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Rescooped by João Greno Brogueira from sustainable architecture
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Green Innovation: First Bio-building Powered by Algae Opens in Hamburg

Green Innovation: First Bio-building Powered by Algae Opens in Hamburg | Top CAD Experts updates | Scoop.it

The world's first algae-powered building is being piloted in Hamburg.

Designed by multinational firm Arup, features panel glass bioreactors on a facade containing microalgae that generate biomass and heat, serving as a renewable energy source.


The systems provide insulation for the building- 129 bioreactors have been fitted to the southwest and southeast faces of the building. They are controlled by an energy management center in which solar thermal heat and algae are harvested and stored to be used to create hot water.

 

Jan Wurm, Arup’s Europe Research Leader, said: 'Using bio-chemical processes in the facade of a building to create shade and energy is a really innovative concept. 

'It might well become a sustainable solution for energy production in urban areas, so it is great to see it being tested in a real-life scenario.'


The news comes after Arup announced their vision for the future of skyscrapers which suggested that buildings would be 'living' buildings powered by algae that respond automatically to the weather and the changing needs of inhabitants...


Via Lauren Moss
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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, April 11, 2013 7:05 PM

I am interested to follow this story and to learn more details about the specific sources for the algae and a bit more of the science behind it.

ParadigmGallery's comment, April 11, 2013 10:59 PM
Thanks so much for your thoughts.....
Noor Fatima's comment, April 12, 2013 11:32 AM
welcome:)
Rescooped by João Greno Brogueira from sustainable architecture
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Pittsburgh's "breathing" building by Gensler aims to be the world's greenest skyscraper

Pittsburgh's "breathing" building by Gensler aims to be the world's greenest skyscraper | Top CAD Experts updates | Scoop.it

The PNC Financial Services Group hopes to exceed LEED Platinum requirements while promoting a healthy workplace with a recent development – the Tower at PNC Plaza. Located in downtown Pittsburgh, the building will be 800,00 sq.ft (74,322 sq.mt) with a construction budget of approximately US $240 million.


The "breathing" design created by architecture firm Gensler moves away from the traditional closed air-conditioned environment and has the lofty aim of becoming the greenest skyscraper in the world.


Employees in the 33 floor glass tower will access daylight and fresh air. The PNC Tower design recognizes that the Pittsburgh climate can provide increased levels of natural light onto the floorspace along with improved regulation of temperatures for much of the year without using traditional, energy-intensive HVAC systems. The Tower hopes to achieve this with a double-skin facade of two panes of glass separated by an enclosed cavity, allowing external air inside. The facade features operable doors and windows that admit fresh air into the building during optimal conditions, while a solar chimney is another passive system- it pulls air in through the open windows, the air then travels across the floors, is heated and exhaled through the roof shaft.


The Tower will consume less than 50 percent of the energy a typical office building uses and will save PNC at least 30 percent on its energy costs...


Via Lauren Moss
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Norm Miller's curator insight, January 9, 2013 12:07 PM

Tall buildings have been historically less efficient than smaller squarer buildings to operate, but now with new technologies we are seeing rapid improvements in the taller buildings and FINALLY we are seeing things like operable ventilation once again.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, February 1, 2013 9:25 AM

SCUP–49, the Society for College and University Planning's 49th annual conference, will be held in Pittsburgh in July 2014.

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Solar Carve Tower at the High Line | Studio Gang Architects

Solar Carve Tower at the High Line | Studio Gang Architects | Top CAD Experts updates | Scoop.it

Chicago-based architect, Jeanne Gang, just unveiled the latest project planned to border New York City’s beloved High Line. The 180,000 square-foot office tower with ground level retail will replace an existing, disused meatpacking plant along 10th Avenue between 13th and 14th streets. It will feature a glass facade that is intelligently shaped to avoid the disruption of light, air and views from the High Line.

The gem-like façade displays the exciting architectural potential of expanded notions of solar-driven zoning—and a skyscraper that enhances the public life of the city in ways that a stand-alone icon cannot. 

Dubbed the Solar Carve Tower, the mid-rise structure is currently pending city approval and is planned for completion in 2015.


Via Lauren Moss
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Stacking Green: A Green Facade House

Stacking Green: A Green Facade House | Top CAD Experts updates | Scoop.it

This house, designed for a thirty-year-old couple and their mother, is a typical tube house constructed on the plot 4m wide and 20m deep. The front and back façades are entirely composed of layers of concrete planters cantilevered from two side walls.


