Totalmente Natura
Follow
371 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from Zones humides - Ramsar - Océans
Scoop.it!

▶ Journée mondiale des zones humides 2014 : déclaration de Christopher Briggs


Via Hubert MESSMER @Zehub on Twitter, Pescalune
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from Oceans and Wildlife
Scoop.it!

White Wolf: Wolf Battlefield : What life is really like for the Wolf Pack in the wild. (Video)

White Wolf: Wolf Battlefield : What life is really like for the Wolf Pack in the wild. (Video) | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it
The survival of wolf populations by teaching about wolves, their relationship to wildlands.Find beautiful Videos creations, photographie,wolf wisdom,quotes,wolf poetry,native american legends.

Via Wildlife Defence
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from Zones humides - Ramsar - Océans
Scoop.it!

[Vidéo] Profession : sauveteur de corail à Bora Bora

[Vidéo] Profession : sauveteur de corail à Bora Bora | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it

Denis Schneider est biologiste marin sur l'île polynésienne. Son métier consiste à tenter de sauver les coraux, menacés par les changements climatiques.


Via L'Info Autrement, Pescalune
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from Oceans and Wildlife
Scoop.it!

New technique helps biologists save the world's threatened seagrass meadows

New technique helps biologists save the world's threatened seagrass meadows | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it
Danish and Australian biologists have developed a technique to determine if seagrass contain sulfur. If the seagrass contains sulfur, it is an indication that the seabed is stressed and that the water environment is threatened.

Via Wildlife Defence
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from Zones humides - Ramsar - Océans
Scoop.it!

La mer, qu’on voit chauffer…

La mer, qu’on voit chauffer… | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it

L’océan est particulièrement touché par les changements climatiques et leurs conséquences: il se réchauffe, prend plus de place. Mais il devient aussi moins accueillant pour la faune et la flore marines.


Via Pescalune
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

The Exclusion Zone: Inside the Most Radioactive Place in the World

The Exclusion Zone: Inside the Most Radioactive Place in the World | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it

In the wee hours of an April morning some 27 years ago, the nearly 50,000 residents of the Soviet city of Pripyat slept soundly as the worst nuclear disaster in history unfurled just down the street. Less than two miles away, a reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant erupted, sending a plume of radioactive material spiraling into the atmosphere. The resulting reactor fire burned for 10 days, spewing 20 Hiroshima bombs-worth of radioactive material across the environment and into animals, crops, and water sources, contaminating them, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

 

In the subsequent years the IAEA estimates that 336,000 people would be evacuated or relocated from the most irradiated areas surrounding the plant, 116,000 of which were evacuated by the end of the summer of 1986. But the residents of Pripyat had just 36 hours -- 36 hours to abandon everything they knew, leaving the city's streets to rot and decay under the weight of the elements. 

 

Now, long after the radioactive dust had settled, fine art photographer Philip Grossman returned to the area to document a different side of the incident, the cleanup. His work, "500,000 Voices," highlights the more than half a million workers, known as liquidators, who flooded the disaster site after the explosion, risking their lives to minimize the environmental hazards of mass nuclear contamination. 

 

"Everything in the city is contaminated," said Grossman. "They moved as fast as they could to clean up, packing all the material that was radioactive into garbage bags and trucks and burying it."

 

Grossman, who also works as a senior director of content acquisition for The Weather Channel, has visited the area three times, drawing inspiration for his work from the unique setting of his childhood. "I grew up near Three Mile Island, so I've always had a fascination with what happened there, as well as what happened in Chernobyl," said Grossman. "I wanted to go to Chernobyl and do something that few people can, or want to do."

