I Shared Today with Friends and Family [CUES1]
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Introduction to this Scoop-it Site

Introduction to this Scoop-it Site | I Shared Today with Friends and Family [CUES1] | Scoop.it

"CUES1: Communicates some common characteristics that all people share, as well as some of the differences - Events shared with class members and with families"

Jessica Taylor's insight:

This blog post was written by myself as an introduction to this Scoop-it site I curate. Please read this blog to understand my purposes and intentions in curating this site. Thank you.

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Environmental Awareness Events Coolaustralia.org - Toolbox

Environmental Awareness Events Coolaustralia.org - Toolbox | I Shared Today with Friends and Family [CUES1] | Scoop.it
You will find video clips, documentaries, images, articles, stories and news for each major topic. These are all designed to entertain and inform at every turn. The toolbox is divided into Primary and Secondary levels and is brilliant for projects, research and further learning. If you have any cool information for us to include please …
Jessica Taylor's insight:

 

Context of Learning:

Our society is becoming increasingly aware of the need to care for, protect and restore the environment. Organisations and governments have attempted to increase awareness and to promote action through the creation of a range of special days and events. Events commonly observed in the Blue Mountains include Earth Hour, Clean Up Australia Day, Schools Trees Day and World Environment Day. In order for students to meaningfully share in these national and international events with their families and communities, students need to develop an understanding of the meaning behind these events and why caring for the environment is so important. Additionally, a key component of the HSIE syllabus requires the incorporation of global perspectives (BOS, 2006, p. 9). Global education encompasses five learning emphases, one of which is referred to as “Sustainable Futures” which involves “…an understanding of the ways in which we can meet our current needs without diminishing the quality of the environment or reducing the capacity of future generations to meet their own needs.” (Global Education, 2011, p. 5). This global perspective can be explored through students examining the environmental awareness events they and their families share.

 

What is the Resource?

Coolaustralia.org is an organisation passionate about “educating for a sustainable future”. (Cool Australia, n.d.). The website provides a wealth of resources and information both for teachers and students. The section of the website selected is called the “toolbox” and contains a range of “…video clips, documentaries, images, articles, stories and news…” (Cool Australia, n.d.) about current environmental issues and events. The resources displayed can be filtered into various year levels with the “Foundation” age being most suitable for Early Stage One students.

 

Use in the Classroom:

Following an initial class discussion where students examine the purpose of environmental awareness days, students can use this resource in independent or small group work. A classroom learning station where there is access to computers or i-pads can be set-up to enable students to explore a chosen topic using the website. Pedagogical research supports the use of work stations as they allow students to make choices, involve collaborative and hands-on learning, and enhance student engagement (Bottini & Grossman, 2006, p. 274). Student learning could be scaffolded through a series of task cards which require students to find out certain information about the environmental awareness days and how they and their families can best be involved in these events.

 

References:

Board of Studies New South Wales. (2006). Human society and its environment K-6 syllabus.­ Sydney: Author.

 

Bottini, M., & Grossman, S. (2005). Centre-based teaching and children’s learning: The effects of learning centres on young children’s growth and development. Childhood education, 81, 274-277.

 

Cool Australia. (n.d.). Toolbox. Retrieved March 31, 2014, from: http://coolaustralia.org/student-toolbox/

 

Global Education. (2011). Global perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools. Victoria: Education Services Australia.

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Muggadah Tours, Blue Mountains, NSW Australia - Blue Mountains Crossings Bicentenary

Muggadah Tours, Blue Mountains, NSW Australia - Blue Mountains Crossings Bicentenary | I Shared Today with Friends and Family [CUES1] | Scoop.it

"Our principal guides are Gundungurra descendents and cousins Trevor Brown and Kathleen Brown. The Gundungurra are Traditional Owners of the local area. We showcase Gundungurra culture and heritage through forms of cultural interpretation such as song, dance and art. Our traditional lands include the World Heritage Blue Mountains National Park. 


Our traditional knowledge coupled with an understanding of contemporary Aboriginal issues places us in a unique position to provide the ultimate cultural experience."

Jessica Taylor's insight:

 

Context of Learning:

2013 to 2015 marks the bicentenary of the first European crossing of the Blue Mountains which has been celebrated through a range of events across the region. A key focus of the bicentenary event is a festival of walking, encouraging people to participate in different bush and cultural walks. When exploring this event it is important to consider both the European perspective as well as the perspective of local Aboriginal peoples for whom the Blue Mountains is their traditional country which they had crossed innumerable times before any Europeans.

