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Tracking the Future
Explore the most important technology and science trends! News, Analysis, Interviews, Presentations, Documentaries. All in one place at Tracking the future magazine
Curated by Szabolcs Kósa
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Between Ape and Artilect

Between Ape and Artilect | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

During 2010-12, noted AI researcher and long-time Humanity+ Board member Ben Goertzel conducted a series of textual interviews with researchers in various areas of cutting-edge science — artificial general intelligence, nanotechnology, life extension, neurotechnology, collective intelligence, mind uploading, body modification, neuro-spiritual transformation, and more. These interviews were published online in H+ Magazine, and are here gathered together in a single volume. The resulting series of dialogues treats a variety of social, futurological and scientific topics in a way that is accessible to the educated non-scientist, yet also deep and honest to the subtleties of the topics being discussed.

 

Between Ape and Artilect is a must-read if you want the real views, opinions, ideas, muses and arguments of the people creating our future.

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luiy's curator insight, March 8, 2014 2:34 PM

- Itamar Arel: AGI via Deep Learning 

- Pei Wang: What Do You Mean by “AI”? 
- Joscha Bach: Understanding the Mind
- Hugo DeGaris: Will There be Cyborgs?
- DeGaris Interviews Goertzel: Seeking the Sputnik of AGI 
- Linas Vepstas: AGI, Open Source and Our Economic Future 
- Joel Pitt: The Benefits of Open Source for AGI
- Randal Koene: Substrate-Independent Minds
- João Pedro de Magalhães: Ending Aging 
- Aubrey De Grey: Aging and AGI
- David Brin: Sousveillance
- J. Storrs Hall: Intelligent Nano Factories and Fogs
- Mohamad Tarifi: AGI and the Emerging Peer-to-Peer Economy 
- Michael Anissimov: The Risks of Artificial Superintelligence 
- Muehlhauser & Goertzel: Rationality, Risk, and the Future of AGI 
- Paul Werbos: Will Humanity Survive?
- Wendell Wallach: Machine Morality
- Francis Heylighen: The Emerging Global Brain 
- Steve Omohundro: The Wisdom of the Global Brain and the Future of AGI 
- Alexandra Elbakyan: Beyond the Borg 
- Giulio Prisco: Technological Transcendence 
- Zhou Changle: Zen and the Art of Intelligent Robotics 
- Hugo DeGaris: Is God an Alien Mathematician? 
- Lincoln Cannon: The Most Transhumanist Religion?
- Natasha Vita-More: Upgrading Humanity 
- Jeffery Martin & Mikey Siegel: Engineering Enlightenment 

aanve's curator insight, March 8, 2014 10:03 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Mlik Sahib's curator insight, March 8, 2014 10:40 PM

- Itamar Arel: AGI via Deep Learning 

- Pei Wang: What Do You Mean by “AI”? 
- Joscha Bach: Understanding the Mind
- Hugo DeGaris: Will There be Cyborgs?
- DeGaris Interviews Goertzel: Seeking the Sputnik of AGI 
- Linas Vepstas: AGI, Open Source and Our Economic Future 
- Joel Pitt: The Benefits of Open Source for AGI
- Randal Koene: Substrate-Independent Minds
- João Pedro de Magalhães: Ending Aging 
- Aubrey De Grey: Aging and AGI
- David Brin: Sousveillance
- J. Storrs Hall: Intelligent Nano Factories and Fogs
- Mohamad Tarifi: AGI and the Emerging Peer-to-Peer Economy 
- Michael Anissimov: The Risks of Artificial Superintelligence 
- Muehlhauser & Goertzel: Rationality, Risk, and the Future of AGI 
- Paul Werbos: Will Humanity Survive?
- Wendell Wallach: Machine Morality
- Francis Heylighen: The Emerging Global Brain 
- Steve Omohundro: The Wisdom of the Global Brain and the Future of AGI 
- Alexandra Elbakyan: Beyond the Borg 
- Giulio Prisco: Technological Transcendence 
- Zhou Changle: Zen and the Art of Intelligent Robotics 
- Hugo DeGaris: Is God an Alien Mathematician? 
- Lincoln Cannon: The Most Transhumanist Religion?
- Natasha Vita-More: Upgrading Humanity 
- Jeffery Martin & Mikey Siegel: Engineering Enlightenment 

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The Next Generation in Neural Prosthetics

The Next Generation in Neural Prosthetics | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Following up on the success of cochlear and retinal prostheses for people who have lost sensory function, neuroscientists see a limitless horizon for related devices that are able to read electrical and chemical signals from the nervous system to stimulate capability and restore quality of life in persons suffering injury and disease.