 

Grossman's work exhibits an exclusive flair; bribes and insider connections have helped Grossman make the most of his 24 days in the zone. On his first trip, Grossman gained access to the control room of reactor number four. On subsequent trips Grossman reached the top of nearly every structure in Pripyat, including the iconic Ferris wheel in the heart of the city, and the Fujiyama building, the tallest structure in the abandoned city. In all, Grossman's work covers nearly every square inch of the exclusion zone, painting an eerie picture of the environmental fallout of a nuclear catastrophe

Maybe no site encapsulates the environmental impact of the Chernobyl meltdown more than the Red Forest. In the immediate aftermath of the explosion, the four-square-kilometer-stretch of pine trees just outside the walls of the power plant absorbed 80 to 100 Grays of gamma radiation, according to the IAEA, enough to kill all of the trees and leave the rotting stumps a reddish-brown hue. In response, the hoards of liquidators leveled most of the forest, burying irradiated trees under layers of sediment in massive trenches. The confines of the Red Forest were then re-imagined as a massive graveyard for contaminated materials -- helicopters, trucks, bodies, soil, anything exposed to radiation -- were all dumped en masse. Even though the Red Forest has since regrown, the area remains one of the most radioactive environments in the world; levels of radiation in the forest can reach 1 roentgen, 50,000 times greater than average background radiation levels, according to the IAEA.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuliano Cipollari
Scoop.it!

LOOK: Where B.C.'s Wild Things Are

LOOK: Where B.C.'s Wild Things Are | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it
Wildlife is a serious business in B.C. — from whale watching to eagle counting, there are numerous opportunities to get up close and personal with these beautiful beasts.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Physicists Debate Whether the World Is Made of Particles or Fields or Something Else Entirely

Physicists Debate Whether the World Is Made of Particles or Fields or Something Else Entirely | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it

It stands to reason that particle physics is about particles, and most people have a mental image of little billiard balls caroming around space. Yet the concept of “particle” falls apart on closer inspection.Many physicists think that particles are not things at all but excitations in a quantum field, the modern successor of classical fields such as the magnetic field. But fields, too, are paradoxical.If neither particles nor fields are fundamental, then what is? Some researchers think that the world, at root, does not consist of material things but of relations or of properties, such as mass, charge and spin.

 

Physicists routinely describe the universe as being made of tiny subatomic particles that push and pull on one another by means of force fields. They call their subject “particle physics” and their instruments “particle accelerators.” They hew to a Lego-like model of the world. But this view sweeps a little-known fact under the rug: the particle interpretation of quantum physics, as well as the field interpretation, stretches our conventional notions of “particle” and “field” to such an extent that ever more people think the world might be made of something else entirely.

 

The problem is not that physicists lack a valid theory of the subatomic realm. They do have one: it is called quantum field theory. Theorists developed it between the late 1920s and early 1950s by merging the earlier theory of quantum mechanics with Einstein's special theory of relativity. Quantum field theory provides the conceptual underpinnings of the Standard Model of particle physics, which describes the fundamental building blocks of matter and their interactions in one common framework. In terms of empirical precision, it is the most successful theory in the history of science. Physicists use it every day to calculate the aftermath of particle collisions, the synthesis of matter in the big bang, the extreme conditions inside atomic nuclei, and much besides.

 

So it may come as a surprise that physicists are not even sure what the theory says—what its “ontology,” or basic physical picture, is. This confusion is separate from the much discussed mysteries of quantum mechanics, such as whether a cat in a sealed box can be both alive and dead at the same time.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from Annie Haven | Haven Brand
Scoop.it!

Farmers' Almanac Gardening Calendar

Farmers' Almanac Gardening Calendar | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it
A calendar of best days to garden and do other yard chores according to the Farmers' Almanac's 200-year-old formula.

Via ManureTea Since 1924
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from World Environment Nature News
Scoop.it!

Power Infrastructure and Climate Change: US Gov. Report – Greg ...

Power Infrastructure and Climate Change: US Gov. Report – Greg ... | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it
But with climate change, the sunniness and windiness patterns are shifting, so we can easily get that wrong. Electricity transmission systems ten to get blotto'ed because of big storms, and flooding and drought can affect both ...

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from Zones humides - Ramsar - Océans
Scoop.it!

