Towards Singularity
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Neurogames are Ready to Take Flight — Expect a Breakout Year Ahead - Singularity Hub

Neurogames are Ready to Take Flight — Expect a Breakout Year Ahead - Singularity Hub | Towards Singularity | Scoop.it
Singularity Hub Neurogames are Ready to Take Flight — Expect a Breakout Year Ahead Singularity Hub In just three words, Palmer Luckey of OculusVR fame, perfectly summarized not only where virtual reality stands, but perhaps the entire neurogaming...
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CNN’s Spurlock Inside Man explores extreme life extension | KurzweilAI

CNN’s Spurlock Inside Man explores extreme life extension | KurzweilAI | Towards Singularity | Scoop.it
(Credit: CNN) In Futurism, an episode in CNN's original series Morgan Spurlock Inside Man on Sunday April 20, Spurlock enters the brave new world of
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Hope to have the time to experience his zeal

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The Singularity and Socialism - Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies

The Singularity and Socialism - Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies | Towards Singularity | Scoop.it
The Singularity and Socialism Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies Kurzweil justifies his belief in the inevitability of a technological singularity with the law of accelerating returns, a tendency for the exponential increase of...
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Apple co-founder on smart watches: 'I want the entire internet on my wrist' - The Guardian

Apple co-founder on smart watches: 'I want the entire internet on my wrist' - The Guardian | Towards Singularity | Scoop.it
The Guardian
Apple co-founder on smart watches: 'I want the entire internet on my wrist'
The Guardian
They're starting with … displays that are the size of the iPod nano, which is the size of an ordinary watch of the past.
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Let's curb our 3D-printer enthusiasm - Sydney Morning Herald

Let's curb our 3D-printer enthusiasm - Sydney Morning Herald | Towards Singularity | Scoop.it
Sydney Morning Herald
Let's curb our 3D-printer enthusiasm
Sydney Morning Herald
That is the way exponential technologies usually go. Expectations get raised when people first read about a technological breakthrough.
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New Computer Programming Language Imitates The Human Brain

New Computer Programming Language Imitates The Human Brain | Towards Singularity | Scoop.it
As we pointed out earlier this week, we’re still far from being able to replicate the awesome power of the human brain.
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Technology uses signals all around us to communicate, no power needed

Technology uses signals all around us to communicate, no power needed | Towards Singularity | Scoop.it
A new communication technique can let wireless devices talk to each other without needing batteries, researchers at the University of Washington say.
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MIT: The Post-Singularity Future Of Astronomy

MIT: The Post-Singularity Future Of Astronomy | Towards Singularity | Scoop.it

Astronomy could be the first discipline in which the rate of discovery by machines outpaces humans’ ability to interpret it.

 

“In twenty years time, it is likely that most astronomers will never go near a cutting-edge telescope,” says Ray Norris at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation in Epping, Australia. So begins a fascinating discussion about the future of humanity’s oldest science.

 

Norris paints an optimistic picture. For him, the future is filled with automation that will make astronomers’ jobs easier. He says, for example, that in twenty years time: “I expect to be able to click on an object in a paper, and see its image at all wavelengths.” This data will be provided more or less automatically by a new generation of smart telescopes that calibrate and edit data on the fly and then send it to a Virtual Observatory that anybody can access.

 

The job for astronomers will be to theorise about this data, to look for patterns within it and to see how it explains some problems and creates others. They might then suggest what other data to collect. That should free up much of their time. Norris says the time not spent fiddling with equitorial mounts and lens cloths will allow them up to better engage with the public who pay their wages.

 

That’s certainly a reasonable change from what astronomers do today but has Norris gone far enough? One thing he fails to take into account is the newfound ability of computers to analyse data in ways entirely inaccessible to humans. Last year, Hod Lipson and pals at Cornell University developed a genetic algorithm capable of sifting through data looking for the laws of physics behind it.

