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An old-fashioned attitude to WIP in 2013 | Manufacturing Digital

An old-fashioned attitude to WIP in 2013 | Manufacturing Digital | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it
Toyota pioneered modern lean manufacturing and created a highly efficient and reliable manufacturing system that the rest of the world sought to adopt with huge variations in success. A main thrust of Lean philosophy is to closely examine manufacturing processes, find unnecessary steps and eliminate them. The same philosophy suggests that we should only allow room for value adding steps – in terms of value perceived by the customer – as this drives up efficiency and enables us to manufacture simpler and faster. It is said that accumulating work-in-progress through the process ties-up resources and can obscure problems and is therefore deemed to not add value, so conventional Lean thinking is to eliminate this wasteful step.With this thinking comes a generally held view that Lean manufacturing and Accumulation cannot coexist....

Via Michel Baudin
Philip Marris's insight:

Michel Baudin commented, very pertinently I beleive, on this article (see his insight below).

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Michel Baudin's curator insight, September 13, 2013 9:29 PM

The gist of this article is that you should hold just enough WIP to meet your production requirements with the changeover times you currently have and protect your bottlenecks against malfunction in other resources.

 

So far, this is stating the obvious, and a visit to a Toyota plant or even dealership is enough to see that the Toyota system is not one with zero inventory. You see shelves of stampings, bins of bolts, and trees of wire harnesses. The Kanban system involves some inventory, and, in fact, the only approach that doesn't is just-in-sequence.

 

What is considered waste is not all inventory, but unnecessary inventory, accumulated for no valid reason anyone can explain. The article, however, goes further and asserts that it is cheaper to accumulate WIP than to expose and solve the problems that make it necessary, which is a return to the mass-production thinking that was prevalent in pre-Lean operations management.

 

What the Lean successes of the past decades have shown is (1) that the overall costs of WIP were understated and (2) that the ingenuity of production people and engineer was underestimated. You operate today and next week with the resources that you have, dysfunctional as they may be, and you hold WIP as needed to sustain production. As you do this, however, as an organization, you keep working at solving your problems so that you need less and less WIP month by month and quarter by quarter. This perspective is missing from the article.

TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma
The combination of Lean, Six Sigma and Theory Of Constraints. How to build your own system by choosing what works for you. This is YOUR COMMUNITY: PLEASE SUBMIT your links by logging in and using the SUGGEST BUTTON below.
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TLS - TOC Lean & Six Sigma LinkedIn discussion group (membership recommended)

TLS - TOC Lean & Six Sigma LinkedIn discussion group (membership recommended) | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

This group aims to bring together all those who are interested in the combination of the Theory Of Constraints, Lean (Manufacturing, Engineering, Management ...) and Six Sigma.

People have been fighting for too long a sterile battle in which they claim that "my approach is better than yours". There is regrettable silo behaviour. The 3 schools of thought - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma - have clearly demonstrated how powerful they are taken individually. We hope that this group will show that when they are intelligently combined companies can improve faster and that they can attain even better levels of performance.

The topics covered are not strictly limited to the 3 entities of TLS. Approaches, tools and ideas that are related are welcome. For example: Cost Accounting, Agile, Scrum, Risk Management, Systems Thinking, (Relevant) Knowledge Management, Internet & Operations, Product & Service design, ERPs, MRP, DRP, MES, DDMRP, Supply Chain Management, New Product Development ...

Philip Marris's insight:

I am (Philip Marris) the administrator of both the Scoop It you are reading and this LinkedIn group.

 

I also administrate a LinkedIn group dedicated to "Critical Chain Project Management" https://www.linkedin.com/groups?home=&trk=anet_ug_hm&gid=5183858

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How to Really See What is Going On in Your Workplace | Jamie Flinchbaugh / IndustryWeek

How to Really See What is Going On in Your Workplace | Jamie Flinchbaugh / IndustryWeek | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

How managers can use the four levels of observation to really see what is going on in their workplace:

1. Stories and anecdotes.

2. Data and graphs.

3. Pictures and diagrams.

4. Direct observation."


Via Michel Baudin
Philip Marris's insight:

Thanks to Michel Baudin for spotting this.