Bioluminescence et mouvement de masses d'eau en Méditerranée

Bioluminescence et mouvement de masses d'eau en Méditerranée | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it
En 2009 et 2010, le télescope sous-marin Antares a observé un étrange phénomène: la bioluminescence due aux organismes abyssaux a brusquement augmenté. Ceci a permis de révéler un lien inattendu entre une activité biologique – la bioluminescence – et le mouvement de masses d'eau en milieu profond. 

Via Pescalune
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from Zones humides - Ramsar - Océans
Scoop.it!

Le 139e Site Ramsar du Mexique

Le 139e Site Ramsar du Mexique | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it

Le Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (SEMARNAT) du Mexique a inscrit les Humedales de la Laguna La Cruz (6665 hectares, 28°47’15”N-111°52’53”O) sur la Liste de Ramsar. Il s’agit de la 139e zone humide d’importance internationale de ce pays.


Via Pescalune
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from Planets, Stars, rockets and Space
Scoop.it!

Scienzaltro - Astronomia, Cielo, Spazio: Per iniziare bene la settimana

Scienzaltro - Astronomia, Cielo, Spazio: Per iniziare bene la settimana | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it

Via Leopoldo Benacchio
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuliano Cipollari
Scoop.it!

Wildlife Habitat Council: Learning to Support Wildlife | Beyond the Rows

Wildlife Habitat Council: Learning to Support Wildlife | Beyond the Rows | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it
A Monsanto employee describers what she learned at a recent Wildlife Habitat Council meeting, and why wildlife protection is important to a manufacturing plant.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuliano Cipollari
Scoop.it!

Western black rhino declared extinct

Western black rhino declared extinct | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it
Africa's western black rhino is now officially extinct according the latest review of animals and plants by the world's largest conservation network.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from World Environment Nature News
Scoop.it!

Orangutans rescued as haven takes shape in the wilds of Sumatra

Orangutans rescued as haven takes shape in the wilds of Sumatra | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it
Australian-led project will allow orangutans to roam free on their own islands, featuring feeding platforms and puzzles

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from World Environment Nature News
Scoop.it!

IPCC report finds temperatures on track to rise by more than two degrees

IPCC report finds temperatures on track to rise by more than two degrees | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it
It is more certain than ever that human civilisation is the main cause of global warming, putting the world on track for dangerous temperature rises, the latest major UN assessment of climate change science has found.

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from Oceans and Wildlife
Scoop.it!

Genomes of big cats revealed

Genomes of big cats revealed | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it
International scientists have mapped the genomes of the tiger, lion and snow leopard, in conservation efforts to protect endangered species.

Via Wildlife Defence
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from World Environment Nature News
Scoop.it!

Species Science: Exploring Bug Biodiversity: Scientific American

Species Science: Exploring Bug Biodiversity: Scientific American | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it
An environment examination from Science Buddies (RT @BoraZ: Species Science: Exploring Bug Biodiversity http://t.co/V3bkNuXRyl)

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from Zones humides - Ramsar - Océans
Scoop.it!

Choyé, le castor s’épanouit à Genève

Choyé, le castor s’épanouit à Genève | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it

Une longue série de mesures permettent à la population de castors de se développer à Genève. 

Désormais, une cinquantaine de spécimens vivent dans le canton. Suite à leur réintroduction il y a une soixantaine d’années, ces gros rongeurs sont de mieux en mieux protégés. Un nouveau passage doit bientôt être construit près de Chancy-Pougny.


Via Pescalune
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from Nature to Share
Scoop.it!

En Louisiane, la mystérieuse maladie de la marée noire

En Louisiane, la mystérieuse maladie de la marée noire | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it

Le cabinet médical du docteur Robichaux est une petite bâtisse plate et sans charme postée au bord de la route. Derrière s'écoule paresseusement un bayou. C'est ici, à Raceland, à une soixantaine de kilomètres au sud-ouest de La Nouvelle-Orléans, que Michael Robichaux commence, à l'été 2010, à recevoir des patients présentant des symptômes qu'il assure n'avoir

 

"jamais vus en quarante ans de médecine".


