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North American forest products freight up 0.8%

North American forest products freight up 0.8% | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it
North American forest products rail freight was up 0.8% in the latest week ending Nov. 7, 2015, from a year ago to 18,067 carloads, the Assn of American Railroads reported. Volume through 44 weeks of 2015 at 824,635 carloads was 0.2% under a year ago.
US forest products freight in the week was down 1.8% and year-to-date was 2.6% lower. Canadian volume in the week was up 4.1% and year-to-date was 3.8% higher. Mexico was up 30.2% in the week and 26% lower year-to-date.
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Ontario experiencing delays in shipping forest products to United States

Ontario experiencing delays in shipping forest products to United States | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

Current delays in shipping forest products to the United States are being experienced by Ontario forestry companies and The Ontario Forest Industries Association (OFIA) is expressing significant concern on the matter.


The delays are a direct result of a major lack of rail cars being provided by key railway carriers. The inability of Ontario companies to ship their products across the United States border is causing substantial losses in market share, something that OFIA believes could have long lasting impacts for Ontario’s forest sector.


“With the return of markets in the United States, we are seeing a corresponding increase in the demand for Ontario forest products. Unfortunately, we believe that Canadian Class 1 railroads have clearly underestimated both the magnitude of the recovery and the number of rail cars needed to ensure that Ontario products make it to market” says Jamie Lim, President and CEO of OFIA.

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Timber trucks rumble through downtown Duluth in protest

Timber trucks rumble through downtown Duluth in protest | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

More than 50 logging trucks, most loaded with timber, caravaned through downtown Duluth this morning.


The loggers are trying to draw attention to their effort to change federal law to allow them to carry heavier loads on interstate highways. Currently they can weigh 90,000 pounds on state roads, but only 80,000 pounds on the freeway.

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Forest industry leaders plan review of options to strengthen timber hauling

Forest industry leaders plan review of options to strengthen timber hauling | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it
The U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities (Endowment) released a report–Enhancing the Strength and Vitality of the Nation’s Timber Harvesting/Hauling Network –from a late summer convening of sector leaders that explored opportunities to strengthen the nation’s timber harvesting and hauling link in the forest products value chain. The report contains a commitment by participants to explore and test 21st century solutions to what the group considers the most significant bottleneck in the system – hauling or trucking wood from timber harvesting sites to manufacturing facilities.
“As the economy has rebounded from the Great Recession, it appears that every segment of the business community faces a common challenge – finding and training qualified truck drivers to get their raw materials and products to market,” said Endowment President & CEO Carlton Owen. “This bottleneck is perhaps even more acute in the forest sector than it is in others markets.”
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Forest products logistics resilient, lucky after Hurricane Sandy

Forest products logistics resilient, lucky after Hurricane Sandy | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

Forest products logistics was largely spared from the effects of Hurricane Sandy that hit the New Jersey coast one week ago. Within two to three days of the storm passing, most of the ports, trucking and railways with dedicated forest products breakbulk services were resuming services. This was largely due to the resiliency of the logistics infrastructure, but also to the luck that Sandy made landfall farther north.


Most of the East Coast ports dedicated forest products transport and distribution lie in the South and Mid-Atlantic region. The Port of Wilmington, North Carolina, the Port of Baltimore and the Port of Philadelphia, experienced some closures as precautions for the storm, but no significant damage was reported. These ports all resumed full operations within days after the storm.


The Port of New York and New Jersey, the largest container port on the East Coast, took the brunt of Sandy's 90+ miles per hour winds and flooding. However, by the Sunday, two terminals in Port Elizabeth, N.J. received calls from container ships. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey also said two more terminals, Port Newark Container Terminal and Global Terminal, would reopen today, leaving only two container terminals still closed.


Road closures due to flooding and power outages continue to cause the most disruptions to logistics in the Northeast after Sandy. Many trucking companies held their drivers off the road until the storm passed, in part due to transportation restrictions. CSX and Norfolk Southern railroads told customers to expect shipments delayed up to 72 hours after the storm as railways came back online. Gasoline shortages are causing delays in areas closest to the New York area.

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ILA strike could affect forest products volumes

ILA strike could affect forest products volumes | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

US ports on the East and Gulf Coasts are bracing for a potential strike at the end of the September after talks broke down between the International Longshoreman's Association (ILA) and the United States Maritime Alliance (USMX), which represents the ports' waterfront management.


Forest products traffic through as many as 14 ports could be affected by a strike, although the extent may be different for each port. These ports handle the vast majority of pulp and paper, lumber and timber breakbulk volumes for the eastern half of the US. In addition, nearly 95 percent of all containerized traffic for the East Coast would be impacted.

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