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Michel Baudin's curator insight, August 5, 10:14 PM

Deep down, I believe I agree with Jamie Flinchbaugh on observation, but I am puzzled by the way he phrases it. He describes stories and anecdotes as "the most abstract level of observation." I see them as a means of persuasion, not observation, and concrete, not abstract. 

 

I don't see data as necessarily dependent on assumptions. What assumptions are there behind, say, the number of boxes of Cereal Z you sold last month? It is just a fact. While photographs are a form of data, graphs and diagrams are ways of analyzing data and presenting results, which is also downstream from observation. 

 

For the analysis of a plant, I see three main sources of input:

1. Direct observation of the operations.

2. Interviews with key members of the organization.

3. The organization's data. 

 

The Lean literature justifiably emphasizes direct observation. You go to where the work is being done, and then apply various mental techniques to help you notice relevant characteristics. You may even gather data in the form of photographs an videos for future analysis. 

 

But it cannot be your only source. You also need to know what the manager's ambitions are for the organization, what they have tried to realize them, and what obstacles they feel they have encountered. Their perceptions may or may not agree with what you see with your own eyes, but you need to know what they are. 

 

Finally, any business activity leaves a data trail that should not be ignored, including product and process definitions, current status, history, and plans for the near and distant future. All of this also needs to be reviewed and confronted with direct observation and human perceptions. 

 

It's when you present your conclusions and recommendations that you use stories, graphs, diagrams, pictures, and videos to get your point across. 

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How Do You Use Scoreboards in Manufacturing? - 2 pages | Adrian Pask

How Do You Use Scoreboards in Manufacturing? - 2 pages | Adrian Pask | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

Well-chosen KPIs that are widely communicated and consistently reinforced can be very effective in transforming a group of individuals into a high-performance team. Scoreboards are a proven tool for communicating and reinforcing such KPIs. Scoreboards create focus, communicate information, and encourage your production teams to “win their shift”.

 

 

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Art Smalley - Lean Stability: Toyota’s Secret Ingredient - 47 mins - TWI 2014 conference (Europe) | BusinessThroughPeople.com

Art Smalley - Lean Stability: Toyota’s Secret Ingredient - 47 mins - TWI 2014 conference (Europe) | BusinessThroughPeople.com | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

This session will focus on the early days of the Toyota Production System in the 1950’s and how they got their journey started on the right track with high levels of Lean Stability in the 4M’s of manufacturing.

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Toyota way adopted by hospital in Australia

Toyota way adopted by hospital in Australia | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

[...] the Japanese car maker is introducing its production line skills to a cancer unit, working with St Vincent's Hospital in Melbourne to improve patient treatment times in the oncology ward.  With Toyota's help St Vincent's has already cut the time it takes to prepare hospital script medication from 210 minutes to 34 minutes.

 

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Six Sigma for Sourcing and Procurement, a Bridge Too Far? | Spendmatters.com

Six Sigma, the process measurement methodology originally developed by Motorola and popularized by GE, has far-reaching applications beyond its manufacturing roots. [...] But the bigger questions for procurement leaders to address in considering Six Sigma are these: What level of performance is realistic, which projects would produce the most benefit, and what enabling technologies will be required to apply the DMAIC principles [...] of Six Sigma effectively?

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Mazaaki Imai discusses the early history of Lean - 40 mins | Gemba Academy

Mazaaki Imai discusses the early history of Lean - 40 mins | Gemba Academy | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

Ron Pereira sits down for more than 40 minutes and talks with Mr. Masaaki Imai who is known the world over as the original “Lean Guru” and the father of Continuous Improvement. Mr. Imai has been a pioneer and leader in spreading the kaizen philosophy all over the world. His firsthand account of the history of lean based on his close associations and travels with such legendary giants as Shoichiro Toyoda and Taichi Ohno...

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Jean-Guy Frenette's curator insight, July 26, 7:17 PM

Un guru à connaître!

