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Learning Never Stops: 15 places with fun and engaging social studies games

Learning Never Stops: 15 places with fun and engaging social studies games | Totality | Scoop.it

Via Kathleen Cercone
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Guusje Moore's curator insight, January 15, 2014 11:13 PM

Social Studies games are hard to come by.  Includes a number of Bristish history games too.

KB...Konnected's curator insight, January 22, 2014 6:01 PM

Excellent collection of Social Studies games!

Rescooped by Virginia Lloyd from New Web 2.0 tools for education
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Brainy Approaches to Learning | Students at the Center


Via Kathleen Cercone
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Culture Secretary says 'the Arts' make our hearts sing! | THE ...

Culture Secretary says 'the Arts' make our hearts sing! | THE ... | Totality | Scoop.it
Thomas' poetry was some of the first poetry I read at school. ... But what is constant is the fact that these artists… their music, their paintings, their prose and their poetry… continue to move and inspire us.
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Rescooped by Virginia Lloyd from iPads in Education
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Teachers Use Tech: Create a Vocabulary Spinner with the Decide Now! app

Teachers Use Tech: Create a Vocabulary Spinner with the Decide Now! app | Totality | Scoop.it

"The app, Decide Now! has been a terrific addition to my Vocabulary instruction.  Any time I introduce a new word to our Academic Vocabulary list, students immediately add it to their "Vocabulary wheel" within this app!"


Via John Evans
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Hilary Munchel Thompson's curator insight, January 26, 2014 5:23 PM

I imagine this would be cool if your school had 1:1 iPad adoption.

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Stealthy Readers’ Advisory: Getting Boys to Read | NoveList | EBSCOhost

Stealthy Readers’ Advisory: Getting Boys to Read | NoveList | EBSCOhost | Totality | Scoop.it
We've all heard this, haven't we? Boys and books don’t go together. We heard it in library school, we might see it among our patrons, and maybe even experience it at home with the boys in our lives

Via Marita Thomson, Heather Stapleton
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Marita Thomson's curator insight, August 21, 2013 5:44 PM

Some outside the square ideas for what works with boys, but none of these ideas need be exclusive to them. I like the emphasis on relationship building for long term success. Settng up activities which don't start with books but can easily include them is an excellent soft sell option. Recognising that many kids want to do things rather than talk about them opens up interesting options.

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How to teach… reading for pleasure - The Guardian

How to teach… reading for pleasure - The Guardian | Totality | Scoop.it

"The link between reading for fun and educational success is well established, but how can teachers get reluctant readers into books?"


Via Heather Stapleton
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Heather Stapleton's curator insight, December 17, 2013 10:41 PM

Links to resources from the Teacher Network, The Guardian.

Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, December 18, 2013 2:05 AM

This is full of useful ideas and resources. 

Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, December 18, 2013 10:16 PM

An excellent resource for teachers as it focuses on reluctant readers and those from illiterate or non reading homes.

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What I Hate About Being a Reader

What I Hate About Being a Reader | Totality | Scoop.it
Most serious readers love that they are serious readers, and the compensations of a robust reading life are much discussed. But there are also aspects of reading that are undeniably frustrating. Here are mine, in no particular order.

Via Sharon Bakar
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Sharon Bakar's curator insight, January 23, 2014 3:25 AM

All this is so true! But the things I love about being a reader thankfully balance things out.

Rescooped by Virginia Lloyd from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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We're Teaching Books That Don't Stack Up

We're Teaching Books That Don't Stack Up | Totality | Scoop.it
All too often it's English teachers who close down teen interest in reading.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, January 24, 2014 3:36 PM

24 January 2014

 (This scooped article was orignally published in 2008)

 

Okay, Gulp!

 

I think I'll begin my comments with one of my favorite Dick Cavett quotes....

 

__________

It's a rare person who wants to hear what he doesn't want to hear.

__________

 

There, I said it. Literature teachers, we may just be a big part of the problem, well intended as we may be.

 

If you don't read the scooped article, or finish my brief comments, I'll include one paragragh from the article worthy of some open-minded collegial contemplation in a pending department meeting...

