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State Signs Off On Wetlands Loss For $65M Sand Processing Project

State Signs Off On Wetlands Loss For $65M Sand Processing Project | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

The state has granted permission for a timber company to fill wetlands as part of a $65 million sand processing plant and rail spur in Monroe County.

 

Company officials say the project will pair economic development with environmental preservation. However, environmental advocates say the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources may have contradicted state law when it granted the company a wetland permit.

 

The DNR approved the permit last week for Meteor Timber’s plans to fill about 16 acres of wetlands as part of the project. Meteor Timber is proposing the multi-million dollar project as part of plans to process sand from a nearby mine, which would then be shipped to customers in North Dakota and Texas.

 

Company spokesman Evan Zeppos said the project protects more than 40 acres of wetland for every acre impacted.

"When you look at a project that is impacting 16 but preserving another 643, many of which are high-quality wetlands, and you add in things like the Rudd Creek restoration, the eco-passages, as well as the $65 million investment and 100 new jobs, I think this project warrants support," Zeppos said.

 

In an environmental review, the DNR acknowledged the project could set a precedent by using wetland preservation as a means of mitigation. The agency also points out the project would impact wetlands primarily in a white pine-red maple swamp, which is considered an "imperiled" wetland community in Wisconsin.

 

Environmentalists question whether the DNR approved the company’s wetland permit in accordance with state law. Stacy Harbaugh, communications director for Midwest Environmental Advocates, said the DNR also points out that the loss of white pine-red maple swamp "is expected to be irreversible and has high significance."

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House Passes Bill to Hasten Timber Projects in Forests

House Passes Bill to Hasten Timber Projects in Forests | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it
The House passed a bill Thursday designed to improve the health of national forests by scaling back the environmental reviews that go into some timbering projects and discouraging lawsuits that delay projects.

The goal is to speed up timber harvests and underbrush removal that the U.S. Forest Service deems necessary to improve the health of national forests, which are taking a hit from drought, density and infestation. Altogether, up to 40 percent of the entire national forest system is in need of treatment to reduce the threat of catastrophic wildfire and disease.

The bill meets the Obama administration partway when it comes to treating some wildfires like other federal disasters when it comes to tapping federal funds, but doesn't go as far as the administration wanted and subsequently generated White House opposition.

As a result, it's unclear what progress the bill will make after clearing the House by a vote of 262-167.

House Republicans have long sought more aggressive tree removal from national forest lands. Past efforts required the government to increase the amount of timber offered for sale. This time, the focus was on reducing regulatory hurdles and lawsuits. Republican Rep. Tom McClintock of California said the nation's forests have been consigned to a policy of benign neglect and are now dangerously overgrown.

"Excess timber comes out of the forest one way or the other," McClintock said. "It's either carried out or burned out."

Nineteen Democratic lawmakers, mostly from rural areas, supported the bill.
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Group Challenges Timber Producer's 'Green' Label

Group Challenges Timber Producer's 'Green' Label | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

A watchdog group is challenging the environmentally friendly "green lumber" certification for Plum Creek Timberlands, one of the nation's biggest landowners and timber producers.

The Center for Sustainable Economy, based in Lake Oswego, Oregon, filed the complaint Thursday with a nonprofit group that verifies whether timber producers follow standards for environmentally responsible logging, including replanting after harvest, protecting water and biological diversity, and complying with environmental laws and regulations.

The complaint covers Plum Creek logging in Oregon's Coast Range, citing 11 civil citations over the past six years for violating state logging regulations, including four citations for exceeding the clear-cutting limit of 120 acres. The complaint includes Google Earth images showing landslides in areas stripped of trees by Plum Creek.

"The fragmentation caused by large clear-cuts is a driver of extinction for wildlife dependent upon interior forest conditions and one of the most damaging ecological impacts associated with forest operations in Oregon," the complaint said.

The company also was cited for failing to protect riparian zones along fish-bearing streams, allowing logging road drainage into a stream and failing to notify state regulators of changes in logging operations.

Seattle-based Plum Creek said in a statement that it was aware of the complaint and reviewing it.