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Different types of constraints - 3 pages | Focus and Leverage blog by Bob Sproull

Different types of constraints - 3 pages | Focus and Leverage blog by Bob Sproull | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

 [...] There are several definitions of what a constraint is that are floating around the TOC community, but I prefer to keep all definitions simple  [...] a constraint is anything within a system that prohibits or blocks the system from reaching its intended goal.  [...] Let’s now talk about the different types of constraints that might exist within a system or organization.

 

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Cruise Ship Cabins with 14 min. takt time - 2 min video | The Lean Thinker

Cruise Ship Cabins with 14 min. takt time - 2 min video | The Lean Thinker | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines released a cool P.R. video showing the production of cruise ship cabins on an assembly line with a 14 minute(!) takt time. [...] We have to look for the opportunities for what can be set up to flow vs. reasons why we can’t.

 

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WhatIsSixSigma.net

WhatIsSixSigma.net | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

Six Sigma explained in short – All you need to know about six sigma and its benefits for you and your company. [...]

 

Philip Marris's insight:

Sample content (basic free info.) :

    10 Things You Should Know About Six Sigma

    Famous Six Sigma People

    Six Sigma Software

Some recent Posts

    Analytical Hierarchy Process

    Responsible Accountable Consulted Informed Matrix (RACI)

    ANDON

    Plan Do Study Act (PDSA)

    Machince Capability Index

    Entry and Exit Criteria

    Change Acceleration Processes (CAP)

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Dabbawalas' food distribution of Mumbai, a supply chain best practise? - 4 pages | NBC News

Dabbawalas' food distribution of Mumbai, a supply chain best practise? - 4 pages | NBC News | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

In Mumbai, an insurance analyst sits down to a healthy home-cooked meal, still warm from the stove where it was prepared by his wife or mother. India’s commercial capital is a teeming metropolis of nearly 20 million, […] Remarkably, its age-old tradition of home-cooked meals — delivered on wheels — has resisted the momentum of change. The dabbawalas, as they’re known, are the men who make it possible. […] They deliver lunch from home to the office or school every day, monsoon or shine. Some 5,000 dabbawalas dole out over 200,000 meals a day, […] “We take great pride in ensuring delivery even against great odds: We worked through the floods in 2005 and the terrorist attack on Mumbai in November 2008 when most of the city had come to a standstill,” […] Transporting lunches may sound simple but what the dabbawalas do every day is a remarkable feat — one so impressive, in fact, that professors from Harvard Business School have traveled to India to study it.

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Developing Leaders the Toyota Way - Book August 2014 by Liker and Trachilis

Developing Leaders the Toyota Way - Book August 2014 by Liker and Trachilis | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

 […] The reality of any Toyota operation is that it houses a culture of people deliberately taught a method of defining, analyzing, and solving problems to continually drive the company forward. Toyota summarizes this as respect for people and continuous improvement […] In the center of this development are a set of core values: challenge, kaizen, go and see first hand, respect, and teamwork. […] they develop leaders from the top down within their management structure  […]  In fact teaching others  […] is the most important job of any leader. As Toyota says: “If the student has not learned, the teacher has not taught.”

 

To help turn this model from theory to application [the Lean Leadership Institute] developed an online course so it is broadly accessible to large numbers of people. […] we wanted to simulate the Toyota leadership development process, while doing it on-line within a time frame that is manageable for most students— typically about a 4-6 month window. This book arose out of the online course. […] While it is a great companion to the on-line course, we believe it is also useful as a stand-alone book. It builds on The Toyota Way to Lean Leadership, but goes further in providing the how-to of developing lean leaders with many new examples.

 

Jeffrey K. Liker, EVP, Lean Leadership Institute Inc.

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TOC Thinking neatly summarized - 1 page book review and recommendation | Knowledge Jolt with Jack (Vinson)

TOC Thinking neatly summarized - 1 page book review and recommendation | Knowledge Jolt with Jack (Vinson) | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it
Yishai Ashlag's new book, TOC Thinking: Removing Constraints for Business Growth, is a good overview of the Theory of Constraints approach to thinking about running organizations.
Philip Marris's insight:

Published in June 2014 so it is nice and up to date.

