Tracking the Future
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Tracking the Future
Explore the most important technology and science trends! News, Analysis, Interviews, Presentations, Documentaries. All in one place at Tracking the future magazine
Curated by Szabolcs Kósa
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Nanotechnology needle arrays for drug delivery

Nanotechnology needle arrays for drug delivery | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The ultimate goal of nanotechnology-enabled drug delivery, especially with regard to cancer therapy, is to ferry most of the administered drug to the target, while eliminating the accumulation of the drug at any non-target tissues.
Nanomedicine applications with targeted nanoparticles are expected to revolutionize cancer therapy. The use of such nanoparticles to deliver therapeutic agents is currently being studied as a promising method by which drugs can be effectively targeted to specific cells in the body, such as tumor cells.

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We're One Step Closer to Nuclear Fusion Energy

We're One Step Closer to Nuclear Fusion Energy | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Scientists with the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory announced today that they have achieved a critical step in fusion research: For the first time, their hydrogen fuel has given off more energy than it took in.

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Martin Jaime De Alda Earle's curator insight, February 15, 2014 11:52 AM

¿Sería bueno? Sí pero.....

Celest Ybarra's curator insight, March 29, 2014 8:26 PM

Title: We're One Step Closer to Nuclear Fusion Energy

Author: Adam Mann

Main Idea: Scientists have a breakthrough and have discovered a new way to harness power through the use of fusion.

Summary:

1) The National Ignition Facility (NIF) have achieved a critical step in fusion research: hydrogen fuel has given off more energy than it took in.

2) Nuclear fusion is the energy source of the stars., and can now give off as much as 1.7 times more energy than it had taken in

3) Troubles came when scientists found it was extremely difficult to get their hydrogen fuel to compress in the right way, but  NIF scientists learned from their experiments, and tweaked their designs

Opinion: No, this article was based off of facts, research, and assumptions buy scientists.

Questions: How will nuclear energy effect the environment? Can it be used for war?

Is this article important to science?: Yes, because it was such a big breakthrough in science and can one day be a major energy resource.

Source: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2014/02/fusion-power-not-yet/

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US military begins work on brain implants that can restore lost memories, experiences

US military begins work on brain implants that can restore lost memories, experiences | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

DARPA, at the behest of the US Department of Defense, is developing a black box brain implant — an implant that will be wired into a soldier’s brain and record their memories. If the soldier then suffers memory loss due to brain injury, the implant will then be used to restore those memories. The same implant could also be used during training or in the line of duty too, stimulating the right regions of the brain can improve how quickly you learn new skills, reduce your reaction times, and more.

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Beyond the Moore's Law: Nanocomputing using nanowire tiles

Beyond the Moore's Law: Nanocomputing using nanowire tiles | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

An interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers from The MITRE Corporation and Harvard University have taken key steps toward ultra-small electronic computer systems that push beyond the imminent end of Moore's Law, which states that the device density and overall processing power for computers will double every two to three years.

The ultra-small, ultra-low-power control processor—termed a nanoelectronic finite-state machine or "nanoFSM"—is smaller than a human nerve cell. It is composed of hundreds of nanowire transistors, each of which is a switch about ten-thousand times thinner than a human hair. The nanowire transistors use very little power because they are "nonvolatile." That is, the switches remember whether they are on or off, even when no power is supplied to them.

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James Jandebeur's curator insight, February 1, 2014 12:57 PM

It mentions that the processors can now be made smaller than a neuron, I wonder how its power compares. Still, quite a breakthrough if it works out.

aanve's curator insight, February 1, 2014 11:09 PM
www.aanve.com
Christian Verstraete's curator insight, February 3, 2014 1:29 AM

Will this address our needs when we reach the physical limits of our current chip technology?

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Imagine your robot today. Design one tomorrow.

With an open source robot design for 3-D printers, discover how Intel's 21st Century Robot program hopes to increase the growth rate, diversity, and utility of robots by allowing anyone to create and program their own robot.