Migraines, spasmes, éruptions cutanées, troubles respiratoires ou digestifs, douleurs diffuses et, surtout, confusion, perte de la mémoire de court terme et fatigue chronique. Et des atteintes liées au sexe : perturbation du cycle menstruel chez les femmes, impuissance chez les hommes. Pour le médecin, ancien sénateur de l'Etat de Louisiane, ces troubles seraient liés à l'épandage massif de Corexit – le solvant utilisé à grande échelle pour "nettoyer" la marée noire de BP dans le golfe du Mexique.

 

Trois ans après l'enrayement de la fuite du puits de Macondo, le 16 juillet 2010, le médecin dit avoir été consulté par "plus d'une centaine de patients" présentant ce tableau clinique, comparable, selon lui, au syndrome dont sont encore victimes plusieurs dizaines de milliers de vétérans de la première guerre (1990-1991) du Golfe, persique celui-là.

 

Désormais épaulé par deux ONG – le Government Accountability Project (GAP), basé à Washington, et le Louisiana Environmental Action Network (LEAN) –, Michael Robichaux suspecte un problème de santé publique silencieux le long des côtes du golfe du Mexique.

 

"PROBLÈMES DE MÉMOIRE"

 

"A l'été 2010, lorsque le nettoyage a débuté, nous avons commencé à lire dans la presse que des personnels recrutés par BP pour participer aux opérations tombaient malades, certains étant hospitalisés", raconte le médecin. Une association écologiste locale présente au médecin une quinzaine de patients, des pêcheurs enrôlés dans le nettoyage de la marée noire ou de simples riverains des côtes, lui demandant de pratiquer des prélèvements sanguins.

 

"Tous avaient des taux élevés de composés organiques volatils, dit-il. Tous présentaient des symptômes proches, en particulier des pertes de mémoire à court terme et une fatigue chronique."

 

Le praticien dit avoir vu quelque 119 malades. Pour combien, au total, dans l'ensemble de la région ? "Je l'ignore, mais plusieurs milliers est plausible", répond-il. Une évaluation d'autant plus délicate que "l'état de certains s'est amélioré, tandis que d'autres demeurent affectés, surtout par les problèmes de mémoire et de fatigue chronique".

 

L'exposition au Corexit est, selon le médecin, la principale cause de ces troubles : "Dans le golfe, nous avons l'habitude des fuites de pétrole, mais celui qui s'est écoulé en 2010 ] est peu toxique et jamais, avant l'utilisation du Corexit, de tels troubles n'avaient été relevés."

 

Au large des côtes de Louisiane, pendant plusieurs mois, le solvant a été utilisé à une échelle inédite. Selon les chiffres officiels des autorités fédérales américaines, plus de 7 000 mètres cubes du produit ont été utilisés, plus de la moitié épandus par avion. Or ce solvant est interdit dans plusieurs pays, dont le Royaume-Uni, patrie de BP.

 

Jamie Simon, 34 ans, une ancienne patiente de M. Robichaux, ne s'est jamais remise de la marée noire. "J'ai travaillé pour BP pendant sept mois sur un ''hôtel flottant'', à cuisiner pour les marins recrutés pour le nettoyage, raconte la jeune femme, qui vit désormais chez sa mère, à Thibodaux, à quelques kilomètres de Raceland. Lorsque les marins revenaient à bord, leurs bottes étaient pleines d'une boue liquide de pétrole et de dispersant...

 

Le manager disait que ce n'était pas plus dangereux que du liquide vaisselle." Au bout d'un mois, la jeune femme dit avoir ressenti de premiers troubles, qui sont allés en s'aggravant. Jusqu'à ce qu'ils l'obligent à quitter son emploi.

 

"BONNE À RESTER CHEZ MOI"

 

Les manifestations les plus aiguës ont disparu. "Mais je suis désormais incapable de travailler, dit-elle. J'ai perdu ma mémoire de court terme, ma concentration... Je jouais du piano et je n'y arrive plus. A 34 ans, je suis bonne à rester chez moi et à regarder le plafond."