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The battle of TOC versus Lean versus Six Sigma | A drawing

The battle of TOC versus Lean versus Six Sigma | A drawing | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it
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TLS and Velocity novel - 1 page by Claude Emond | Project Times

TLS and Velocity novel - 1 page by Claude Emond | Project Times | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

[…] Goldratt and his followers have done it again! This time for the world of continuous improvement management. […] business novel, “Velocity” […] a story telling about realizing rapid and significant continuous improvement results through integrating three approaches: TOC, LEAN and Six Sigma. […] So LEAN, Six-Sigma and the like do not produce good results if applied without taking care of real organisational constraints. […]  traditional approaches have us working very hard to achieve almost no improvements. This integrated approach is even trademarked as iTLS ™ […]

[TLS] is a major breakthrough, that has been going on for at least the last four years. Was I the only one of us sleeping through the birth of TLS? About time I woke up to Velocity!

Philip Marris's insight:

Claude Emond is one of the founders and president of Qualiscope Enterprises, a project management consulting, coaching and training firm based in Montreal, Canada.

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Philip Marris's curator insight, August 1, 3:23 AM

Claude Emond is one of the founders and president of Qualiscope Enterprises, a project management consulting, coaching and training firm based in Montreal, Canada.

Claude Emond's comment, August 1, 5:23 AM
Merci pour le scoopit, Philip :)
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Focus and Leverage Consulting - Bob Sproull and Bruce Nelson

Focus and Leverage Consulting - Bob Sproull and Bruce Nelson | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

Focus and Leverage Consulting (FLC) is all about enhancing the effectiveness, profitability and success in all types of organizations.  But below the surface, FLC is much, much more.  FLC does so not by using traditional methods like Lean or Six Sigma in isolation, but rather by using a new methodology that FLC refers to as TLS or as it was originally named The Ultimate Improvement Cycle (UIC).  TLS is a unique blend of Lean, Six Sigma and the Theory of Constraints which uses the concept of Focus and Leverage to create very significant bottom line improvement in very short periods of time (i.e. weeks, rather than months).  So how do we achieve this improvement in such a short amount of time compared to those using traditional Lean and Six Sigma initiatives?

 

The answer to this question lies in the third piece of this integration, the Theory of Constraints.  We have seen so many Lean and/or Six Sigma implementations that attempt to do what we refer to as, “solving world hunger” by attempting to eliminate waste in every nook and cranny of a process or system.  In reality, there is typically only one place in particular where the improvement efforts should be focused…..the system constraint or bottleneck…especially if you’re trying to improve flow.

 

Philip Marris's insight:

Bob Sproull and Bruce Nelson are among other things the co-authors of the best-selling TLS novel "Epiphanized". Bob Sproull is also the author of the very widely read "Focus ans Leverage blog" (http://focusandleverage.blogspot.com)

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Four myths of lean busted! by Craig Sharp | ProcessExcellenceNetwork.com

Four myths of lean busted! by Craig Sharp | ProcessExcellenceNetwork.com | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

Lean is often considered by outsiders as little more than a cost cutting exercise, a method for reducing waste which doesn’t stop at errors and defects, but cuts a slice out of job satisfaction and job security too. However champions of this process would argue that lean is, in fact, merely misunderstood.  […]

Blowing apart Lean misconceptions […]

#1: Lean is for manufacturing processes only

#2: It’s expensive

#3: Lean is stressful for staff

#4:  Lean = Job losses

 

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Claude Emond's curator insight, July 31, 8:27 AM

Lean is not what many think. Agile and Lean = same collaborative mindset = doing more with what we have before thinking of doing more with less !  It is not about business re-engineering following consultants' recipes. It is about business re-inventing leading change together with our employees and teams, our last planners :) 

Claude Emond's comment, July 31, 8:28 AM
Merci pour le scoop-post, Philip
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TLS, breakthrough or just another tool? | 77 slides by Bob Fox - July 2014 TOCICO webinar

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Lean Six Sigma for Dummies book

Lean Six Sigma for Dummies book | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

Lean Six Sigma is a powerful, proven method of improving business efficiency and effectiveness. In a nutshell, here are the key principles of Lean Six Sigma to bear in mind:

Focus on the customer.