 

__________

""Butchering." That's what one of my former students, a young man who loves creative writing but rarely gets to do any at school, called English class. He was referring to the endless picking apart of linguistic details that loses teens in a haze of "So what?" The reading quizzes that turn, say, "Hamlet" into a Q&A on facts, symbols and themes. The thesis-driven essay assignments that require students to write about a novel they can't muster any passion for ("The Scarlet Letter" is high on teens' list of most dreaded). I'll never forget what one parent, bemoaning his daughter's aversion to great books after she took AP English Literature, wrote to me: "What I've seen teachers do is take living, breathing works of art and transform them into dessicated lab specimens fit for dissection."

__________

 

(awkward pause)

 

 

 

Yes, we do need to sow the seeds of the next crop of English majors. But, we ought to consider it even more important, since the numbers are so lopsided, to remember that as many as 90% of our students "ain't gonna major in English" and perhaps as many as 50% of our students "ain't gonna read a single piece of fiction" after they are no longer required to do so.

 

I know.

 

I don't particularly want to hear it either.  But "facts is facts." And, if there is any truth in the contentions made in this article that in too many cases we may be killing what we believe we are nourishing we may want to revisit even our own personal favorite lessons.

 

I am not proposing that we "dumb down" but rather that we give some thought to how we might "relevance up" what we do in our literary reading instruction. Anyone who can't imagine how to "relevance up" say a play like Cyrano deBergerac, must surely have forgotten what it felt like to have acne or the intensity of the forces of physical attractivenss at a time in one's life when "inner beauty" is just something that teens' parents say is really important while correcting their children's posture.

 

Yes, of course! That's it. Our students don't particularly want to hear what they don't want to hear either. But, we're the grown ups in the room aren't we? 

 

Of course if taken as a blanket condemnation of how we teach literary reading, then it is a harsh and unfair implication to suggest that none of us do manage to successfully engage the vast majority of our students. But, if we are willing to listen and hear what we may not really want to hear, we may give some readjusted attention to the complaints of those who are brave or annoyed enough to express those complaints. And, if we really do want to hear what we really don't want to hear, then we might also spend significant time listening to the eerie silience of those who "lay low" only pretending to care or to those silent ones who don't even bother to pretend to care while wondering why the clock moves so slowly.

 

We can sometimes too easily explain away the complaints and disengaged silence by believing that "they're just lazy, they spend too much time on facebook, they just don't care, that they just want less challenging work." There certainly are those. But a surprising number of the disengaged don't want less; they want "something" more.

 

It was not too long ago that the battle cry was, "No Child Left Behind!" But, I would propose that perhaps an equally important concern is that when we finish with them, that they do not ride off "into the real world" happy to be finally free to leave some of their teachers behind.

 

Teach to their hearts and their minds will follow.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

 

Shay Davidson's curator insight, January 24, 2014 8:47 PM

Interesting. I'm quite sure people could argue all day about the books kids are forced to read in high school. I only wish that good teachers had a choice in the books they wanted to present to students--and I'd get to pick the good teachers out!

Steffen Sipe's curator insight, January 30, 2014 3:45 AM

sorry....

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Collaboration Matters

Collaboration Matters | Totality | Scoop.it
Guest blogger Joshua Block, a high school humanities teacher, talks about the challenges of teaching collaboration as a skill and provides examples of how he has integrated it into his classroom practice.

Via Charles Fischer
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Charles Fischer's curator insight, January 23, 2014 7:18 AM

Collaboration is a set of skills that need to be practiced - just like any skills. Collaboration does matter a great deal, in fact. It is the norm now to have teams of people from around the world working together to make decisions, solve problems, generate new ideas, and so on. The future is collaborative. We need to teach our students the skills they will need in order to embrace that future.

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How Students Can Create Animated Movies to Teach Each Other

How Students Can Create Animated Movies to Teach Each Other | Totality | Scoop.it
In addition to learning our content and curriculum standards, today's students also need to be able to do the following effectively: collaborate with one another, synthesize ideas, create content, ...

Via Kathleen Cercone
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Betty Skeet's curator insight, January 21, 2014 7:11 AM

Learning, cooperating, creating...

Karine Thonnard's curator insight, January 21, 2014 8:58 AM

add your insight...