In the future, according to researchers, the devices – known as neural prosthetics – will help epileptics, persons with treatment-resistant depression and chronic pain, victims of Alzheimer’s disease, wounded war veterans suffering post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury, persons with speech disabilities, and individuals who have sustained spinal cord injury and loss of limbs, among other applications in the research pipeline.

But before neural prosthetics can advance, engineers will be called on to make innovative use of materials to design and fabricate devices that allow sustained electronic functioning in the harsh environment of the human body, without causing tissue infection and other serious adverse conditions. Research efforts have focused on enhancing the performance of various types of materials used in neural prosthetics, in addition to developing interface technologies that enable the micro devices to be safely implanted in human tissue for long periods.

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aanve's curator insight, March 1, 2014 10:05 PM

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Richard Platt's curator insight, March 2, 2014 11:46 AM

Very interesting wearable - on the inside of the body, - their big issue is having to solve the contradiction of stiff and flexible, turns out it is what is known as Physical Contradiction based on time.  Numerous inventive principles for solving that problem. 

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US military begins work on brain implants that can restore lost memories, experiences

US military begins work on brain implants that can restore lost memories, experiences | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

DARPA, at the behest of the US Department of Defense, is developing a black box brain implant — an implant that will be wired into a soldier’s brain and record their memories. If the soldier then suffers memory loss due to brain injury, the implant will then be used to restore those memories. The same implant could also be used during training or in the line of duty too, stimulating the right regions of the brain can improve how quickly you learn new skills, reduce your reaction times, and more.

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Grow a new brain: First steps to lab-made grey matter

Grow a new brain: First steps to lab-made grey matter | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Bioengineers dream of growing spare parts for our worn-out or diseased bodies. They have already succeeded with some tissues, but one has always eluded them: the brain. Now a team in Sweden has taken the first step towards this ultimate goal.

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DARPA Wants to Fix Broken Brains, Restore Lost Memories

DARPA Wants to Fix Broken Brains, Restore Lost Memories | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

At the Society for Neuroscience meeting earlier this month in San Diego, California, Science sat down with Geoffrey Ling, deputy director of the Defense Sciences Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), to discuss the agency’s plans for the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative, a neuroscience research effort put forth by President Barack Obama earlier this year. So far, DARPA has released two calls for grant applications, with at least one more likely: The first, calledSUBNETS (Systems-Based Neurotechnology for Emerging Therapies), asks researchers to develop novel, wireless devices, such as deep brain stimulators, that can cure neurological disorders such as posttraumatic stress (PTS), major depression, and chronic pain. The second,RAM (Restoring Active Memory), calls for a separate wireless device that repairs brain damage and restores memory loss.

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Carnegie Mellon Computer Searches Web 24/7 To Analyze Images and Teach Itself Common Sense

Carnegie Mellon Computer Searches Web 24/7 To Analyze Images and Teach Itself Common Sense | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

A computer program called the Never Ending Image Learner (NEIL) is running 24 hours a day at Carnegie Mellon University, searching the Web for images, doing its best to understand them on its own and, as it builds a growing visual database, gathering common sense on a massive scale.

NEIL leverages recent advances in computer vision that enable computer programs to identify and label objects in images, to characterize scenes and to recognize attributes, such as colors, lighting and materials, all with a minimum of human supervision. In turn, the data it generates will further enhance the ability of computers to understand the visual world.

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Synaptic Transistor Learns While it Computes

Synaptic Transistor Learns While it Computes | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Materials scientists at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have now created a new type of transistor that mimics the behavior of a synapse. The novel device simultaneously modulates the flow of information in a circuit and physically adapts to changing signals.

Exploiting unusual properties in modern materials, the synaptic transistor could mark the beginning of a new kind of artificial intelligence: one embedded not in smart algorithms but in the very architecture of a computer. 

 


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The Unlikely Network at the Core of Your Brain's Internet

The Unlikely Network at the Core of Your Brain's Internet | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it
Neuroscientists have identified a network of highly linked brain regions that could prove essential in integrating information and facilitating higher-order cognitive tasks.
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Biology Confronts Data Complexity

Biology Confronts Data Complexity | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

New technologies have launched the life sciences into the age of big data. Biologists must now make sense of their informational windfall.

