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Tracking the Future
Explore the most important technology and science trends! News, Analysis, Interviews, Presentations, Documentaries. All in one place at Tracking the future magazine
Curated by Szabolcs Kósa
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Gabor Forgacs: "We live in a time when it is really difficult to say: "This is impossible!""

Dr. Gabor Forgacs is a theoretical physicist turned tissue-engineer turned entrepreneur. His companies are pioneering 3D bio-printing technologies that will produce tissues for medical and pharmaceutical uses, as well as for consumption, in the form of meat and leather.

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Can Artificial Meat Save The World?

Can Artificial Meat Save The World? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Traditional chicken, beef, and pork production devours resources and creates waste. Meat-free meat might be the solution. 

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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, November 26, 2013 2:02 AM

It is increasingly clear that these "optional" choices for syntheic meat/food stuffs will soon become central to the caloric and nutritional needs for a good chunk of the globe's population.

Brainbyte's curator insight, December 31, 2013 12:08 AM

http://www.articlesbase.com/web-design-articles/how-to-make-attractive-website-design-6876004.html

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Changing the Global Food Narrative

Changing the Global Food Narrative | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

There’s a powerful narrative being told about the world’s food system — in classrooms, boardrooms, foundations and the halls of government around the world. It’s everywhere. And it makes complete sense when you listen to it. The problem is, it’s mostly based on flawed assumptions.

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Synthetic Biology: Engineered Plants Create Their Own Fertilizer

Synthetic Biology: Engineered Plants Create Their Own Fertilizer | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Since man discovered agriculture, farmers have used ingenious ways to pump more nitrogen into crop fields; farmers have planted legumes and plowed the entire crop under, strewn night soil or manure on the fields, shipped in bat dung from islands in the Pacific or saltpeter from Chilean mines and plowed in glistening granules of synthetic fertilizer made in chemical plants. 
A new Washington University in St. Louis project seeks to miniaturize, automate and relocate the chemical apparatus for nitrogen fixation within the plant so nitrogen is available when and where it is needed — and only then and there.
“That would really revolutionize agriculture,” said Himadri Pakrasi, PhD, the Myron and Sonya Glassberg/Albert and Blanche Greensfelder Distinguished University Professor, in Arts&Sciences, and director of the International Center for Advanced Renewable Energy and Sustainability (I-CARES) at Washington University in St. Louis.

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The Vertical Farm: A Keystone Concept for the the Ecocity

Dr. Dickson Despommier was born in New Orleans in 1940, and grew up in California before moving to the New York area, where he now lives and works. He has a PhD in microbiology from the University of Notre Dame. For 27 years, he has conducted laboratory-based biomedical research at Columbia University with NIH-sponsored support. He is now an emeritus professor at Columbia University and adjunct professor at Fordham University.
At present, Dr. Despommier is engaged in a project with the mission to produce significant amounts of food crops in tall buildings situated in densely populated urban centers. This initiative has grown in acceptance over the last few years to the point of stimulating planners and developers around the world to incorporate them into their vision for the future city. To date, there are vertical farms up and running in Japan, Korea, Singapore, Seattle, and Chicago, with many more in the planning stage. It is his hope that vertical farming will become commonplace throughout the built environment on a global scale.

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Inside the meat lab: the future of food

Inside the meat lab: the future of food | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

With billions of mouths to feed, we can't go on producing food in the traditional way. Scientists are coming up with novel ways to cater for future generations. In-vitro burger, anyone?

 


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What will we be eating in 20 years' time?

What will we be eating in 20 years' time? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Volatile food prices and a growing population mean we have to rethink what we eat, say food futurologists. So what might we be serving up in 20 years' time?

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What The Global Food Supply Will Look Like In 2021

What The Global Food Supply Will Look Like In 2021 | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Your food consumption might look quite a bit different a decade from now. Colony collapse disorder, foodborne disease outbreaks, and climate change are just some of the factors that are making our collective food future increasingly uncertain.

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Richard Resnick: Welcome to the genomic revolution

In this accessible talk from TEDxBoston, Richard Resnick shows how cheap and fast genome sequencing is about to turn health care (and insurance, and politics) upside down.

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The future of food

The future of food | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

When three continents witnessed food riots in 2007 and 2008, we saw the international food system is not as stable as it looks. There’s unprecedented competition for food due to population growth and changing diets. Experts predict that by 2050, if things don't change, we will see mass starvation across the world.

In this documentary, George Alagiah travelled the world to unravel the complicated web of links that binds the world's food together, bringing it from farm to table. It reveals a growing global food crisis that could affect the planet in the years ahead. What can we do to avert this?

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Austin R Stillwell's comment, March 15, 11:44 PM
{title}-The future of food.{author}- BBC.{summary}-experts predict that by 2050, if things don't change, we will see mass starvation across the world.- a growing global food crisis could affect the planet in the years ahead.-the international food system is not as stable as it looks.{opinion?}-no, this is factual.{important?}yes, if we don't change our habits we could run out.{source}-http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20140206-the-future-of-food
Mason Mclaughlin's comment, March 23, 9:26 PM
<br>Title: The future of food Author: BBC Date: 2-7-14 Main Idea: We might be heading to a food crisis. Summary: There is competition for food. In the last few years there has been a food crisis. Lots of food in rich countries. Questions: Why is there not enough food? Opinions: We need to change food Importance: important we might be running out of food Sources:http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20140206-the-future-of-food
Celest Ybarra's curator insight, March 29, 9:25 PM

Title: The Future of Food

Author: BBC

Main Idea: Prediction that if eating habits don't change now, there will be a mass food scarce in the future

Summary:

1) The world is constantly changing and evolving over time, and if things don't change soon then we could be in serious trouble

2) A growing global crisis means that's there's competition for food and could affect the planet years ahead

3) Since food has become a commodity in other countries it makes it hard to believe that we could possibly run out in the future

Opinion: No, its factual.