 

 
Lee Hall's curator insight, January 24, 2014 9:42 AM

These are very helpful in meeting Common Core standards.

 

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Google Tips And Tricks Every Student Should Know

Google Tips And Tricks Every Student Should Know | Totality | Scoop.it
Whether you’re a student or lifelong learner, Google is an essential tool for your education. Here are a few tips for using Google search and ot...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Six Ways Arts Education Helps Prepare our Kids for Life : LA Bitter ...

Six Ways Arts Education Helps Prepare our Kids for Life : LA Bitter ... | Totality | Scoop.it
It's a part of the ongoing ridiculousness of whether or not Arts Education belongs in our schools. The answer of course is yes. The same with Music Eduction and Physical Education, and yet we see these programs first on the ...
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Free Technology for Teachers: 7 Free iPad Apps for Science Lessons

Free Technology for Teachers: 7 Free iPad Apps for Science Lessons | Totality | Scoop.it

"I'm preparing to do a virtual presentation for a small district next month. My hosts asked for a list of some science apps that their middle school and high school students can use. This is part of the list that has free apps. "


Via John Evans
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Rescooped by Virginia Lloyd from Interesting Reading
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10 Reasons Why We Need at Least 8 Hugs a Day

10 Reasons Why We Need at Least 8 Hugs a Day | Totality | Scoop.it

Hugging therapy is definitely a powerful way of healing. Research shows that hugging (and also laughter) is extremely effective at healing sickness, disease, loneliness, depression, anxiety and stress.


Via Ivo Nový
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Beyond the Comfort Zone: 6 Ways to Build Independent Thinking

Beyond the Comfort Zone: 6 Ways to Build Independent Thinking | Totality | Scoop.it
Edutopia blogger Judy Willis offers six suggestions for pushing students beyond their comfort zone, exercising their brains' executive functions, and developing healthy habits of independent thinking.

Via Charles Fischer
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Charles Fischer's curator insight, January 11, 2014 11:31 AM

A great article to get students truly thinking, not just parroting what others say. Here's a quick summary:


"One way you can help your students shift from blindly following instructions and memorizing single right answers is to help them recognize their successful use of executive functions throughout their learning experiences."

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THE TRIAL BALLOON: Why graphic novels should be used in the classroom

THE TRIAL BALLOON: Why graphic novels should be used in the classroom | Totality | Scoop.it

THE TRIAL BALLOON: After a banner year for graphic novels, teachers should heed these titles for class.

 

Di Laycock's insight on the article:

"Cavna's opening story is very similar to the one that inspired my doctorate on the experiences of teachers with graphic novels (still a work in progress). It's a great article and certainly 'walks the talk' about the power of images (and or text). Just love those drawings! Check out the blog comments (all 120 of them) for an interesting discussion and for some great links to other graphic novel resources."


Via dilaycock, Heather Stapleton
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dilaycock's curator insight, January 5, 2014 5:57 PM

Cavna's opening story is very similar to the one that inspired my doctorate on the experiences of teachers with graphic novels (still a work in progress). It's a great article and certainly "walks the talk" about the power of images (and or text). Just love those drawings! Check out the blog comments (all 120 of them) for an interesting discussion and for some great links to other graphic novel resources.

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Enjoy A Book: Remedies for Reluctant Readers

Enjoy A Book: Remedies for Reluctant Readers | Totality | Scoop.it

"A book review blog with a literacy lean. Contemporary young adult, middle-grade, nonfiction, literary fiction--there's something here for everyone!"


Via Heather Stapleton
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Heather Stapleton's curator insight, January 16, 2014 9:21 PM

Great posts on promoting reading, literacy, book reviews, readers advisory and more!

Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, January 18, 2014 12:41 AM

I love reading yet I have grandchildren who don't enjoy it. And I know there are children and adults everywhere like that. So this blog might be of help. Also those wishing to improve their English and looking for books that will reward their effort.

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Teacher's Column On Education Reform Goes Viral - Courant.com

Teacher's Column On Education Reform Goes Viral - Courant.com | Totality | Scoop.it
When Elizabeth Natale wrote an opinion piece for the Courant last Sunday venting her frustrations with education reform, she didn't expect it to go viral, resulting in emails of support from teachers and parents across ...
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