 

And it seems to work. These guys generated a load of data by tracking the motion of things like simple harmonic oscillators and chaotic double-pendulums. They then set their algorithm loose on the raw data–not the manicured stuff but the warts’n’all measurements.

 

Their jaw-dropping result is that their algorithm derived Newton’s laws of motion from this data, without outside help. Since then, they’ve been inundated with requests to let their algorithm loose on other data sets. They’ve even set up a website where anybody can try it for themselves.

 

That’s quite an eye-opener. One problem is that the algorithm doesn’t always throw up well known results like Newton’s laws. And that leaves scientists puzzling over the mathematical relations that it reveals. What do they mean? How should they be interpreted? Are they important?

 

This should be of more than passing interest to astronomers. As Norris points out, astronomers are in the process of automating their work, to the point where the only task left to them is to analyse the data. And yet, Lipson’s work at Cornell indicates that even this can be automated too.

 

What Norris has failed to take into account is what will happen when Lipson’s algorithm, or something like it, is set to work on the corpus of data in the Virtual Observatory. The likelihood is that these algorithms will become powerful tools for discovering relationships in data that humans would find difficult to extract. That leaves astronomers with the task of puzzling over the results, sometimes understanding them but perhaps more often, not knowing what the newfound relations mean or why they hold.

 

This is a post singularity-type scenario, in which the machines make discoveries at a rate that humans cannot keep up with. Of course, astronomers are not the only scientists with this fate in store. But as the ones who have more or less automated their jobs already, they’re likely to be the ones who come up against it first.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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New technology offers 3D images inside colon, pointing toward better colonoscopy

New technology offers 3D images inside colon, pointing toward better colonoscopy | Towards Singularity | Scoop.it

MIT researchers have developed a new endoscopy technology that could make it easier for doctors to detect precancerous lesions in the colon. Early detection of such lesions has been shown to reduce death rates from colorectal cancer, which kills about 50,000 people per year in the United States.

The new technique, known as photometric stereo endoscopy, can capture topographical images of the colon surface along with traditional two-dimensional images. Such images make it easier to see precancerous growths, including flatter lesions that traditional endoscopy usually misses, says Nicholas Durr, a research fellow in the Madrid-MIT M+Vision Consortium, a recently formed community of medical researchers in Boston and Madrid.

 

“In conventional colonoscopy screening, you look for these characteristic large polyps that grow into the lumen of the colon, which are relatively easy to see,” Durr says. “However, a lot of studies in the last few years have shown that more subtle, nonpolypoid lesions can also cause cancer.”

 

In the United States, colonoscopies are recommended beginning at age 50, and are credited with reducing the risk of death from colorectal cancer by about half. Traditional colonoscopy uses endoscopes with fiber-optic cameras to capture images.

Durr and his colleagues, seeking medical problems that could be solved with new optical technology, realized that there was a need to detect lesions that colonoscopy can miss. A technique called chromoendoscopy, in which a dye is sprayed in the colon to highlight topographical changes, offers better sensitivity but is not routinely used because it takes too long.

 

“What is attractive about this technique for colonoscopy is that it provides an added dimension of diagnostic information, particularly about three-dimensional morphology on the surface of the colon,” says Nimmi Ramanujam, a professor of biological engineering at Duke University who was not part of the research team.

The researchers built two prototypes — one 35 millimeters in diameter, which would be too large to use for colonoscopy, and one 14 millimeters in diameter, the size of a typical colonoscope. In tests with an artificial silicon colon, the researchers found that both prototypes could create 3-D representations of polyps and flatter lesions. 

The new technology should be easily incorporated into newer endoscopes, Durr says. “A lot of existing colonoscopes already have multiple light sources,” he says. “From a hardware perspective all they need to do is alternate the lights and then update their software to process this photometric data.” 