The height of the planters are adjusted according to the height of the plants, which varies from 25 cm to 40 cm. To water plants and for easy maintenance, automatic irrigation pipes inside the planters are used. Named “Stacking Green”, this tropical and unique house has façades filled with vital greenery.


The structure is a frame widely used in Vietnam. There are few partition walls in order to keep the view of green façades from every point of the house. During the day, the light varies- in the morning and afternoon, sunlight enters through on both façades, creating beautiful shadow effects on the stone walls. 


The green façade and roof top garden offer protection from direct sunlight, street noise and pollution. Natural ventilation also allows the house to save a energy in the harsh climate of Saigon. With an ecological approach, the design references the bioclimatic principles of a traditional Vietnamese courtyard house...


Via Lauren Moss
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Diana Rivera's curator insight, February 25, 2013 10:50 PM

This is a great way to interpret house plants into you home without taking up esential space in your home.  This also implements simple beautification and beautiful greens to bring good energy to the home.  With this unique building design friends and family will be shocked and overwhelmed with the beautiful lighting the plants shading will bring into the home.

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Twisting towers in Miami, Florida by Bjarke Ingels (BIG)

Twisting towers in Miami, Florida by Bjarke Ingels (BIG) | Top CAD Experts updates | Scoop.it

BIG, Raymond Jungles, Nichols Brosch Wurst Wolfe & Associates, Esrawe, Desimone + HNGS, transform the Coconut Grove Waterfront with twisting towers in Miami Florida, USA.


Developed by Terra Group, the Grove at Grand Bay residences, at the former site of the Grand Bay Hotel and minutes from downtown Miami, seeks to breath new life into Coconut Grove. With construction scheduled to begin the fourth quarter of 2012 and completion at the end of 2014, the project seeks LEED Silver Certification, the first of its kind in Coconut Grove.

Rising 20 stories, the towers will showcase 96 residences with panoramic views from every angle as they readjust their orientation to capture the full breadth of panoramic views from sailboat bays and the marina to the Miami skyline. The interactive movement of the two towers creates a new dancing silhouette on the Grove’s skyline.


Whether in the shade of the buildings’ twisting facades or inside, residents will fully experience and relish living amid the open air. The gardens and architecture will fuse seamlessly at the amenity levels, maximizing indoor outdoor living experiences unique to the South Florida climate. Views down into the gardens, towards the surrounding canopied neighborhoods, and beyond Sailboat Bay will offer peaceful, verdant backdrops to elegant residential interiors and vast balconies...


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by João Greno Brogueira from The Architecture of the City
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CO2ngress Towers: Reducing air pollution in Chicago + increasing public awareness

CO2ngress Towers:  Reducing air pollution in Chicago + increasing public awareness | Top CAD Experts updates | Scoop.it

“Every day, 77,000 carbon-emitting vehicles fly past the Congress Parkway interchange, polluting the air. This project creates a gateway over the corridor that filters air and fuels a new breed of car for its residents.”

Aimed to increase public awareness and improve public health, the CO2ngress Gateway Towers absorb the CO2 emissions from passing cars, which is fed to algae grown in the building. The algae then helps with the processing of biofuels which supply the building residents’ eco-friendly cars.

The two towers split and converge at the top to create an iconic gateway to the city. A bridge joins the two towers and contains a public restaurant with views of neighboring buildings. Pedestrian connections are landscaped at the base, giving a human scale to a car-centric urban identity.

Additionally, the double-skin facade helps reduce traffic noise and offers enclosed balconies. Natural cross-ventilation of the units is enabled through the building’s atrium. The terraces are enclosed by bio-reactor tubes which grow the algae responsible for biofuel processing...


Via Lauren Moss, association concert urbain
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Avneel Channan's curator insight, March 27, 2015 8:27 AM

This is a very innovative way of clearing C02 from the air. This is only the beginning of what this technology can bring to renewable energy and can really become evolutionary not to far from the future.  

Zohair Ahmed's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:57 PM

These two buildings reduce air pollution in Chicago by absorbing CO2 from cars and feeding it to algae grown inside the building.


This architectual concept is very amazing, for it may influence many other buildings to do a similar process of removing pollution. Pollution from transportation is affiliated with Unit 7 as an Urban environmental issue.

Clayton Nelson's curator insight, December 3, 2015 10:06 AM

This is a great and awesome idea! Not only do they help the environment their appearance is also awesome. Now someone should convince all other large cities to build these.  CN