Tom's A Midsummer Night's Dream
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Bloom on A Midsummer Night's Dream

Bloom on A Midsummer Night's Dream | Tom's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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Literary Criticism:

 

This is a very interesting article that breaks down who Bottom and Puck are and what role they play in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. It starts by compairing the two characters by saying that everyone reduces to a Puck or Bottom. Bloom says that Puck is charming while Bottom is amiable or friendly and pleasant. He leaves the thought of puc for a while and says that even though Bottom changes on the outside he remains that same person on the inside. This article also touches upon the fact that Bottom refrences the Bible like my surce article did. Then he movs onto Puck only to tell us that if Oberon was not there that the four lovers would go on in their misadventure forever and Bottom would never resume his human shape. These two character play key roles and without them the play would not be the same.

 

Bloom, Harold. "Infobase Learning - Login." Infobase Learning - Login. Chelsea House Publishing, n.d. Web. 02 Apr. 2013.

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Bottom and Fairy Queen

Bottom and Fairy Queen | Tom's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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There are so many characters in A Midsummer Night's Dream that is can get hard to follow. This image of all the main characters shows who they are and what their relationship with the other characters in the play. This can be very useful if it becomes hard to follow who is who. By finding someone’s name it makes it very simple to figure out their identity. The confusing love triangles of A Midsummer Night's Dream can all simply be found in this small diagram.

 

"A Midsummer Night's Dream - Character Map." A Midsummer Night's Dream - Character Map. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Apr. 2013.

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Bottom's Greek Audience: 1 CORINTHIANS 1.21-25 and Shakespeare's A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM.

Bottom's Greek Audience: 1 CORINTHIANS 1.21-25 and Shakespeare's A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM. | Tom's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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Source:

 

There are many different sources that Shakespeare picks little things from to put in his plays. He takes identities, ideas and even quotes. In this article it is explained by Doloff and Steven J. that when bottom wakes up from his slumber after the antidote it placed in his eyes that he references the bible.

He says:

The eye of

man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen,

man’s hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceive,

nor his heart to report, what my dream was. I

will get Peter Quince to write a ballad of this

dream: it shall be called ‘Bottom’s Dream’, because

it hath no bottom; and I will sing it in the latter end

of a play, before the Duke

 

The bible says:

The things which

eye hathe not sene, nether eare hath heard,

nether came into mas heart, are, which

God hathe prepared for them that love

him.

But God hathe reveiled them unto us by

his Spirit: for the Spirit searcheth all

things, yea, the deepe things of God.

 

When Bottom says this he is referencing a passage from the New Testament’s 1 Corinthians 2.9–10. This has caught the eye of many people and made them wonder why it was placed there. The article says,

"This connection is not to the elusive metaphysical

meaning of the weaver’s “dream,” but rather to the particular, intended

recipients of Bottom’s memorialized supernatural experience, the Greek Duke Theseus of Athens and his Greek court."

 

This means that it is placed there because of his experience of being an ass. Out of all the sources Shakespeare uses these shows how religious he must be to be able to reference the First Testament.

 

 

 

Doloff, Steven J. "Bottom's Greek Audience: 1 CORINTHIANS 1.21-25 And Shakespeare's A MIDSUMMER NIGHT's DREAM." Explicator 65.4 (2007): 200-201. Academic Search Elite. Web. 23 Mar. 2013.

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Around The Beatles on UK TV April 1964

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In this video The Beatles perform their spoof of Pyramus and Thisbe found in A Midsummer Night's Dream. Though the remake of "a play inside a play" is funny and not taken very seriously it is very similar to the way it is preformed in A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The play starts with the wall approaching the center of the stage and reading the prologue which contains the names and roles of all the character and a brief summary of the actual play. The play continues on by the Beatles forgetting lines and goofing off as it is done in A Midsummer Night's Dream. Many times in the video the groundlings are very active in the play by commenting, laughing and cheering the play on or even booing when they do not like what happens. The Beatles remarkably pull off the play just as it is done in the play and do it with style.

 

"Around The Beatles" The Beatles preform a Shakespearean spoof of the Interlude section of "A Midsummer Night's Dream." on UK TV in April 1964.
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This One Is for the Groundlings.

This One Is for the Groundlings. | Tom's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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Historical Ariticle:

 

Having trouble understanding Shakespeare? Need help? In this article This One is for the Groundlings. it is explaned by Cameron Hunt McNabb that the message Shakespeare had can still be related to people today. McNabb is a college professor whos goal was to send teaching techniques to other teachers; telling them different ways to make modern connections. Even though the article does not specificly refrence A Midsemmer Night's Dream it can be very useful when interperiting other works of Shakespeare.

 

McNabb, Cameron Hunt. "This One Is For The Groundlings." Pedagogy 11.2 (2011): 404-408. Academic Search Elite. Web. 23 Mar. 2013.

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Luis Colon's comment, April 1, 2013 6:01 PM
Tom, I like how you address your audience directly and how you keep things organized.