Tornadoes
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Scientists on a mission: Detailed study of U.S. southeast tornadoes

Scientists on a mission: Detailed study of U.S. southeast tornadoes | Tornadoes | Scoop.it

It was one of the deadliest tornado outbreaks in U.S. history. Now scientists are organizing a research program to better understand the tornadoes that blew through Alabama and other southeastern states on April 27, 2011.


Via Paulo Furtado
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Rachel Strauss's comment, July 8, 2013 11:16 PM
This article it good for information on what is happening now on research to understand how tornadoes work.
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Making Sense of the Moore Tornado in a Climate Context | Climate Central

Making Sense of the Moore Tornado in a Climate Context | Climate Central | Tornadoes | Scoop.it
Trying to make sense of the Moore tornado, here are some of the things we know and don't know about tornadoes, and the role of climate change.

Via SustainOurEarth
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Rachel Strauss's comment, July 8, 2013 11:18 PM
This is a good resourse or research on Climate control and if this has anything to do with climate control.
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Tornadoes and Global Warming: Is There a Connection?

Tornadoes and Global Warming: Is There a Connection? | Tornadoes | Scoop.it
Global warming is causing more extreme weather. But when it comes to tornadoes, it could go either way.

Via Kathy Dowsett
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Celest Ybarra's curator insight, March 30, 2014 5:03 PM

Title: Tornadoes and Global Warming: Is There a Connection?

Author: Robert Kunzig

Main Idea: Global Warming could be a major factor to the development of larger storms

Summary:

1) Climate change is increasing the Earth's temperature and is decreasing our atmospheric energy

2) The change in climate has the ability to not only strengthen storms, but also make less tornadoes

3) Global Warming might also be the cause to suppressing gases, which cause more dangerous tornadoes to form

Opinion: No, it was based off of scientific theories by researchers and scientists

Question: Can Global Warming be linked to other hazardous weather occurrences?

Is this article important to science?: Yes, because it informs us that since Global Warming may be a key factor to the fact that we have more dangerous weather it can help us to reduce anything that causes Global Warming, like burning fossil fuels.

Source: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/05/130522-tornado-climate-change-oklahoma-science-global-warming/

Martha Resavy's curator insight, July 14, 2015 3:59 PM

This article takes a look at global warming and its potential influence on the frequency/strength of tornadoes.

Logan Willits's curator insight, July 19, 2015 9:34 PM

Article discussing global warming and the changes in weather patterns and how it will affect tornadoes and their severity/commonality.

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Tornado Tracks: 56 Years Of America’s Most Terrifying Tornadoes Visualized

Tornado Tracks: 56 Years Of America’s Most Terrifying Tornadoes Visualized | Tornadoes | Scoop.it

Tornadoes form under a certain set of weather conditions in which three very different types of air come together in a certain way. Near the ground lies a layer of warm and humid air, along with strong south winds. Colder air and strong west or southwest winds lie in the upper atmosphere. Temperature and moisture differences between the surface and the upper levels create what we call instability. A necessary ingredient for tornado formation. The change in wind speed and direction with height is known as wind shear. This wind shear is linked to the eventual development of rotation from which a tornado may form.

 

A third layer of hot dry air becomes established between the warm moist air at low levels and the cool dry air aloft. This hot layer acts as a cap and allows the warm air underneath to warm further...making the air even more unstable. Things start to happen when a storm system aloft moves east and begins to lift the various layers. Through this lifting process the cap is removed, thereby setting the stage for explosive thunderstorm development as strong updrafts develop. Complex interactions between the updraft and the surrounding winds may cause the updraft to begin rotating-and a tornado is born.

 

The Great Plains of the Central United States are uniquely suited to bring all of these ingredients together, and so have become known as "Tornado Alley." The main factors are the Rocky Mountains to the west, the Gulf of Mexico to the south, and a terrain that slopes downward from west to east.