The researchers plan to test the technology in human patients in clinical trials at MGH and the Hospital Clinico San Carlos in Madrid. They are also working on additional computer algorithms that could help to automate the process of identifying polyps and lesions from the topographical information generated by the new system. 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Top 10 Singularitarians of All Time

Top 10 Singularitarians of All Time | Towards Singularity | Scoop.it
Do you want to find out who are the most famous singularitarians of all time? Check this out…
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Google Glass to Be Covered by Vision Care Insurer VSP

Google Glass to Be Covered by Vision Care Insurer VSP | Towards Singularity | Scoop.it
In a sign of how wearable devices are entering the mainstream, a major optical insurance provider will subsidize frames and prescription lenses for customers buying Google Glass.
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Who's being the first in the Netherlands ;-) ????

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Customizable Robot: Intel Makes Science Fiction A Reality

Customizable Robot: Intel Makes Science Fiction A Reality | Towards Singularity | Scoop.it
The Guardian
Apple co-founder on smart watches: 'I want the entire internet on my wrist'
The Guardian
They're starting with … displays that are the size of the iPod nano, which is the size of an ordinary watch of the past.
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Quantum Computing: Where This New Technology Is Headed This Decade, Part 1 - LinkedIn Today

Quantum Computing: Where This New Technology Is Headed This Decade, Part 1 - LinkedIn Today | Towards Singularity | Scoop.it
Quantum Computing: Where This New Technology Is Headed This Decade, Part 1
LinkedIn Today
Forty years ago, Gordon Moore of Intel Corporation observed that the number of transistors on a silicon chip was doubling every year.
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Singularity 1 on 1: We have to protect privacy globally or we protect it nowhere! - Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies

Singularity 1 on 1: We have to protect privacy globally or we protect it nowhere! - Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies | Towards Singularity | Scoop.it
Singularity 1 on 1: We have to protect privacy globally or we protect it nowhere!
Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies
During our 45 minute conversation with Dr.
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New technology helps paralyzed patients walk - ABC 4

New technology helps paralyzed patients walk - ABC 4 | Towards Singularity | Scoop.it
New technology helps paralyzed patients walk
ABC 4
Images. SALT LAKE CITY (ABC 4 News) - Paralyzed patients are now one step closer to walking again thanks to new technology at the University of Utah Hospital.
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Humanlike robot hands controlled by brain activity arouse illusion of ownership in operators : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group

Humanlike robot hands controlled by brain activity arouse illusion of ownership in operators : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group | Towards Singularity | Scoop.it
Operators of a pair of robotic hands report ownership for those hands when they hold image of a grasp motion and watch the robot perform it.
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Exponential Technology Literacy: Neil Jacobstein at TEDxSanMigueldeAllende

Niell Jacobstein of NASA's Singularity University describes how artificial intelligence will change the world. Neil Jacobstein Co-chairs the Artificial Intel...
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Adoptive T Cell Transfer for Cancer Immunotherapy in the Era of Synthetic Biology

Adoptive T Cell Transfer for Cancer Immunotherapy in the Era of Synthetic Biology | Towards Singularity | Scoop.it

Via Gerd Moe-Behrens
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Gerd Moe-Behrens's curator insight, July 30, 2013 5:49 PM

by
Michael Kalos, Carl H. June

"Adoptive T cell transfer for cancer and chronic infection is an emerging field that shows promise in recent trials. Synthetic-biology-based engineering of T lymphocytes to express high-affinity antigen receptors can overcome immune tolerance, which has been a major limitation of immunotherapy-based strategies. Advances in cell engineering and culture approaches to enable efficient gene transfer and ex vivo cell expansion have facilitated broader evaluation of this technology, moving adoptive transfer from a “boutique” application to the cusp of a mainstream technology. The major challenge currently facing the field is to increase the specificity of engineered T cells for tumors, because targeting shared antigens has the potential to lead to on-target off-tumor toxicities, as observed in recent trials. As the field of adoptive transfer technology matures, the major engineering challenge is the development of automated cell culture systems, so that the approach can extend beyond specialized academic centers and become widely available."

 http://bit.ly/13XvnxT