 

Aboriginal Perspectives:

The NSW HSIE syllabus requires teachers to incorporate Aboriginal perspectives in all learning (BOS, 2006, p. 9). One approach to including Indigenous perspectives is to “…make Aboriginal Australia an ongoing reference point for the students.” (Harrison, 2011, p. 178). This means, in the context of the CUES1 cultures outcome (BOS, 2006, p. 42), that teachers provide opportunities to approach the events explored from the perspectives of Aboriginal Australians. When exploring Aboriginal perspectives teachers must carefully evaluate resources to ensure they are appropriate. The Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide provides a fantastic selection criteria for evaluating resources (DET, 2003, pp. 15-17). A sound teaching practice when incorporating Indigenous perspectives involves teachers consulting local Aboriginal community members about resources and content, and inviting Aboriginal community members to share with students about Aboriginal perspectives either in the classroom or on an excursion.


Use in the Classroom:

In order to successfully introduce students to the Aboriginal perspective on the Crossing Bicentenary, an interactive and engaging excursion to places and pathways of cultural significance to Aboriginal peoples in the Blue Mountains, led by a local Aboriginal organisation, is an authentic teaching and learning strategy. As recent research noted, student learning can be enriched through excursion experiences (Greene, Kisida & Bowen, 2014, p. 86).

 

What is the Resource?

This is the website of the Muggadah Indigenous Tours group who provide tours and cultural experiences in the Blue Mountains and have been offering tours in celebration of the Crossings Bicentenary. Muggadah Tours is owned and operated by local Aboriginal people who are descendants of the Gundungarrah Aboriginal language group who are Traditional Owners of the area. By selecting an organisation that is run by local Aboriginal people who are connected to the land, teachers ensure students will receive information that is authentic, accurate, non-racist or stereotypical, and specially localised to the Aboriginal peoples, cultures and traditions of the Blue Mountains.

 

References:

Baddog Productions. (n.d.). Muggadah Indigenous Tours. Retrieved April 6, 2014 from: http://www.muggadahtours.com.au/index.html

 

Board of Studies New South Wales. (2006). Human society and its environment K-6 syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

Greene, J., Kisida, B., & Bowen, D. (2014). The educational value of field trips. Education Next, 14, 78-86.

 

Harrison, N. (2011). Teaching and learning in Aboriginal education. Victoria: Oxford University Press.

 

NSW Department of Education and Training, Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate. (2003). Aboriginal education K-12 resource guide. Sydney: Author.

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A is for ANZACs

A is for ANZACs | I Shared Today with Friends and Family [CUES1] | Scoop.it

"The publication is intended for use by students as an introduction to some of the traditions and terminology associated with Australia's recognition of ANZAC Day as an important national holiday."

Jessica Taylor's insight:

 

Context of Learning:

ANZAC Day is an event observed each year on the 25th of April where commemoration services are held across Australia to remember the men and women who have fought and died for our country. In the Blue Mountains, school children participate in community ANZAC Day commemoration services and in school remembrance assemblies. With this context in mind, it is crucial that children develop an understanding of why they and their families observe ANZAC Day.

 

What is the Resource?

The ANZAC Day Commemoration Committee (2009) have created an excellent website with a wealth of information and resources about the ANZAC legacy. One section of this site is an interactive page titled “A is for ANZACs” which is useful for sensitively introducing Kindergarten students to the meaning, significance and traditions associated with ANZAC Day commemorations. For each letter of the alphabet a different aspect of ANZAC tradition and history, such as poppies, memorials and medals, is examined through a short text and image. There are also additional links for teachers to follow for more detailed information.


Classroom Use:

This resource could be used in the lead up to ANZAC Day by exploring a different aspect of the ANZAC tradition each day. Students should participate in a local ANZAC Day service, where they witness key aspects of an ANZAC Day event. Students should take a photograph of different things their friends and family do on this day, such as rising early for a dawn service or wearing medals. Through this activity students begin connecting the ideas explored in the classroom through this resource, to their own real world experiences in observing this event. This reflects one aspect of what researches Newmann and Wehlage call “authentic pedagogy” where “…students use personal experiences as a context for applying knowledge.” (1993, p. 10).

 

To further student understanding of this shared event, students should present one of their photographs to the class explaining when and where they noticed this aspect of ANZAC Day and what is significant about this feature. Some scaffolding by the teacher will be necessary to encourage students to explain in detail about their experiences. This could be achieved through explicit instruction in how to present and the development of a series of questions students must address when delivering their presentation. This presentation incorporates literacy learning outcome ENe-1A as students communicate with peers in a guided activity (BOS, 2013, p. 31). The short presentations could be used as a formal assessment opportunity for teachers to determine student development in understanding about ANZAC Day.


References:

ANZAC Day Commemoration Committee of Queensland. (2009). A is for ANZACs. Retrieved March 30, 2014, from: http://www.anzacday.org.au/education/afor/afor-00.html

 

Board of Studies New South Wales. (2013). NSW syllabus for the Australian curriculum: English K-10 syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

Newman, F. & Wehlage, G. (1993). Five standards of authentic instruction. Educational Leadership, 50, 8-12.