Identify and understand how the work gets done (the value stream) .

Manage, improve and smooth the process flow.

Remove Non-Value-Added steps and waste.

Manage by fact and reduce variation.

Involve and equip the people in the process.

Undertake improvement activity in a systematic way.

 

Philip Marris's insight:

To buy from Amazon.com : http://www.amazon.com/Lean-Six-Sigma-For-Dummies/dp/1119953707/

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How to Meet Challenges with Systems Thinking | SoftwareCreation.org

How to Meet Challenges with Systems Thinking | SoftwareCreation.org | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

system- a group of independent but interrelated elements comprising an integrated whole

systems thinking- the process of understanding how system elements interact to produce system behavior.

The systems are characterized bystructurebehaviorinterconnectionsemerging properties

Systems are everywhere. They interact with each other and environment, belong to other systems and contain own sub systems. In addition, we, humans, constantly create new systems that usually cause more problems than solve.


Via Jürgen Kanz
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Two Mindset Obstacles to Effective Learning (Kata) - 16 slides | Mike Rother

[...] two common mindsets that inhibit learning of new skills. Any team or organization that wants to develop a culture of continuous improvement will do well to use some structured practice routines -- Kata -- for developing scientific skills, especially at the beginning.

 

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APICS Vancouver - Demand Driven seminar by Chad Smith Sept 18 2014 + CDDP session on Sep 16-17

APICS Vancouver - Demand Driven seminar by Chad Smith Sept 18 2014 + CDDP session on Sep 16-17 | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

APICS Vancouver Chapter [...] Demand Driven Operational Principles seminar  [...] Spend the evening learning about  [...] Demand Driven Material Requirements Planning (DDMRP).

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Chesapeake Consulting Inc. - TLS Consultants USA

Chesapeake Consulting Inc. - TLS Consultants USA | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

The Chesapeake Approach challenges your current thinking and rapidly applies best-in-class Theory of Constraints, Lean, Six Sigma, and Leadership Development programs [...] creates custom solutions for our clients through Enterprise Fitness by aligning People and Process to achieve the Purpose of your organization.

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A new constraint in restaurants (and elsewhere?): you and your smartphone...

A new constraint in restaurants (and elsewhere?): you and your smartphone... | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

A busy NYC restaurant kept getting bad reviews for slow service, so they hired a firm to investigate. When they compared footage from 2004 to footage from 2014, they made some pretty startling discoveries...

 

 

Philip Marris's insight:

Thank you Seuils Labs for this nice well documented example of how smartphones reduced a restaurant's Throughput by over 40%. The digital age can impact your business in many ways!

 

Apparently people are starting to call these new constraints "smartlenecks".

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Philip Marris's curator insight, July 15, 1:39 AM

Thank you Seuils Labs for this nice well documented 2 page example of how smartphones reduced a restaurant's Throughput by over 40%. The digital age can impact your business in many ways!

 

Apparently people are starting to call these new constraints "smartlenecks".

Seuils Labs's comment, July 15, 1:46 AM
Make sure you watch this emotionally related video: http://youtu.be/OINa46HeWg8
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Frugal Engineering / Nissan - 2 pages | Harvard Business Review

Frugal Engineering / Nissan - 2 pages | Harvard Business Review | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

Carlos Ghosn, Chairman and CEO of the Renault-Nissan Alliance, famously coined the term "frugal engineering" in 2006. He was impressed by Indian engineers' ability to innovate cost-effectively ...

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Certified Demand Driven Planner course - Ecuador Sept 9-10 2014

Certified Demand Driven Planner course - Ecuador Sept 9-10 2014 | TLS - TOC, Lean & Six Sigma | Scoop.it

CDDP - Certified Demand Driven Planner  Workshop y Examen CDDP program is Developed by Demand Driven Institute and managed by ISCEA

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