Top CAD Experts updates
47.6K views | +0 today
Follow
Top CAD Experts updates
All about CAD, CAE, CAM, BIM, AEC, GIS, PLM and Project Managment...
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by João Greno Brogueira from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Wooden Skyscrapers: A New Level of Sustainability?

Wooden Skyscrapers: A New Level of Sustainability? | Top CAD Experts updates | Scoop.it

A new breed of high-rise architecture is in the process of being born, thanks to the collaborative efforts of modern design pioneers. Envisioned as the best sustainable option for meeting world housing demands and decreasing global carbon emissions, wooden mega-structures are now one step closer to becoming a reality.


“Big Wood,” a conceptual project to the eVolo 2013 Skyscraper Competition, builds on the premise that wood, when harvested responsibly, is one of the best tools architects and engineers have for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and creating healthy communities. Aspiring to become one of the greenest skyscrapers in the world, Big Wood challenges the way we build our cities and promotes timber as a reliable platform to support tomorrow’s office and residential towers...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
ParadigmGallery's curator insight, April 20, 2013 11:38 AM

The Case For Tall Wood                               Michael Green Architecture

I find this hard to truly picture, but the story is solid...."the last century there has been no reason to challenge steel and concrete as the essential structural materials of large buildings. Climate change now demands that we do.....Wood is the most significant building material we use today that is grown by the sun. When harvested responsibly, wood is arguably one of the best tools architects and engineers have for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and storing carbon in our buildings."

 

“I’d put my money on solar energy…I hope we don’t have to wait till oil and coal run out before we tackle that.”
~Thomas Edison, In conversation with Henry Ford and Harvey Firestone March 1931

 

http://mg-architecture.ca/portfolio/tallwood/

 

 

“Known as the birthplace of the skyscraper, Chicago is an optimal location for a prototype in mass timber construction,” writes Carlos Arzate

Geovanni's curator insight, May 8, 2013 9:32 AM

Fascinating place. Must of been a lot of wood to be created.

Bubba Muntzer's comment, May 13, 2013 11:44 AM
It takes around 30 years for a seedling to grow into the kind of wood that can be used in construction. A little maintenance is required during that period. Meanwhile it's soaking up CO2 and making oxygen. The only industrial processes required are to cut it down and cut it into boards and 2 x 4s. If you stagger your planting you have an endless supply.
Rescooped by João Greno Brogueira from Science News
Scoop.it!

The Third Industrial Revolution

The Third Industrial Revolution | Top CAD Experts updates | Scoop.it

From the year 2000 to 2010 the number of manufacturing jobs in America fell by about a third. The rise of outsourcing and offshoring and the growth of sophisticated supply chains has enabled companies the world over to use China, India and other lower-wage countries as workshops. Now, the global financial crisis has people thinking it is time their countries returned to making stuff in order to create jobs and prevent more manufacturing skills from being lost. These factors, and technologies like robotics, 3D printing and artificial intelligence could help bring about a Third Industrial Revolution.


Via Szabolcs Kósa, Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by João Greno Brogueira from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Sustainable Stereoscopic Weekend House

Sustainable Stereoscopic Weekend House | Top CAD Experts updates | Scoop.it

Designing a residence that encompasses daily activities and dreams in a studied floor plan can be quite challenging. Singapore-based architectural practice Pencil Office had even more things to consider when building the Stereoscopic House – like sustainability, solutions for constructing a resort-style residence or the interesting twist they eventually chose for this house. The detached weekend house is located on Singapore’s beautiful resort island of Sentosa, creating the perfect setting for an artistic interpretation of a modern retreat. Three sisters commissioned the architects to design a house that would merge eco-friendly features (low-E glazing, solar hot-water heating, cross ventilation, rain harvesting systems) with a modern design ensuring a fascinating set of views across the ocean.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by João Greno Brogueira from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

The Rock House in Norway Adjusts to the Terrain...

The Rock House in Norway Adjusts to the Terrain... | Top CAD Experts updates | Scoop.it

The Rock House replaces an older building at the site and had to be well adjusted to the terrain, both in terms of shape, scale, material and color. The house and terraces are partly built upon existing stone walls, the parts of the walls which are new are made of stones from the blasting at the site. The low elongated volume is cut into to allow for wind shielded outdoor areas, embraced by the house itself. These cuts also bring down the scale of the building, and together with the local variations of the section, make the building relate to the surrounding cliff formations.

On the outer perimeter of terraces and pool, a glass fence also protects against wind, but allows for maximum view. The house is clad with Kebony wood, a sustainable process of treating the wood to allow for good durability towards the exposure to salt water...

 

View the link for more great images of the Rock House...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by João Greno Brogueira from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Bach on Sleds: a sustainable New Zealand retreat

Bach on Sleds: a sustainable New Zealand retreat | Top CAD Experts updates | Scoop.it
On the shore of an idyllic white sandy beach on New Zealand's Coromandel Peninsula rests an elegant hut. The site lies within the coastal erosion zone, where all building must be removable. This is taken literally and the hut is designed on two thick wooden sleds for movement back up the site or across the beach and onto a barge.

The hut is a series of simple design moves. The aesthetic is natural and reminiscent of a beach artifact/perhaps a surf-life-saving or observation tower.

The two storey shutter on the front facade winches open to form an awning, shading the interior from summer sun while allowing winter sun to enter.

The hut is totally sustainable from its modest size to the use of timber in its cladding, structure, lining and joinery and from its worm tank waste system to the separate potable grey water tanks.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.