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Gary Bamford's curator insight, October 21, 2013 1:53 AM

The very definition of 'complexity'!

Germán Morales's curator insight, October 22, 2013 11:26 AM

Tratar la vida como un cumulo de datos... qué se yo... estamos yendo a eso.

tatiyana fuentes's curator insight, October 24, 2013 8:49 AM

It was difficult to find sequence the human genome, but now it’s comparatively simple to compare genomes of the microorganisms living in our bodies, the ocean, the soil, and everywhere because of the new technologies. Life scientists are embarking on countless other big data projects, including efforts to analyze the genomes of many cancers, to map the human brain, and to develop better biofuels and other crops. Compared to fields like physics, astronomy and computer science that have been dealing with the challenges of massive datasets for decades, the big data revolution in biology has also been quick, leaving little time to adapt. Biologists must overcome a number of hurdles, from storing and moving data to integrating and analyzing it, which will require a substantial cultural shift.

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Human Brain Project: Henry Markram plans to spend €1bn building a perfect model of the human brain

Human Brain Project: Henry Markram plans to spend €1bn building a perfect model of the human brain | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Henry Markram tells how his son's autism fired his ambition to unlock the secrets of consciousness by using 'big data' to trace the electronic signals that zing between neurons

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Paul P Roberts's curator insight, October 16, 2013 5:36 AM

With a ten year time frame its arrival might be a little late for some in the research market but any outputs may change the way we view human behaviour and thus how we conduct market research.

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Changing brains: why neuroscience is ending the Prozac era

Changing brains: why neuroscience is ending the Prozac era | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The psychiatric drug age may have reached its peak. Although mind-altering medications are being prescribed in record numbers, signs of a radically new approach to understanding and treating mental illness are emerging from the deep waters of neuroscience. No longer focused on developing pills, a huge research effort is now devoted to altering the function of specific neural circuits by physical intervention in the brain.


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Joe Stafura's curator insight, September 23, 2013 10:30 AM

The pharma business is just one of the many areas where the new understanding of the brain changes the options; education, economics and policy development and business management are all areas that will be disrupted over the next decade. The greatest inertia to overcome is the desire of many to cling to superstitious or profitable scams that are attractive but ineffective except in the creation of profits.

Ziggi Ivan Santini's curator insight, October 2, 2013 6:16 AM

This is either exceedingly good news or extremely dangerous...

William baldwin's curator insight, January 4, 11:31 PM

Change the way we lead people through Brain Science

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As Machines Get Smarter, Evidence They Learn Like Us

As Machines Get Smarter, Evidence They Learn Like Us | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The brain performs its canonical task — learning — by tweaking its myriad connections according to a secret set of rules. To unlock these secrets, scientists 30 years ago began developing computer models that try to replicate the learning process. Now, a growing number of experiments are revealing that these models behave strikingly similar to actual brains when performing certain tasks. Researchers say the similarities suggest a basic correspondence between the brains’ and computers’ underlying learning algorithms.

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The machine of a new soul - Computers will help people to understand brains better. And understanding brains will help people to build better computers.

The machine of a new soul - Computers will help people to understand brains better. And understanding brains will help people to build better computers. | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Analogies change. Once, it was fashionable to describe the brain as being like the hydraulic systems employed to create pleasing fountains for 17th-century aristocrats’ gardens. As technology moved on, first the telegraph network and then the telephone exchange became the metaphor of choice. Now it is the turn of the computer. But though the brain-as-computer is, indeed, only a metaphor, one group of scientists would like to stand that metaphor on its head. Instead of thinking of brains as being like computers, they wish to make computers more like brains. This way, they believe, humanity will end up not only with a better understanding of how the brain works, but also with better, smarter computers.
These visionaries describe themselves as neuromorphic engineers. Their goal, according to Karlheinz Meier, a physicist at the University of Heidelberg who is one of their leaders, is to design a computer that has some—and preferably all—of three characteristics that brains have and computers do not.

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Technology Is Completely Upending the Traditional Idea of the Self

Technology Is Completely Upending the Traditional Idea of the Self | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

A qualitative change in our information environment that is every bit as seismic as the meteor that marked the end of the dinosaurs. Deity-scale information capability. Complexity driving cognition to ever more competent techno-human networks. Perceptual, conscious, and subconscious processing increasingly outsourced to technology systems. Fragmentation of self across avatars in various increasingly engaging virtual realities. But any such list is misleadingly simplistic. The technological evolution impacting the self is not simply a case of interesting but isolated case studies but, rather, represents profound and accelerating evolution across the entire technological frontier. And the conscious self is where these must be integrated, or at least collated.

