TJMS United State...
Follow
Find
472 views | +0 today
TJMS United States History
Articles and resources relevant to the study of 8th grade U.S. History
Curated by Arlis Groves
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Arlis Groves from Community Village World History
Scoop.it!

Life-size replica showing the amount of space enslaved people had on the Middle Passage.

Life-size replica showing the amount of space enslaved people had on the Middle Passage. | TJMS United States History | Scoop.it

By Andrew Pegoda 

 

I wanted to share part of Tim’s project, and lucky for you (!), he gave permission to do so. (Make sure to check out the blog he created for the class!) In the pictures below, you’ll see his replica of approximately how much space enslaved Blacks had on the Middle Passage. On ships using the “tight packing” method, each person had somewhere around 6′ by 16″ by 30″. Tim’s replica would be the amount of space for two or three people. 

 

Continue reading...

 


Via Community Village Sites
Arlis Groves's insight:

Space for Africans on slavers varied, but descriptions always horrify us.  See the observations from PBS.org:  


The slaves were branded with hot irons and restrained with shackles. Their "living quarters" was often a deck within the ship that had less than five feet of headroom -- and throughout a large portion of the deck, sleeping shelves cut this limited amount of headroom in half.4 Lack of standing headroom was the least of the slaves' problems, though. With 300 to 400 people packed in a tiny area5 -- an area with little ventilation and, in some cases, not even enough space to place buckets for human waste -- disease was prevalent. According to Equiano, "The closeness of the place, and the heat of the climate, added to the number in the ship, which was so crowded that each had scarcely room to turn himself, almost suffocated us. This produced copious perspirations, so that the air soon became unfit for respiration, from a variety of loathsome smells, and brought on a sickness among the slaves, of which many died."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arlis Groves
Scoop.it!

On Its 150th Anniversary, a Graphic Retelling of Lee’s Surrender at Appomattox

On Its 150th Anniversary, a Graphic Retelling of Lee’s Surrender at Appomattox | TJMS United States History | Scoop.it
Excerpted from Battle Lines: A Graphic History of the Civil War by Jonathan Fetter-Vorm and Ari Kelman. Out in May from Hill and Wang. A hundred and fifty years ago today, the Civil War ended. It ended quietly, in a farmhouse in Virginia, when Gen. Grant and Gen. Lee negotiated the terms...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arlis Groves
Scoop.it!

The Courage And Ingenuity Of Freedom-Seeking Slaves In America

The Courage And Ingenuity Of Freedom-Seeking Slaves In America | TJMS United States History | Scoop.it
Did daring stories of fugitive slaves perhaps move the national political needle toward abolition?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arlis Groves
Scoop.it!

Gadsden Purchase Establishes US-Mexico Border

Gadsden Purchase Establishes US-Mexico Border | TJMS United States History | Scoop.it
On December 30, 1853, the United States and Mexico established their existing border with the completion of the Gadsden Purchase.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arlis Groves
Scoop.it!

History vs. Andrew Jackson - James Fester

History vs. Andrew Jackson - James Fester | TJMS United States History | Scoop.it
Andrew Jackson was both beloved and loathed during his presidency. In this imaginary courtroom, you get to be the jury, considering and weighing Jackson’s part in the spoils system, economic depression, and the Indian Removal Act, as well as his patriotism and the pressures of the presidency. James Fester explores how time shapes our relationship to controversial historical figures.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arlis Groves
Scoop.it!

The Invisible Blue-Jean Particles in the Original Star-Spangled Banner

The Invisible Blue-Jean Particles in the Original Star-Spangled Banner | TJMS United States History | Scoop.it
The American flag at the Smithsonian has collected blue cotton fibers over the years, but not as many as popular legend says.
Arlis Groves's insight:
In the 1960s, the Smithsonian opted to put the flag in the only Smithsonian building that was air conditioned, thinking the cool temperature would help preserve the aging flag. But in the most extensive conservation project in the flag's history, conservationists like Thomassen-Krauss found that exhibits designed to protect the flag were in fact doing the opposite.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arlis Groves
Scoop.it!

Mission 3 | Mission US | THIRTEEN

Mission 3 | Mission US | THIRTEEN | TJMS United States History | Scoop.it
Arlis Groves's insight:

This is an award-winning interactive learning site.  See what you think.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Arlis Groves from Community Village World History
Scoop.it!

The Invasion of America - Video

 

Between 1776 and 1887, the United States seized (stole) over 1.5 billion acres from America's indigenous people by treaty and executive order. The Invasion of America shows how by mapping every treaty and executive order during that period. It concludes with a map of present-day federal Indian reservations.



Via Community Village Sites
Arlis Groves's insight:

Westward Movement, or the growth of the United States, meant that the land was taken from Native Americans.  This animated map helps us visualize the scope and sequence of the nation's growth and the decline of Native American lands between 1776 and 2010.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arlis Groves
Scoop.it!

Chinese Americans in Mississippi under Jim Crow

Chinese Americans in Mississippi under Jim Crow | TJMS United States History | Scoop.it
A guest post by commenter Jefe: Chinese Americans in Mississippi under Jim Crow (1877-1967) were classified as "colored". In the 1920s, when it started to affect the education of their children, th...
Arlis Groves's insight:

This article addresses one of the questions students often ask during our study of the nation after Reconstruction.  "What about people who weren't either black or white?"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arlis Groves
Scoop.it!

PBS KIDS: The Democracy Project | President For A Day

Meet US presidents past and present, make campaign buttons and learn about US history and the election process.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arlis Groves
Scoop.it!