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New form of quantum matter: Natural 3D counterpart to graphene discovered

New form of quantum matter: Natural 3D counterpart to graphene discovered | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The discovery of what is essentially a 3D version of graphene – the 2D sheets of carbon through which electrons race at many times the speed at which they move through silicon - promises exciting new things to come for the high-tech industry, including much faster transistors and far more compact hard drives.

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Michael Ravensbergen's curator insight, January 17, 2014 3:58 AM

Counterpart graphene!!!

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Can we build an artificial superintelligence that won't kill us?

Can we build an artificial superintelligence that won't kill us? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

At some point in our future, an artificial intelligence will emerge that's smarter, faster, and vastly more powerful than us. Once this happens, we'll no longer be in charge. But what will happen to humanity? And how can we prepare for this transition? 

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Computer science: The learning machines

Computer science: The learning machines | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Using massive amounts of data to recognize photos and speech, deep-learning computers are taking a big step towards true artificial intelligence.

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R Schumacher & Associates LLC's curator insight, January 15, 2014 1:43 PM

The monikers such as "deep learning" may be new, but Artificial Intelligence has always been the Holy Grail of computer science.  The applications are many, and the path is becoming less of an uphill climb.  

luiy's curator insight, February 26, 2014 6:19 AM

Deep learning itself is a revival of an even older idea for computing: neural networks. These systems, loosely inspired by the densely interconnected neurons of the brain, mimic human learning by changing the strength of simulated neural connections on the basis of experience. Google Brain, with about 1 million simulated neurons and 1 billion simulated connections, was ten times larger than any deep neural network before it. Project founder Andrew Ng, now director of the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at Stanford University in California, has gone on to make deep-learning systems ten times larger again.

 

Such advances make for exciting times in artificial intelligence (AI) — the often-frustrating attempt to get computers to think like humans. In the past few years, companies such as Google, Apple and IBM have been aggressively snapping up start-up companies and researchers with deep-learning expertise. For everyday consumers, the results include software better able to sort through photos, understand spoken commands and translate text from foreign languages. For scientists and industry, deep-learning computers can search for potential drug candidates, map real neural networks in the brain or predict the functions of proteins.

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The Awareness

On the eve of a technological breakthrough, an insignificant janitor and a prominent engineer are faced with a decision that will alter the course of humanity: the release of the first aware computer system into the world.

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Forget artificial intelligence. It's artificial idiocy we need to worry about

Forget artificial intelligence. It's artificial idiocy we need to worry about | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Massive, inconceivable numbers are commonplace in conversations about computers. The exabyte, a one followed by 18 zeroes worth of bytes; the petaflop, one quadrillion calculations performed in a single second. Beneath the surface of our lives churns an ocean of information, from whose depths answers and optimisations ascend like munificent kraken.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 14, 2014 1:33 PM

Consider the people who are out there blindly promoting technology.

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Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience

Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Computers have entered the age when they are able to learn from their own mistakes, a development that is about to turn the digital world on its head.

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VendorFit's curator insight, December 31, 2013 3:27 PM

Artificial intelligence is the holy grail of technological achievment, creating an entity that can learn from its own mistakes and can (independently of programmer intervention) develop new routines and programs.  The New York Times claims that the first ever "learning" computer chip is to be released in 2014, an innovation that has profound consequences for the tech market.  When these devices become cheaper, this should allow for robotics and device manufacture that incorporates more detailed sensory input and can parse real objects, like faces, from background noise. 

Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, January 10, 2014 1:16 PM

The Singularity is not far away

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Testing on revolutionary marine energy device begins

Testing on revolutionary marine energy device begins | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The Whatever Input to Torsion Transfer (WITT) transmission system collects chaotic movement in water, wind, human, animal or vehicle motion and turns it into useable power.