 

Jorey Danos, 31 ans, également habitant de Thibodaux, a été l'un des quelque 50 000 travailleurs recrutés par BP pour travailler au nettoyage de la marée noire. Il dit avoir été, à plusieurs reprises, exposé à des doses importantes de Corexit et de pétrole.

 

Trois ans plus tard, il se déplace comme un vieillard et s'exprime avec difficulté : "J'ai le sentiment que mon cerveau a grillé. Je me perds dans mon jardin. Je ne sais plus conduire... Je ne peux même plus m'occuper de mes enfants." De plus, raconte-t-il, le responsable de BP dont il dépendait lui aurait refusé le port d'un masque à gaz au motif que cela "attirerait l'attention des médias".

 

Dans un rapport rendu public en avril, les deux ONG, le GAP et le LEAN, ont fait déposer sous serment une vingtaine de victimes et témoins des opérations de nettoyage. Outre la description de leurs symptômes, d'autres marins et travailleurs recrutés par BP assurent que leur chef d'équipe leur a refusé du matériel de protection, en dépit de leur difficulté à respirer.

 

D'autres témoignages, recueillis par l'hebdomadaire Newsweek et publiés au printemps, vont dans le même sens. Or, le fabricant du Corexit, dans sa notice d'utilisation, fait clairement état de la toxicité de son produit. Sur ce point précis, une enquête du médiateur de BP – qui n'a pas donné suite aux sollicitations du Monde – est en cours.

 

Combien de personnes, au total sont-elles concernées ? La réponse viendra peut-être d'une enquête épidémiologique menée par le National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences auprès de ceux qui ont travaillé au nettoyage.

 

"Près de 33 000 participants ont accepté de partager leur histoire avec nous et nous allons les suivre pendant dix ans pour déterminer si des effets sanitaires vont se manifester, explique l'épidémiologiste Richard Kwok, coresponsable de l'étude. Nous avons suivi les informations de presse sur des symptômes liés au pétrole et aux dispersants et avons intégré ces questions au protocole de notre étude."

 

Les résultats de ce travail sont attendus dans les prochains mois. Pour l'heure, aucune autorité ne reconnaît ces troubles ni leur lien éventuel avec la marée noire.


Via Damoclès
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from Zones humides - Ramsar - Océans
Scoop.it!

Une falaise s'effondre en Seine-Maritime

Une falaise s'effondre en Seine-Maritime | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it

Les côtes près du Havre sont sujettes à l'érosion, à tel point que ce lundi, tout un pan de falaise s'est effondré. 


Via Pescalune
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from Planets, Stars, rockets and Space
Scoop.it!

Scienzaltro - Astronomia, Cielo, Spazio: Il Piccolo Principe stregato dall'aurora.

Scienzaltro - Astronomia, Cielo, Spazio: Il Piccolo Principe stregato dall'aurora. | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it

Via Leopoldo Benacchio
more...
Leopoldo Benacchio's curator insight, July 13, 2013 9:55 AM

Il Piccolo Principe, sempre magico come le aurore 

Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from All about water, the oceans, environmental issues
Scoop.it!

SCUBA SCOOP/latest dive stories: 10 Facts About Sharks

SCUBA SCOOP/latest dive stories: 10 Facts About Sharks | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it

There are several hundred species of sharks, ranging in size from less than ten inches to over 50 feet. These amazing animals have a fierce reputation, but fascinating biology. Here we'll explore ten things that define sharks.


Via Kathy Dowsett
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuliano Cipollari from Oceans and Wildlife
Scoop.it!

Fin Whale | American Cetacean Society

Fin Whale | American Cetacean Society | Totalmente Natura | Scoop.it

The fin whale is one of the rorquals, a family that includes the humpback whale, blue whale, Bryde's whale, sei whale, and minke whale.


Via Wildlife Defence
more...
No comment yet.