 

During the spring and summer months southerly winds prevail across the plains. At the origin of those south winds lie the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico, which provide plenty of warm, humid air needed to fuel severe thunderstorm development. Hot dry air forms over the higher elevations to the west, and becomes the cap as it spreads eastward over the moist Gulf air. Where the dry air and the Gulf air meet near the ground, a boundary known as a dry line forms to the west of Oklahoma. A storm system moving out of the southern Rockies may push the dry line eastward, with severe thunderstorms and tornadoes forming along the dry line or in the moist air just ahead of it.

 

What is the Fujita Tornado Damage Scale? Dr. T. Theodore Fujita, a pioneer in the study of tornadoes and severe thunderstorm phenomena, developed the Fujita Tornado Damage Scale (F-Scale) to provide estimates of tornado strength based on damage surveys. Since it is extremely difficult to make direct measurements of tornado winds, an estimate of the winds based on damage is the best way to classify them. The new Enhanced Fujita Scale (EF-Scale) addresses some of the limitations identified by meteorologists and engineers since the introduction of the Fujita Scale in 1971. Variability in the quality of construction and different local building codes made classifying tornadoes in a uniform manner difficult. In many cases, these inconsistencies led to overestimates in the strength of tornadoes. The new scale identifies 28 different free standing structures most affected by tornadoes taking into account construction quality and maintenance. The range of tornado intensities remains as before, zero to five, with 'EF0' being the weakest, associated with very little damage and 'EF5' representing complete destruction, which was the case in Greensburg, Kansas on May 4th, 2007, the first tornado classified as 'EF5'. The EF scale was adopted on February 1, 2007.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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weather-wherever's curator insight, June 7, 2013 9:28 AM

Fascinating! 

Rachel Strauss's comment, July 8, 2013 11:54 PM
This article gives insight on some of the biggest tornadoes and the distruction that they left behind. I think that it is very intresting to see the different effects over the years.
Logan Willits's curator insight, July 19, 2015 10:17 PM

Link showing map and frequency of tornadoes across the United States for the last 50+ years.

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The 2011 Tornadoes and the Future of Tornado Research

Simmons, Kevin M., and Daniel Sutter. "The 2011 Tornadoes And The Future Of Tornado Research." Bulletin Of The American Meteorological Society 93.7 (2012): 959. Science Reference Center. Web.


Via amanda erb
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amanda erb's curator insight, June 18, 2013 4:20 PM

This article talks about tornadoes that happened in 2011 and the future of tornadoe research.  It talks about how to keep people safe from tornadoes.  It also talks about how scientist plan to study tornadoes more in the future to predict them better.

Rachel Strauss's comment, July 8, 2013 11:34 PM
Again another resoures to get more infor aobut how to keep pepole safe and what is happening to predict he storms paths.
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JSTOR: Demography, Vol. 30, No. 4 (Nov., 1993), pp. 623-633

Rachel Strauss's insight:

I feel that this article will give me insight on the research that has been going on about tornadoes. I give you information on what studies have been going on within the last 50years.

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Tornado Survival 101: Tips on How to Stay Safe During a Tornado - ABC News

WTVBTornado Survival 101: Tips on How to Stay Safe During a TornadoABC NewsBy LAUREN EFFRON (@LEffron831) A man carries a young girl who was rescued after being trapped with her mother in their home after a tornado hit Joplin, Mo.


Via Northlandfox
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Rachel Strauss's comment, July 8, 2013 11:47 PM
This article is more insight on how to stay safe during a tornadoe.
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Blind Eye In The Sky: Weather Satellites Lose Funding : NPR

Blind Eye In The Sky: Weather Satellites Lose Funding : NPR | Tornadoes | Scoop.it

Federal budget cuts are threatening to leave the U.S. without some critical weather satellites. That would mean less accurate warnings about events like blizzards and tornadoes.