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Christmas Around the World, Christmas Traditions and Celebrations in Different Countries and Cultures

Christmas Around the World, Christmas Traditions and Celebrations in Different Countries and Cultures | I Shared Today with Friends and Family [CUES1] | Scoop.it
How Christmas is celebrated Around the World in lots of different countries.
Jessica Taylor's insight:

 

Context of Learning:

Christmas is an event celebrated by people all over the world. However, different cultures and families celebrate this event in varied ways. Student understanding of this event can be expanded through an exploration of the similarities and differences in how they and others celebrate Christmas.

 

What is the Resource?

This resource is a website devoted to the celebration of Christmas. One section of the site provides links to an extensive list of countries with information about how Christmas is celebrated by people in that country.

 

Classroom Use:

The exploration of the Christmas event provides a valuable opportunity to introduce students to the process of inquiry learning. Inquiry learning has been described by researches Newmann and Wehlage (1993) as an example of authentic learning as it involves higher-order thinking, promotes deep learning, connects to the world outside the classroom, involves meaningful dialogue, and supports student achievement (pp. 8-12). The inquiry learning process involves three key stages including establishing what students need to find out, investigating, and presenting findings (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, pp. 108-117). This process will need to be simple and strongly scaffolded in the Kindergarten classroom.


A whole class brainstorm and the use of a KWL chart could be used to establish what students need to find out about how Christmas is observed by their class mates and families. The website resource could be used by teachers to help scaffold student understanding of what it means to celebrate Christmas in different and similar ways. Next, the class should devise a series of questions to use on a questionnaire as a means of finding out how people celebrate Christmas. Students then take the questionnaire into the school community to be completed. Finally, students create a classroom display presenting their findings.

 

A range of literacy skills are incorporated in this inquiry process including speaking and listening, reading and viewing, and writing and representing (BOS, 2013, pp. 31-52). Additionally, student written work for the classroom display, as well as the whole class completion of the third column “What I have learnt” in the KWL chart, provides suitable opportunity to assess student learning both in HSIE and literacy outcomes.

 

References:

Board of Studies New South Wales. (2013). NSW syllabus for the Australian curriculum: English K-10 syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

Cooper, J. (2013). Christmas around the world. Retrieved April 5, 2014, from: http://www.whychristmas.com/cultures/

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. Victoria: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Newman, F. & Wehlage, G. (1993). Five standards of authentic instruction. Educational Leadership, 50, 8-12).

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Australia Day: All Things Australian Iconic Australian Songs

Australia Day: All Things Australian        Iconic Australian Songs | I Shared Today with Friends and Family [CUES1] | Scoop.it

"Australian songs have captured our history, the pride we feel in our country and some show our famous Aussie humour."

Jessica Taylor's insight:

 

Context of Learning:

Australia Day is celebrated on the 26th of January each year. It is a public holiday where Australians all over the country celebrate what it means to be Australian. One feature of Australia Day is the emphasis upon iconic Australian symbols and traditions.

 

What is the resource?

This website contains information about unique Australian traditions, icons and culture. One part of the site focuses on Australia’s iconic songs including “Advance Australia Fair”, “Waltzing Matilda” and “Home among Gum Trees”. The site provides song lyrics and a link to a You-tube clip.  Not all the songs listed are appropriate for Early Stage One students, however, the three mentioned above are suitable.

 

Classroom Use:

As a class, students learn one or two iconic Australian songs. Learning “Advance Australia Fair” is particularly useful as the anthem is often sung at school assemblies. “Home among Gum Trees” can incorporate actions (integrating English speaking and listening outcome ENe-6B [Board of Studies, 2013, p. 40]) and can relate to students’ own experiences. In the Blue Mountains many homes are surrounded by gum trees and have a veranda out the front.

 

Before learning these songs some activation of prior knowledge is necessary. Educational psychology has shown how the activation of prior knowledge improves student understanding and meaning making as they can link new ideas to existing knowledge (Walker & Debus, 2002, pp. 2-5). Hence, a class discussion of aspects of Australian life, culture and identity as explored in the song lyrics, accompanied with a connection to student experience, will assist student understanding. Teachers should explicitly explore how these songs celebrate Australian identity which is a significant feature of Australia day. In small groups students could brainstorm through drawing what they think is great about being an Australian and share how they and their families celebrate Australia Day in different and similar ways. Once students have learnt one of the songs, the class could use these brainstormed ideas to compose their own lyrics to the same melody to communicate what they think is special about being Australian. By learning an iconic Australian song and then developing their own version, teachers are helping students participate in elements of Australian tradition and culture which is a focus of Australia Day events shared by students and their families.

 

References:

All Down Under. (2014). Australian songs. Retrieved March 31, 2014, from: http://alldownunder.com/australian-music-songs/

 

Board of Studies New South Wales. (2013). New South Wales syllabus for the Australian curriculum English K-10 syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

Walker, R., & Debus, R. (2002). Educational psychology: advances in learning, cognition and motivation. Change: Transformations in Education, 5, 1-25.

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