Newsy | Facebook

WHAT A FIND? A well-known underwater explorer believes he's found the HOLY GRAIL OF SHIPWRECKS. Sitting on the ocean floor for more than 500 years just off the coast of Haiti — possibly Christopher Columbus' Santa Maria.

Among the wreckage, Clifford says he found a cannon of 15th century design, making it difficult for the weapon to come from anything but Columbus' fleet. (WATCH)
Arlis Groves's insight:

Could it be?  We'll all stay tuned to see what the experts decide.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Arlis Groves from Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

Selected Online Works by Civil War Era African American Women (Virtual Programs & Services, Library of Congress)

Selected Online Works by Civil War Era African American Women (Virtual Programs & Services, Library of Congress) | TJMS United States History | Scoop.it
Selected Online Works by Civil War Era African American Women Bibliography (Virtual Services and Programs, Digital Reference Section, Library of Congress) (RT @MAAHMuseum Check out @librarycongress's guide to online works by African American women...

Via Kristen McDaniel
Arlis Groves's insight:

As a teacher always looking for primary sources authored by lesser-known individuals, I'm pleased that this resource exists and is available to my students.

more...
Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, March 10, 2014 4:44 PM

The Library of Congress has organized a webpage around primary sources by Civil War era African-American women - what a treasure trove of primary sources!

Scooped by Arlis Groves
Scoop.it!

6 Civil War Battles After Appomattox — HISTORY Lists

6 Civil War Battles After Appomattox — HISTORY Lists | TJMS United States History | Scoop.it
Robert E. Lee’s surrender did not officially end the Civil War. Find out where the fighting continued in the weeks after Appomattox.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arlis Groves
Scoop.it!

Most native tongues of the West are all but lost

Most native tongues of the West are all but lost | TJMS United States History | Scoop.it
A map shows where just over 60 languages remain spoken around the region.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Arlis Groves from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

What Your Favorite Sport Looked Like When It Was Invented

What Your Favorite Sport Looked Like When It Was Invented | TJMS United States History | Scoop.it
No Helmets And Less Padding

Via Seth Dixon
Arlis Groves's insight:

They're all here.  What's your favorite sport?  

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arlis Groves
Scoop.it!

Dolley Madison Saves Washington's Portrait Video - Andrew Jackson - HISTORY.com

Dolley Madison Saves Washington's Portrait Video - Andrew Jackson - HISTORY.com | TJMS United States History | Scoop.it
Hear the tale of how first lady Dolley Madison risked her life to save George Washington's portrait from a fiery fate as British troops approached the White House.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arlis Groves
Scoop.it!

What you might not know about the Declaration of Independence - Kenneth C. Davis

What you might not know about the Declaration of Independence - Kenneth C. Davis | TJMS United States History | Scoop.it
In June 1776, a little over a year after the start of the American Revolutionary War, the US Continental Congress huddled together in a hot room in Philadelphia to talk independence. Kenneth C. Davis dives into some of the lesser known facts about the process of writing the Declaration of Independence and questions one very controversial omission.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Arlis Groves from Community Village World History
Scoop.it!

Chinese Exclusion Act

Chinese Exclusion Act | TJMS United States History | Scoop.it

 

"The Chinese Exclusion Act (1882) was a US law that shut off all immigration from China to the US except for scholars, merchants, diplomats and professionals. It is where the American idea of “illegal aliens” comes from, the beginning of the country’s racist immigration policies.


At first immigration from China was limited, then Japan and Korea (1907), then the Asiatic Barred Zone (1917) and then southern and eastern Europe (1924). On top of that, Chinese and Mexicans were being driven out by violence and deportation.


That is why the US was so lily-white in the 1950s. Some think of that as the “natural” state of the country, but it was the creation of a set of racist policies that began with the Chinese Exclusion Act, policies that were not overturned till 1965."

 


Via Community Village Sites
more...
Community Village Sites's curator insight, June 3, 2014 7:20 PM


There was a China town in San Jose, CA (south of San Francisco) that burned down – twice! It is no longer there. However, there is a small Japan Town now in San Jose and a ‘Little Saigon’.


Rescooped by Arlis Groves from Community Village World History
Scoop.it!

The Incomplete List of US Companies & Universities That Benefited From Black Slavery

The Incomplete List of US Companies & Universities That Benefited From Black Slavery | TJMS United States History | Scoop.it

 

Americans tend to think that only the South or only slave traders and slave owners benefited from slavery.


But it was not that simple. Slaves and land were the main forms of wealth in the US before 1860. Therefore slaves figured in insurance policies and bank loans. Therefore universities turned to slave owners and slave traders to raise money. Industry in the North and in Britain made money processing slave-grown tobacco, cotton and sugar from the South and the Caribbean. Railway companies used slave labour. The most profitable activity on Wall Street was – the slave trade.


For example:


Click through for list



Via Community Village Sites
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arlis Groves
Scoop.it!

Sheppard Software's U.S. Government Games Menu

Fun games to teach you about how the U.S. government works!
Arlis Groves's insight:

Match the power of government with the correct branch.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Arlis Groves from Southmoore AP United States History
Scoop.it!

The Presidency - U.S. Grant and the Crisis of Reconstruction | C-SPAN

The Presidency - U.S. Grant and the Crisis of Reconstruction | C-SPAN | TJMS United States History | Scoop.it
We hear from UCLA historian Joan Waugh about the different kind of fight that Ulysses S.

Via Mr. David Burton
more...
No comment yet.