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An old-fashioned attitude to WIP in 2013 | Manufacturing Digital

An old-fashioned attitude to WIP in 2013 | Manufacturing Digital | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it
Toyota pioneered modern lean manufacturing and created a highly efficient and reliable manufacturing system that the rest of the world sought to adopt with huge variations in success. A main thrust of Lean philosophy is to closely examine manufacturing processes, find unnecessary steps and eliminate them. The same philosophy suggests that we should only allow room for value adding steps – in terms of value perceived by the customer – as this drives up efficiency and enables us to manufacture simpler and faster. It is said that accumulating work-in-progress through the process ties-up resources and can obscure problems and is therefore deemed to not add value, so conventional Lean thinking is to eliminate this wasteful step.With this thinking comes a generally held view that Lean manufacturing and Accumulation cannot coexist....

Via Michel Baudin
Philip Marris's insight:

Michel Baudin commented, very pertinently I beleive, on this article (see his insight below).

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Michel Baudin's curator insight, September 14, 2013 12:29 AM

The gist of this article is that you should hold just enough WIP to meet your production requirements with the changeover times you currently have and protect your bottlenecks against malfunction in other resources.

 

So far, this is stating the obvious, and a visit to a Toyota plant or even dealership is enough to see that the Toyota system is not one with zero inventory. You see shelves of stampings, bins of bolts, and trees of wire harnesses. The Kanban system involves some inventory, and, in fact, the only approach that doesn't is just-in-sequence.

 

What is considered waste is not all inventory, but unnecessary inventory, accumulated for no valid reason anyone can explain. The article, however, goes further and asserts that it is cheaper to accumulate WIP than to expose and solve the problems that make it necessary, which is a return to the mass-production thinking that was prevalent in pre-Lean operations management.

 

What the Lean successes of the past decades have shown is (1) that the overall costs of WIP were understated and (2) that the ingenuity of production people and engineer was underestimated. You operate today and next week with the resources that you have, dysfunctional as they may be, and you hold WIP as needed to sustain production. As you do this, however, as an organization, you keep working at solving your problems so that you need less and less WIP month by month and quarter by quarter. This perspective is missing from the article.

TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma
The combination of Lean, Six Sigma and Theory Of Constraints. How to build your own system by choosing what works for you.
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How to Achieve Breakthrough By Embracing Your Constraints by Ash Maurya | LeanStack.com

How to Achieve Breakthrough By Embracing Your Constraints by Ash Maurya | LeanStack.com | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

In its early days, Southwest Airlines had to sell one of their planes or face bankruptcy. When most people get hit with a constraint of limited resources like this one, they either fall victim to the constraint and revise their ambition downwards, or they confront the constraint head-on and look for ways to brute-force it. […] They found a way for achieving their goal of keeping their existing routes with three planes instead of four planes. They did this, not by brute-forcing, but embracing their constraint. Here’s how. …


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jean-paul crenn's curator insight, December 20, 2015 3:38 PM

C'est de la contrainte que nait l'oeuvre d'art et.... le modèle économique pérenne !

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Lean Principles course by Prof. John Bicheno | University of Buckingham

Lean Principles course by Prof. John Bicheno | University of Buckingham | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

This classroom-based course is aimed at managers seeking a basic but broad overview of Lean. It covers a wide range of topics, similar to the MSc in Lean Enterprise but in less depth and without the hands-on aspects. The course is one of width rather than depth, although some important topics will be explored in reasonable depth.

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Logical Thinking Process 6-Day European Training by Bill Dettmer - June 2016

Logical Thinking Process 6-Day European Training by Bill Dettmer - June 2016 | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

Logical Thinking Process 6-days course: From 13th to 20th January 2016 – Paris.

“Craft an actionable future and bring your organization to a higher level”

Logical Thinking Process, as the name suggests, uses sound logic and a set of tools or processes to provide executives and system managers an effective method for designing organizational strategy, planning its deployment, evaluating its effectiveness, and making corrections as needed in the shortest possible time.