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Of Hellabytes and Recombinant Innovation: The Second Machine Age

Andrew McAfee argues that we are advancing so rapidly that our progress is no longer about a difference in degree, but a difference in kind. Along with Erik Brynjolfsson, Andrew is the co-author of The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies

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Roger Ellman's curator insight, February 13, 2014 7:27 AM

Fair 4.5 minutes video address ( 30% information 70% inspiration) on our step up to new progress levels - rather than just mulitplication etc, and the new shapes of progress building upon progress. Not a revelation, but good to be supported and reminded that we are moving on!

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CRISPR and Other Genome Editing Tools Boost Medical Research and Gene Therapy’s Reach

CRISPR and Other Genome Editing Tools Boost Medical Research and Gene Therapy’s Reach | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Over the last decade, as DNA-sequencing technology has grown ever faster and cheaper, our understanding of the human genome has increased accordingly. Yet scientists have until recently remained largely ham-fisted when they’ve tried to directly modify genes in a living cell. Take sickle-cell anemia, for example. A debilitating and often deadly disease, it is caused by a mutation in just one of a patient’s three billion DNA base pairs. Even though this genetic error is simple and well studied, researchers are helpless to correct it and halt its devastating effects.

Now there is hope in the form of new genome-engineering tools, particularly one called CRISPR. This technology could allow researchers to perform microsurgery on genes, precisely and easily changing a DNA sequence at exact locations on a chromosome. Along with a technique called TALENs, invented several years ago, and a slightly older predecessor based on molecules called zinc finger nucleases, CRISPR could make gene therapies more broadly applicable, providing remedies for simple genetic disorders like sickle-cell anemia and eventually even leading to cures for more complex diseases involving multiple genes. Most conventional gene therapies crudely place new genetic material at a random location in the cell and can only add a gene. In contrast, CRISPR and the other new tools also give scientists a precise way to delete and edit specific bits of DNA—even by changing a single base pair. This means they can rewrite the human genome at will.

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BigField GEG Tech's curator insight, February 15, 2014 6:51 AM

In little more than a year, CRISPR has begun reinventing genetic research.


http://geg-tech.com

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Physicists correct quantum errors

Physicists correct quantum errors | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Scientists from the FOM Foundation and the Technical University Delft, working together at the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, have succeeded in detecting and correcting errors during the storage of quantum states in a diamond. This is an important step towards protecting fragile quantum information long enough to realize a functioning quantum computer.

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Google isn't the only company working on artificial intelligence. It's just the richest

Google isn't the only company working on artificial intelligence. It's just the richest | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Everyone’s more interested in artificial intelligence since news broke that Google acquired a secretive startup called DeepMind. The technology has big promise, but make no mistake: It’s not sentient yet, and Google is far from alone in its quest.

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Christian Verstraete's curator insight, February 3, 2014 1:31 AM

AI has been around for many years. Are we finally cracking the ceiling? 

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The onrushing wave

The onrushing wave | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it
Previous technological innovation has always delivered more long-run employment, not less. But things can change
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Christian Verstraete's curator insight, February 3, 2014 1:33 AM

Technology Innovation and jobs.

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Kugelblitz! Powering a Starship With a Black Hole

Kugelblitz! Powering a Starship With a Black Hole | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

An interstellar spacecraft could conceivably be powered by the radiation emitted by a tiny, manmade black hole. Here's a look at what it would take to turn this ambitious idea into reality.

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New Pills Deliver Bacteria, Not Drugs, To Cure Us

New Pills Deliver Bacteria, Not Drugs, To Cure Us | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

It seems that nearly every day, scientists connect another medical condition to atypical gut bacteria populations. Researchers have claimed that gut bacteria play a role not just in digestive health but even in basic brain function and mental health.
Certain bacteria are so clearly good for us that several companies are looking to market pills filled not with chemical drugs, but with bacteria.
A few pharmaceutical startups have already begun testing bacterial medicines in hopes of finding the right strain or stains of bacteria to cure widespread and still mysterious illnesses.

