Tracking the Future
Follow
Find tag "neurotechnology"
43.6K views | +7 today
Tracking the Future
Explore the most important technology and science trends! News, Analysis, Interviews, Presentations, Documentaries. All in one place at Tracking the future magazine
Curated by Szabolcs Kósa
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

The Next Generation in Neural Prosthetics

The Next Generation in Neural Prosthetics | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Following up on the success of cochlear and retinal prostheses for people who have lost sensory function, neuroscientists see a limitless horizon for related devices that are able to read electrical and chemical signals from the nervous system to stimulate capability and restore quality of life in persons suffering injury and disease.

In the future, according to researchers, the devices – known as neural prosthetics – will help epileptics, persons with treatment-resistant depression and chronic pain, victims of Alzheimer’s disease, wounded war veterans suffering post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury, persons with speech disabilities, and individuals who have sustained spinal cord injury and loss of limbs, among other applications in the research pipeline.

But before neural prosthetics can advance, engineers will be called on to make innovative use of materials to design and fabricate devices that allow sustained electronic functioning in the harsh environment of the human body, without causing tissue infection and other serious adverse conditions. Research efforts have focused on enhancing the performance of various types of materials used in neural prosthetics, in addition to developing interface technologies that enable the micro devices to be safely implanted in human tissue for long periods.

more...
aanve's curator insight, March 1, 2014 10:05 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Richard Platt's curator insight, March 2, 2014 11:46 AM

Very interesting wearable - on the inside of the body, - their big issue is having to solve the contradiction of stiff and flexible, turns out it is what is known as Physical Contradiction based on time.  Numerous inventive principles for solving that problem. 

Jordan Melnik's curator insight, March 27, 6:16 AM

This source further discusses the use of brain signals for prosthetics. It also discusses the progression of this technology and its importance.

Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Computer Chips in Your Brain

Computer Chips in Your Brain | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Imagine a world where information can be downloaded straight to your brain. It's not as unrealistic as you might think.

more...
Marcin Piotr Świderski's curator insight, November 25, 2013 4:08 PM

It sounds pretty insane - but just think of it - how cool would it be...

Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

How We'll Command the Future With Our Thoughts

How We'll Command the Future With Our Thoughts | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The minds of man and machine suffer from a glaring disconnect: The inability to interface directly with one another. We have to use our hands, keyboards, and mice to issue commands to our robotic minions and they can only respond via physical sensory mediums. But we can do better. We can use our minds. In fact, we already are.

more...
Paul P Roberts's curator insight, October 18, 2013 5:26 PM

Given the notion that certain humans can do more than one thing at a time how will we deal with physcially doing one thing whilst be controlling something else?  Recreation and work both at the same time?

Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Better Brain Implant

Better Brain Implant | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

A thin, flexible electrode, developed at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., is 10 times smaller than the nearest competition, looking to make long-term measurements of neural activity practical at last.
This kind of technology could eventually find use in sending signals to prosthetic limbs, overcoming inflammation larger electrodes cause that damages both the brain and the electrodes.

more...
luiy's curator insight, April 6, 2013 6:37 AM

A thin, flexible electrode, developed at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., is 10 times smaller than the nearest competition, looking to make long-term measurements of neural activity practical at last.

This kind of technology could eventually find use in sending signals to prosthetic limbs, overcoming inflammation larger electrodes cause that damages both the brain and the electrodes.

 

The main problem that neurons have with electrodes is that they make terrible neighbors. In addition to being enormous compared to neurons, they are stiff and tend to rub nearby cells the wrong way. The resident immune cells spot the foreigner and attack, inflaming the brain tissue and blocking communication between the electrode and the cells.

The new electrode developed by the teams of Daryl Kipke, a professor of biomedical engineering, Joerg Lahann, a professor of chemical engineering, and Nicholas Kotov, the Joseph B. and Florence V. Cejka professor of engineering, is unobtrusive and even friendly in comparison. It is a thread of highly conductive carbon fiber, coated in plastic to block out signals from other neurons. The conductive gel pad at the end cozies up to soft cell membranes, and that close connection means the signals from brain cells come in much clearer.

Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Brown University creates first wireless, implanted brain-computer interface

Brown University creates first wireless, implanted brain-computer interface | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Brown’s wireless BCI, fashioned out of hermetically sealed titanium, looks a lot like a pacemaker. Inside there’s a li-ion battery, an inductive (wireless) charging loop, a chip that digitizes the signals from your brain, and an antenna for transmitting those neural spikes to a nearby computer. The BCI is connected to a small chip with 100 electrodes protruding from it, which, in this study, was embedded in the somatosensory cortex or motor cortex. These 100 electrodes produce a lot of data, which the BCI transmits at 24Mbps over the 3.2 and 3.8GHz bands to a receiver that is one meter away. The BCI’s battery takes two hours to charge via wireless inductive charging, and then has enough juice to last for six hours of use.

more...
Nacho Vega's curator insight, March 5, 2013 5:10 AM

Where do we go?!!!

Gust MEES's curator insight, March 5, 2013 4:17 PM

 

These 100 electrodes produce a lot of data, which the BCI transmits at 24Mbps over the 3.2 and 3.8GHz bands to a receiver that is one meter away.

 

Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Rise of the cyborgs

Rise of the cyborgs | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Of all the powers that we have imagined for the cyborg, which do we most covet? Their ability to see and sense detail in the environment? The ability manipulate things with the dexterity and power of a machine? Or perhaps it would be to command vast amounts of information which can be processed at tremendous speed?
If you chose none of those, you chose as any cyborg likely would have. The cyborg’s greatest power, that from which it derives the most satisfaction (to use that term loosely), must be the ability to see itself.

more...
Alistair Parker's curator insight, January 14, 2013 7:08 PM

add your insight...

Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Theodore Berger: Neuroengineering - The Future is Now

Dr. Theodore Berger's research is currently focused primarily on the hippocampus, a neural system essential for learning and memory functions.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Welcome to the Mind-Meld: Our Future of Brain-to-Brain Communication

Welcome to the Mind-Meld: Our Future of Brain-to-Brain Communication | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

For as long as we humans have felt curious about the world around us, we’ve struggled to communicate our thoughts to others clearly and to understand them in turn; to “get inside their heads.” But it hasn’t been until the last couple years that each of us can put on a little plastic helmet and watch what’s happening inside our own brains – and the brains of our friends – right at home. What’s next but to truly get inside each others’ minds and see what we find there?

Technologies like these might seem to have the potential to make robots of us all – but they also hint at a future of empathy more direct and immediate than any we’ve experienced before.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Restoring paretic hand function via an artificial neural connection bridging spinal cord injury

Restoring paretic hand function via an artificial neural connection bridging spinal cord injury | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Functional loss of limb control in individuals with spinal cord injury or stroke can be caused by interruption of the neural pathways between brain and spinal cord, although the neural circuits located above and below the lesion remain functional. An artificial neural connection that bridges the lost pathway and connects brain to spinal circuits has potential to ameliorate the functional loss.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Will we ever… create the technology to read minds?

Will we ever… create the technology to read minds? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

There’s tantalising evidence that technology could one day allow us to transmit thoughts telepathically between two brains. The question is how far can we go?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

The Rise of the Cyborgs: The Incorporation of Machines into the Human Body

The Rise of the Cyborgs: The Incorporation of Machines into the Human Body | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

With rapidly evolving technology , it is inevitable that the future of humanity lies in machines. Traditionally, there has been a divide in the type of progress for humans to achieve an advanced state of being. On one hand, there are people who advocate the development of artificial intelligence technologies to imbue human cognitive abilities on robots. An alternate approach is one parallel to many science fiction fantasizes–the creation of cyborgs, or human-machine hybrids. The creation of cyborg technology has already been set in motion and this article will examine it’s evolution and benefits.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Szabolcs Kósa
Scoop.it!

Better than the Borg: The Neurotech Era

Better than the Borg: The Neurotech Era | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

What if you could read my mind? What if I could beam what I’m seeing, hearing, and thinking, straight to you, and vice versa? What if an implant could store your memories, augment them, and make you smarter?
Long the stuff of science fiction, technology that can directly tap into, augment, and connect human brains is becoming science fact. And that means big changes for all of us.

more...
No comment yet.