The LTP can typically produce a completed strategy within a matter of weeks, including the required deployment tasks and activities. It provides an easy way for executives to monitor progress of strategy deployment. In the problem-solving mode, resolution of complex system problems has been designed in as short as a few days and no more than several weeks (the time required for solution implementation varies with the nature of the situation).

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Lean Product and Process Development Exchange (LPPDE) Europe 2016 Conference, April 25 to 28 in Reading, UK

Lean Product and Process Development Exchange (LPPDE) Europe 2016 Conference, April 25 to 28 in Reading, UK | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

The 2016 LPPDE Europe conference will emphasize learning and the importance of basing design decisions on facts, knowledge and proven experience. The conference will provide plenty of opportunities for you to learn about lean product and process development from morning to evening by exchanging your thoughts and ideas with others.

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How 3-D Printing is Revolutionizing Lean Manufacturing | ReliablePlant

How 3-D Printing is Revolutionizing Lean Manufacturing | ReliablePlant | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

Lean manufacturing and 3-D printing go together naturally. While 3-D printing isn't a new technology, it is getting more attention lately because of the potential cost implications for everyone involved. [...] Below are a few reasons why 3-D printing and lean manufacturing go hand in hand.

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13 best Industry Week posts in 2015

13 best Industry Week posts in 2015 | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

Relax and peruse the following content, which I am calling a "dozen plus one" of the IndustryWeek Continuous Improvement newsletter's top stories from 2015.

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Demand Driven Collaboration post by Simon Eagle

Demand Driven Collaboration post by Simon Eagle | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it
In a recent (January 2015) presentation a senior supply chain director at one of the UK’s largest supermarket multiples talked about how UK supermarket groups are going to have to work differently with

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The 2 for 1 rule to reduce WIP and Lead Times | Chris Hohmann

The 2 for 1 rule to reduce WIP and Lead Times | Chris Hohmann | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it
Organizations with high level of Work In Progress also have long Lead Time, according to Little's law. High level of WIP clutter the process and tie cash into the process, while long Lead Times do not help agility nor On Time Deliveries. In order to improve the situation it is necessary to drain the system of…
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Principles of Lean Thinking - Free series of videos by George Trachilis | Lean Leadership Institute

Principles of Lean Thinking - Free series of videos by George Trachilis | Lean Leadership Institute | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

Over 30 videos in 3 modules.

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Amalgamation of Agile and Six Sigma - Post by Mohit Sharma

Amalgamation of Agile and Six Sigma - Post by Mohit Sharma | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

[...] My further study on Agile, made me opine that Six sigma and agile are complementary to each other. In six sigma methodologies, DMADV is more close to Agile, however, Agile could also be used as part of the Improve phase in DMAIC projects.

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Standardization Doesn’t Stamp Out Creativity | The Deming Institute Blog | John Hunter

Standardization Doesn’t Stamp Out Creativity | The Deming Institute Blog | John Hunter | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

"[...] One of the things I find annoying, in this way, is that reducing variation and using standardization is said to mean everyone has to be the same and creativity is stamped out. This is not what Dr. Deming said at all. And the claim makes no sense when you look at how much emphasis he put on joy in work and the importance of using everyone’s creativity. Yet I hear it over and over, decade after decade."


Via Michel Baudin
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Michel Baudin's curator insight, October 27, 2015 10:09 AM

Yes, the metric system did not stifle anybody's creativity. By making commerce, engineering, and science easier, it actually helped creative people innovate, invent, and discover. 

 

But when Deming says "Standardization does not mean that we all wear the same color and weave of cloth, eat standard sandwiches, or live in standard rooms with standard furnishings," he seems to exclude the possibility that standardization could be abused. 