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AR helps amputee experience first pain-free night in 48 years

AR helps amputee experience first pain-free night in 48 years | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

An augmented reality game has helped an amputee suffering from phantom limb pain (PLP) enjoy a good night's sleep for the first time in 48 years.

The system, which works by translating muscular electrical signals picked up by electrodes at the site of the amputation into movements onscreen, was developed by a team at the Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg and nearby Sahlgrenska University Hospital. It is an offshoot of work done by Max Ortiz Catalan, who in 2012 developed and trialled a groundbreaking technique for implanting thought-controlled robotic arms and their electrodes directly to the bones and nerves of amputees. He says the idea for the AR phantom pain system came from listening to the struggles of amputee patients at his own clinic. When he decided to trial it, there was one individual whose case was known to be particularly difficult. 

The effects of the trial, have been transformative for that individual. 

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Scientists improve human self-control through electrical brain stimulation

Scientists improve human self-control through electrical brain stimulation | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Neuroscientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and the University of California, San Diego, have successfully demonstrated a technique to enhance a form of self-control through a novel form of brain stimulation.

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A Cybernetic Implant That Repairs Brain Damage

A Cybernetic Implant That Repairs Brain Damage | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

There may be an answer for people suffering from traumatic brain injuries. It's a device called a brain-machine-brain interface — and it has the potential to revolutionize the way brain damage is treated in humans.

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Theodore Berger: Neuroengineering - The Future is Now

Dr. Theodore Berger's research is currently focused primarily on the hippocampus, a neural system essential for learning and memory functions.

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Tuning the Brain

Tuning the Brain | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Deep-brain stimulation is allowing neurosurgeons to adjust the neural activity in specific brain regions to treat thousands of patients with myriad neurological disorders.

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Steve Kingsley's curator insight, November 9, 2013 2:34 PM

Now, if we can make deep-brain stimulation a physically non-invasive procedure... 

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Is a scientific definition of consciousness possible?

Is a scientific definition of consciousness possible? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

UCLA psychologists have used brain-imaging techniques to study what happens to the human brain when it slips into unconsciousness.

Their research, published in the online open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology, is an initial step toward developing a scientific definition of consciousness, the researchers say.

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Brain decoding: Reading minds

Brain decoding: Reading minds | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

By scanning blobs of brain activity, scientists may be able to decode people's thoughts, their dreams and even their intentions.

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Finally, a Way to Read Minds

Finally, a Way to Read Minds | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

For now, the technique applies to quantitative thinking (doing math problems and calculating numbers) but the process could launch ways of reading other types of thoughts as well. The new research, published in Nature Communications, was the first to “read the minds” of patients who were not simply engaging in lab experiments but were going about their daily lives, albeit in a hospital where they were awaiting surgery. The patients, who had epilepsy, volunteered to have electrodes placed on the surface of their brains in order to determine what region was causing their seizures and whether the dysfunctional regions could be safely removed with surgery.

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Covert operations: Your brain digitally remastered for clarity of thought

Covert operations: Your brain digitally remastered for clarity of thought | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Stephen LaConte, an assistant professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, says brain-computer interfaces now enable us to eavesdrop on previously undetectable mental activities.

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Louie Helm's curator insight, October 5, 2013 4:29 AM

Researchers find a straightforward way to improve signal-to-noise ratio of brain measurements.

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How to make a brain perceive an exoskeleton as its new body

How to make a brain perceive an exoskeleton as its new body | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Miguel Nicolelis is a man with a lot of pressure on his shoulders. Since claiming that he will build the robotic exoskeletal suit that enables a paraplegic to perform the opening kickoff during the next world cup, he has been scrambling to make good on his self-imposed mandate. By all measures, he has logged several important advances en route to that goal this year alone. The latest offering from his lab at Duke provides an important link into how an exoskeleton will be incorporated at the cortical level, into the so-called body schema. In other words, how the mind comes to perceive its new self.

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New brain scanning technique can visualize your imagination

New brain scanning technique can visualize your imagination | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

This week a team of Dutch researchers announced that a combination of high-resolution MRI, computational modeling, and a little bit of deck-stacking prescience has allowed them to draw a subject’s experiences right out of the brain. The study builds on years of research into how visual and cognitive information is represented in the brain, and its biggest step forward is actually more conceptual than technological.

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