturing Today

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Toward Intelligent Humanoids | iCub 2012

Director / Screenwriter / Voice Over: Mikhail Frank
Co-Director / Cinematographer / Editor: Tomás Donoso (tomasdonoso.com)
Music: Magnus Birgersson aka Solar Fields (solarfields.com) Ultimae Records (ultimae.com)

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Retinal implant restores partial sight to blind people

Retinal implant restores partial sight to blind people | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Some previously blind patients fitted with retinal implant could read signs, tell the time and distinguish white wine from red.

The patients have described smiles on friendly faces, the food on their plates, and household objects from telephones to dustbins, after surgeons fitted them with electronic chips to partially restore their vision.

Results from the first eight patients to enrol in a clinical trial of the retinal implants show that five found the chips improved their eyesight enough to be useful in everyday life.

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Martha Jane Montgomery's curator insight, February 23, 2013 3:36 PM

Amazing what can be done with blind patients to restore enough sight to help them in the sight-seeing world! Does anyone remember doing an experiment on what it would be like to not be able to have any eye sight by shutting our eyes or by blindfolding ourselves?

Steven Vo's curator insight, March 28, 2014 9:46 AM

Previously there were no way for a blind person to see, but now with the advanced technology that humans currently have they are now able to restore partial sight for those who are blind.

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3D Printing Revolution: the Complex Reality

3D Printing Revolution: the Complex Reality | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

In the past couple of years, the concept of low-cost 3D printing has captured the hearts and minds of millions of geeks. The allure of an upcoming manufacturing revolution has seeped into the mainstream, too: take The Economist, which ran about two dozen articles about this technology within the last year alone. Something must be in the air!
The charm of 3D printing is easy to understand, especially as it coincides with the renaissance of the DIY movement on the Internet. But all this positive buzz also has an interesting downside: it makes it easy to overlook that the most significant barriers to home manufacturing run very deep, and probably won’t be affected just by the arrival of a new generation of tools.

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The Rise of the Robots

The Rise of the Robots | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

What impact will automation – the so-called “rise of the robots” – have on wages and employment over the coming decades? Nowadays, this question crops up whenever unemployment rises.
In the early nineteenth century, David Ricardo considered the possibility that machines would replace labor; Karl Marx followed him. Around the same time, the Luddites smashed the textile machinery that they saw as taking their jobs.
Then the fear of machines died away. New jobs – at higher wages, in easier conditions, and for more people – were soon created and readily found. But that does not mean that the initial fear was wrong. On the contrary, it must be right in the very long run: sooner or later, we will run out of jobs.
For some countries, this long-run prospect might be uncomfortably close. So, what are people to do if machines can do all (or most of) their work?

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How Neuroscience Will Fight Five Age-Old Afflictions

How Neuroscience Will Fight Five Age-Old Afflictions | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Rewiring the brain to battle seizures, blindness, and more

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Martha Jane Montgomery's curator insight, February 23, 2013 3:52 PM

Read this interesting Article to learn how Medical Technology Advancement can rewire the brain to help Dementia, Drug Abuse and much more!!

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How Silicon Valley Envisions The Future Of Health Care

How Silicon Valley Envisions The Future Of Health Care | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Predicting the future of health care is a tricky business. At any point, there could be a big breakthrough in, say, cancer research, throwing the whole thing off. Or a new technology could come along in another sector, disrupting health care just as a side effect (much like the smartphone has already done). FutureMed, a weeklong program from Singularity University for doctors and others in the health care industry, looks at the ways that technology could change health care in the coming years. I spent a day at Singularity’s classroom (located at the NASA Research Park in Silicon Valley) to soak up some of the predictions. Here are some of the biggest takeaway

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Project Seeks to Build Map of Human Brain

Project Seeks to Build Map of Human Brain | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The Obama administration is planning a decade-long scientific effort to examine the workings of the human brain and build a comprehensive map of its activity, seeking to do for the brain what the Human Genome Project did for genetics.
The project, which the administration has been looking to unveil as early as March, will include federal agencies, private foundations and teams of neuroscientists and nanoscientists in a concerted effort to advance the knowledge of the brain’s billions of neurons and gain greater insights into perception, actions and, ultimately, consciousness.

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