Rather than presenting standardization as a universal good, I think we should restrict its scope to domains where it is useful. Weights and measures is an obvious one, and there are even cases where making people "wear the same color and weave of cloth" makes sense, for example, if crews on airliners didn't wear uniforms, passengers couldn't tell them apart from other passengers. 


On the other hand, the Hollywood formula for romantic comedies is a standard we don't need. We don't need the obligatory chase at the end when one of the heroes has to find a way to prevent the other one leaving forever. 


Even in manufacturing, standards are not always helpful. You don't need a standard for the size of end-balls on motorcycle brake handles. In the 1980s, international committees hammered out comprehensive 7-layered standards on the way computers should communicate, that were set aside by the Internet. (See http://michelbaudin.com/2012/07/09/what-are-standards-for/)


The lack of an obviously useful standard also sometimes has unexpected consequences. In Japan, for example, half the country gets 50Hz power and the other half 60Hz, as a result of which, its electronics industry developed products you can plug into power sources from 97 to 240V and 50 to 60Hz. 


So, let's use standards where they help, but let's not become standardization zealots!



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Synchronix TOC / Lean / Six Sigma / ERP consulting - Vancouver, Canada

Synchronix TOC / Lean / Six Sigma / ERP consulting - Vancouver, Canada | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

Business Performance Improvement using the techniques in "The Goal" – stand-alone or with ERP, Lean, Six Sigma.

Business Performance Improvement that Reaches the Bottom Line. Fast, Direct & Massive. We Simply Make it Work. Since 1988. No Dogma; Just Big Results, Fast, for Small- to Mid-Size Manufacturers. (And, we love Job Shops.)
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"If Japan Can Why Can't We" - 1980 NBC documentary about Dr. W. Edwards Deming - 1h17 video

On June 24, 1980, Americans widely viewed a NBC documentary called “If Japan Can… Why Can’t We.” The program, part of NBC’s White Paper series, prominently featured Dr. W. Edwards Deming. […] This compelling documentary, about the ever-increasing industrial competition between the United States and Japan, introduced Dr. Deming to Americans. For the first time, they learned of the then 80-year old American who was widely credited with the Japanese industrial resurgence after WWII. […] “Would the same methods work in the United States…? Deming’s reply was the catalyst for relentless requests for Deming to help American businesses. Soon the icons of American industry, such as Ford, General Motors, Dow Chemical Company, Xerox and Hughes Aircraft were asking for his help. […] Now you can view the video that started it all.

 

Philip Marris's insight:

One of the most important documentaries in the history of Lean and Six Sigma. It may be old (1980) but unfortunately it is still worth viewing and reviewing.

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Developing Lean Leaders at all Levels: A Practical Guide by Jeffrey Liker and George Trachilis - 2016 Shingo prize winner

2016 winner of the SHINGO RESEARCH AND PROFESSIONAL PUBLICATION AWARD, Developing Lean Leaders at all Levels: A Practical Guide is a management Must Read. The Lean Leadership Development Model (LLDM) presented in this book is intuitive and aligns well with accepted principles of operational excellence.

 

 

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Book review of Lead with respect by Michael and Freddy Ballé | BetterOperations.com

 

A book review of Lead with Respect: a Novel of Lean Practice by Michael Ballé and Freddy Ballé.

“The problem is you”, is the honest response of a senior manager when a supplier’s CEO asks more time to solve a quality issue. He continues: “I don’t mean you as in the company. I mean you personally. You’re the senior manager here”…. This is the intriguing start of a business novel on lean leadership. Here is my brief review of Lead with Respect: a Novel of Lean Practice by Michael Ballé and Freddy Ballé.

 

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Deming, Goldratt and Senge - article by Angela Montgomery

Deming, Goldratt and Senge - article by Angela Montgomery | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

Transforming the Organization into a Whole System

 

Most organizations (and business schools) are lagging behind the times as they still work in silos, missing completely the challenge and opportunity of the complexity that now dominates our world. We need to manage organizations as whole systems.