Question: Why do researchers believe this theory? How can we help change this idea?

Is this article important to science?: Yes, because it can help us figure out how to not make this come true since food is such an important factor, and key, to our survival.

Source: http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20140206-the-future-of-food

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What are the environmental consequences of growing the food supply to feed the world in 2050?

What are the environmental consequences of growing the food supply to feed the world in 2050? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The most recent UN estimates show global population stabilizing at 9-10 billion sometime after 2050. What will it take to feed these additional 2-3 billion people?

While forecasting anything 40 years in the future is a treacherous task, estimates typically place the required expansion of the food at double current production levels in 2050.


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usman's curator insight, November 23, 2013 6:07 AM

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The Future Is Cockroaches: Hacking, Mass-Producing, and Eating the World's Vilest Insect

The Future Is Cockroaches: Hacking, Mass-Producing, and Eating the World's Vilest Insect | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Thus far, cockroaches have existed primarily to repulse squeamish humans when they scuttle out from under the world's old floorboards. They comfortably edge mosquitos out to earn the mantle of the world's most reviled insect; when the rising tides and mushroom clouds finally chase us into oblivion, the cockroaches, it's often said, will inherit the earth.

But the future of cockroaches is nigh, and they won't just be fodder for post-apocalyptic nightmares and the bottom of our shoes much longer. Around the globe, we're harvesting cockroaches for nutrition, growing them on farms, and turning them into cyborgs. The future, in other words, is going to be even more full of cockroaches than it is today.

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Farming Nemo: How Aquaculture Will Feed 9 Billion Hungry People

Farming Nemo: How Aquaculture Will Feed 9 Billion Hungry People | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Shrimp fountains don't grow on trees, you know—nor do Ahi Tuna steaks, Fish McBites, or fried calamari. But that hasn't stopped an increasingly affluent human population from annually demanding more and more seafood. As a result, an estimated 85 percent of the ocean's fish stocks are now either fully exploited or overfished. But an ancient form of aquatic farming, and current $60 billion-a-year industry, may hold the key to both protecting wild fish populations and your local sushi shop.

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Will 3D Printers Make Your Meals?

Will 3D Printers Make Your Meals? | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

These days, 3D printers are laying down plastics, metals, resins, and other materials in whatever configurations creative people can dream up. But when the next 3D printing revolution comes, you'll be able to eat it. 

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Accelerated returns in food production

Accelerated returns in food production | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

Ray Kurzweil’s “law of accelerating returns” is a very viable economic theory that can be used to address many of the issues that economists are facing in our times, but unfortunately most university departments of economics pay very little attention to it, whereas the old economic theories are not able to answer issues that global economy has been facing since the inception of computer revolution of the last thirty years.

In fact, when the global economy is struggling with issues such as chronic unemployment and the traditional economists are consulted about it, their answers are repeating the same solutions that have failed over and over again, whereas Kurzweil’s theory opens a new way of thinking to fix the economy.

It may be a good idea to address specific issues from the angle of the law of accelerated returns and ask economists to respond and start a dialogue on this new futurist approach of Kurzweil to seek solutions for the problems facing humanity in our times. Challenges of food production in the global economy, at the time when some countries in Africa are facing famine year after year, show the need for a new understanding to help us to come up with working solutions.

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Ramen by HP? The Wild Possibilities Of Printing Food

Ramen by HP? The Wild Possibilities Of Printing Food | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

The Cornell Creative Machines Lab wants to bring 3-D food printing technology to restaurants and home chefs. Top culinary talents believe this could lead to healthier diets, not just snazzier snacks.

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The future of food

The future of food | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

How can we feed the 2.5 billion more people – an extra China and India – likely to be alive in 2050? The UN says we will have to nearly double our food production and governments say we should adopt new technologies and avoid waste, but however you cut it, there are already one billion chronically hungry people, there's little more virgin land to open up, climate change will only make farming harder to grow food in most places, the oceans are overfished, and much of the world faces growing water shortages.

Fifty years ago, when the world's population was around half what it is now, the answer to looming famines was "the green revolution" – a massive increase in the use of hybrid seeds and chemical fertilisers. It worked, but at a great ecological price. We grow nearly twice as much food as we did just a generation ago, but we use three times as much water from rivers and underground supplies.

Food, farm and water technologists will have to find new ways to grow more crops in places that until now were hard or impossible to farm. It may need a total rethink over how we use land and water. So enter a new generation of radical farmers, novel foods and bright ideas.

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The limits of farming

The limits of farming | Tracking the Future | Scoop.it

BY THE year 2050, Earth will be home to another 2 or 3 billion more people. The most vexing question is: How will we feed them all? Not only will there be more people, but everyone will have more money to spend on food. Where, on this ever more crowded planet, will we grow all of it?

By 2050, the world’s farmers will need to supply almost twice as much food as they do today, according to an analysis by the World Wildlife Fund. Put another way, we will need to produce as much food in the next 40 years as have in the last 8,000.

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