Via Leopoldo Benacchio
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Rachel Strauss's comment, July 8, 2013 11:20 PM
I found this article interesting about where the federal funding is going when it comes to research. Not having the money to research to get out the up to date warnings seems scary to me.
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Surviving A Tornado

Surviving A Tornado | Tornadoes | Scoop.it

[NOTE: This article is adapted from When Disaster Strikes: A Comprehensive Guide for Emergency Planning and Crisis Survival]
Who could not be shocked and saddened by the images of massive devastation left in the wake of recent tornadoes that struck in Oklahoma and Texas? Though nothing can guarantee absolute safety in the path of a tornado, outside of a shelter with reinforced concrete and steel walls, understanding something about the nature of tornadoes, safety tips for surviving a tornado strike, and which common folklore is to be trusted or ignored, will improve your chances for making the right decision when confronted by a tornado.


Via SustainOurEarth
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Rachel Strauss's comment, July 8, 2013 11:22 PM
I think that this will give me insight if people really do know what to do in the event of a tornado. Is it that they don't have time or not listening to the warnings.
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Hurricanes, Tornadoes & Doppler Radars? Old news. | US-Ignite.org

Hurricanes, Tornadoes & Doppler Radars? Old news. | US-Ignite.org | Tornadoes | Scoop.it

 

Doppler radars are effective, but they’re outdated.

 

While we can detect storms with Doppler, storms are moving faster than those systems can help prepare citizens for. We need more detail on the storms and where they are moving — and we need that data quicker.  With storms as large as Hurricane Sandy, or with tornadoes that have hit downtown areas like Dallas in recent years and suburban Oklahoma City yesterday, we need real-time systems for detecting storms and figuring out exactly what areas they will impact.

 

Enter CASA: the Collaborative Sensing of the Atomosphere (CASA) program. It’s a long name, but it essentially means: predictive storm tracking that gives people in a city much more time to prepare by processing a lot more data more quickly.

 

As UMass Amherst explains, “Having detected a storm, they conduct ‘smart’ scans focused on areas of greatest concern to give a precise location,” providing “data 5  to 10 times more detailed than current radar systems.”

 

But we can’t use these great devices with our current Internet – we need advanced networks with gigabit speeds, software definition, and local cloud capabilities. Next generation applications like those that CASA is developing are especially exciting for us, as they provide tremendous societal benefit, and make the case for why we need to get advanced networks up and running around the country.

 

The latest on the CASA system being installed in Dallas, and in the heart of Tornado Alley, Oklahoma, is below:

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Rachel Strauss's comment, July 8, 2013 11:31 PM
This article is telling me about the latest tecnologies that are being installed and if they are going to be better for warnings or is the tecnnology to soon for its time.
Logan Willits's curator insight, July 19, 2015 9:13 PM

Article about the need for significant research to create a better detecting tools for severe storms like tornadoes.

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Riders on the Storm

Bluestein, Howard B. "Riders On The Storm." Sciences 35.2 (1995): 26. Academic Search Complete. Web.


Via amanda erb
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amanda erb's curator insight, July 4, 2013 2:29 PM

In this article they talk about finding the birthplace of the tornado.  They give a lot of information about some of the first storm chasers and information on tornado from the past.  They also talk about radar used in the past for tornadoes.

Rachel Strauss's comment, July 8, 2013 11:32 PM
I thought this article was interesting to get an idea of where the weather tracking of a tornadoe began.
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JSTOR: Science, Vol. 15, No. 378 (May 2, 1890), pp. 269-272

JSTOR: Science, Vol. 15, No. 378 (May 2, 1890), pp. 269-272 | Tornadoes | Scoop.it
Rachel Strauss's insight:

I will be able to get facts aobut tornadoes and what can be concluded by what we know and what we need to know.

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The day that should change tornado actions and storm chasing forever

The day that should change tornado actions and storm chasing forever | Tornadoes | Scoop.it
Vehicle deaths in Friday's Oklahoma tornadoes should squash the idea that trying to flee a tornado in a car is a good idea. And storm chasers - who pursued the storms much too closely need to re-examine their priorities.

Via M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
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Rachel Strauss's comment, July 8, 2013 11:49 PM
This article is about storm chasers and how they risk there lives to get the data and information we need to know to be more aware of how dangours.