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How to identify bottlenecks in production and projects - 25 min video | Philip Marris

Philip Marris, CEO of Marris Consulting, explains why you are probably wrong about where your capacity constraints (bottlenecks) are. This conference takes you through a few examples of false bottlenecks and the lessons learned. As a conclusion, he points out that being wrong about where a company’s constraints are is good news since it implies that there are significant opportunities to improve performance drastically and rapidly.

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Michel Baudin's comments on a post about Lean by Bob Emiliani

Michel Baudin's comments on a post about Lean by Bob Emiliani | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it
I agree with him that the most popular "Lean tools" are peripheral at best. None of the ones he mentions -- 5S, visual controls, value stream maps A3 reports, or gemba walks -- would make my list of what should be taught and applied first in a Lean manufacturing implementation. I would, on the other hand, include SMED, cell design, assembly line design based on takt time, etc.

These are the kind of tools I believe Bob means when he says "core industrial engineering methods," the only problem being that you find them neither in the Industrial Engineering Handbook nor in the IE curriculum of most American universities. They have the look and feel of classical IE and should become part of it, but it hasn't happened yet.
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Creating an A3 Learning Org in 5 videos by Bob Petruska | Interview by Joe Dager of Business901

Creating an A3 Learning Org in 5 videos by Bob Petruska | Interview by Joe Dager of Business901 | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

Bob Petruska of Sustain Lean Consulting […] is a consultant, presenter, trainer and author of Gemba Walks for Service Excellence. I [Joe Dager] had the opportunity to discussed a topic of his, Creating a A3 Learning Organization. […] This is part 1 of 5 different videos discussing this concept done through an A3 template.

 

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DDMRP vs MRP | Olivehorse post and 2 page PDF download

DDMRP vs MRP | Olivehorse post and 2 page PDF download | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

Companies who have adopted DDMRP found that they are able to increase their service levels and sales with the same amount of inventory. All that they are doing differently is leveraging strategically placed buffers to ...


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Sorry, But Lean Is About Cost Reduction... 4 page post by Rob van Stekelenborg

Sorry, But Lean Is About Cost Reduction... 4 page post by Rob van Stekelenborg | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it
It seems to be popular these last years and more recently to explicitly state that Lean is not (only) about cost reduction or cost cutting. See the recent posts by Mark Graban or Matt Hrivnak. So let
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The Improvement Kata - 10 min. video by Bill Costantino

Bill Costantino's classic explanation of the Improvement Kata, originally posted as a SlideCast on November 25, 2011. Awesome!
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Conbining Lean and TOC for higher performance - 43 p. PDF circa 2002 by Bill Dettmer

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[Recommended] 23rd International Theory Of Constraints TOCPA Conference, 21-22 March 2016, Tennessee, USA

[Recommended] 23rd International Theory Of Constraints TOCPA Conference, 21-22 March 2016, Tennessee, USA | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

The 23rd TOCPA Conference is conducted on 21-22 March 2016, Tennessee, USA, by TOCPA together with TOC International. Over 15 presentations in two days will look into important issues of TOC knowledge, implementations and developments.

Among the presenters: Gerald Kendall, USA; Oded Cohen, Israel; Jelena Fedurko, Estonia; Daniel Walsh, USA; Eli Schragenheim, Israel; Jeffrey Schraeder, USA; Henry Camp, USA; Janice Cerveny, USA; Keita Asaine, Japan; Ryoma Shiratsuchi, Japan; Alejandro Fernandez, Colombia; Emerson Carr, USA; Dieter Legat, Switzerland. We are waiting for the final confirmation from several other international TOC experts. The conference price is US $350 per person and includes 2-day participation in the conference, breakfasts, lunches and coffee-breaks.

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Pierre Jaeck's curator insight, January 11, 3:31 PM

I recommend too

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Physical contradictions and Evaporating clouds - 15 pages by Darrell Mann and Roy Stratton

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