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Ji-Wei's curator insight, January 17, 2014 1:02 AM

New pills are being developed that cure us by using something different. These new pills are not using drugs but are using help bacteria. Scientists are testing these new drugs to find cures for widespread and mysterious diseases. I am wondering when these pills will become more widespread?

 

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Integrated quantum circuit is most complex ever

Integrated quantum circuit is most complex ever | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Researchers in the UK, Japan and the Netherlands have fabricated the most functionally complex integrated quantum circuit ever from a single material, capable of generating photons and entangling them at the same time. The circuit consists of two photon sources on a silicon chip that interfere quantum mechanically. Its inventors say that it could be used in quantum information processing applications and in complex on-chip quantum optics experiments.

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Battery Advance Could Help Solve Renewable Energy Intermittency

Battery Advance Could Help Solve Renewable Energy Intermittency | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Utilities would love to be able to store the power that wind farms generate at night—when no one wants it—and use it when demand is high during the day. But conventional battery technology is so expensive that it only makes economic sense to store a few minutes of electricity, enough to smooth out a few fluctuations from gusts of wind.

Harvard University researchers say they’ve developed a new type of battery that could make it economical to store a couple of days of electricity from wind farms and other sources of power. 

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Hyping Artificial Intelligence, Yet Again

Hyping Artificial Intelligence, Yet Again | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Some advances are genuinely exciting, but whether they will really produce human-level A.I. is unclear.

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luiy's curator insight, February 26, 2014 6:23 AM

..... but, examined carefully, the articles seem more enthusiastic than substantive. As I wrote before, the story about Watson was off the mark factually. The deep-learning piece had problems, too. Sunday’s story is confused at best; there is nothing new in teaching computers to learn from their mistakes. Instead, the article seems to be about building computer chips that use “brainlike” algorithms, but the algorithms themselves aren’t new, either. As the author notes in passing, “the new computing approach” is “already in use by some large technology companies.” Mostly, the article seems to be about neuromorphic processors—computer processors that are organized to be somewhat brainlike—though, as the piece points out, they have been around since the nineteen-eighties. In fact, the core idea of Sunday’s article—nets based “on large groups of neuron-like elements … that learn from experience”—goes back over fifty years, to the well-known Perceptron, built by Frank Rosenblatt in 1957. (If you check the archives, the Times billed it as a revolution, with the headline “NEW NAVY DEVICE LEARNS BY DOING.” The New Yorker similarly gushed about the advancement.) The only new thing mentioned is a computer chip, as yet unproven but scheduled to be released this year, along with the claim that it can “potentially [make] the term ‘computer crash’ obsolete.” Steven Pinker wrote me an e-mail after reading the Timesstory, saying “We’re back in 1985!”—the last time there was huge hype in the mainstream media about neural networks.

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Graphene can host exotic new quantum electronic states at its edges

Graphene can host exotic new quantum electronic states at its edges | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Graphene has become an all-purpose wonder material, spurring armies of researchers to explore new possibilities for this two-dimensional lattice of pure carbon. But new research at MIT has found additional potential for the material by uncovering unexpected features that show up under some extreme conditions — features that could render graphene suitable for exotic uses such as quantum computing.

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Michael Ravensbergen's curator insight, December 28, 2013 7:23 AM

The beauty of graphene and research!!

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Japanese robot crushes competition in robot olympics

Japanese robot crushes competition in robot olympics | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

If you are ever trapped in a collapsed building, SCHAFT is the robot you’ll want by your side. The a bipedal robot, built by a Japanese team, just took the top score in the DARPA Robotics Challenge trials, where it scored 27 out of a possible 32 points.

IHMC Robotics (20 points), Tartan Rescue (18 points), MIT (16 points), RoboSimian (14 points), WRECS (11 points), TracLabs (11 points) and Trooper (9 points) filled out the next seven spots. DARPA will soon announce up to eight teams that will receive funding to proceed on to the finals next year.

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