"Plum Creek is committed to practicing sustainable forestry where ever we operate," company spokeswoman Kathy Budinick said in an email. "There is an established process in place for handling such complaints, and we will engage fully in the process to understand and address this complaint."

On its website, the company states prominently that all its timberlands are certified by the nonprofit Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

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Elliott State Forest parcel to be sold to Seneca Jones, drawing environmental lawsuit

Elliott State Forest parcel to be sold to Seneca Jones, drawing environmental lawsuit | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

The Oregon Department of State Lands has struck a deal to sell a 788-acre parcel of the Elliott State Forest near Coos Bay to the Seneca Jones Timber Co. for $1.8 million.


The timber company’s owner, Kathy Jones, had said the company pursued the land, which it intends to clear cut parts of, to provoke a fight with environmental groups.


It certainly worked: Three environmental groups filed suit Monday to block the purchase and simultaneously sought a temporary injunction to prevent the sale of part of the 93,000-acre state forest.


Two other parcels in the Elliott are also being sold to a timber company, a development announced Monday by the Department of State Lands. The Scott Timber Co. was the winning bidder on two other parcels in the state forest being sold, the agency said, with a $787,000 bid on 355 acres called Benson Ridge and a $1.8 million bid on a 310-acre slice of Adams Ridge.


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Rothschild biomass plant only getting 10 percent of fuel from forest waste as proposed

Rothschild biomass plant only getting 10 percent of fuel from forest waste as proposed | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

The recently built power plant at Domtar paper mill in central Wisconsin is getting only 10 percent of its fuel from logging waste, which originally was supposed to supply nearly all of the plant's energy needs.

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We Energies told the Wisconsin Public Service Commission in its permit applications which were required to build the facility, that logging waste would supply the vast majority of the plant’s fuel. The PSC approved the plant’s construction over the objection of neighbors and critics in the wood industry who said forest waste would not provide enough fuel for the operation and that the plant inevitably would drive up wood prices.

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Domtar initially targeted tree tops and other logging waste as its anchor fuel for the power plant, said Jeff Plunkett, the company’s procurement manager. Instead, wood from land cleared of trees for expanding farms and housing developments and residue from saw mills and paper mills has been a “huge source for us,” he said.

Sam Radcliffe's insight:

"...expanding farms and housing developments..." Are we really talking about northern Wisconsin? 

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Europe Seeks Green Fuel in U.S. Forests

Europe Seeks Green Fuel in U.S. Forests | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

Loggers here are clear-cutting a wetland forest with decades-old trees. Behind the move: an environmental push.

The push isn't in North Carolina but in Europe, where governments are trying to reduce fossil-fuel use and carbon-dioxide emissions. Under pressure, some of the Continent's coal-burning power plants are switching to wood.


But Europe doesn't have enough forests to chop for fuel, and in those it does have, many restrictions apply. So Europe's power plants are devouring wood from the U.S., where forests are bigger and restrictions fewer.

This dynamic is bringing jobs to some American communities hard hit by mill closures. It is also upsetting conservationists, who say cutting forests for power is hardly an environmental plus.

Sam Radcliffe's insight:

Thanks to Jeff Wikle for this.


Today's (6/6/13) WSJ has several letters to the editor related to this article.http://goo.gl/MMh9e

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Environmental Group Fights Delay In Marbled Murrelet Habitat Protections

Environmental Group Fights Delay In Marbled Murrelet Habitat Protections | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

An environmental group has stopped an agreement between the timber industry and federal wildlife officials that would have delayed  new protections for a threatened seabird.


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service settled with the timber industry group, the American Forest Resource Council, last summer, to avoid a legal battle over for the marbled murrelet.


The industry group argued that maps of protected areas called "critical habitat" had been done improperly.


Fish and Wildlife agreed to suspend the current maps ­ but draft new ones. But, that agreement, and the protracted timeline ­ that it would take five years ­ drew a legal challenge from the Center for Biological Diversity.

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Federal scientists argued since other protections are in place, removing critical habitat wouldn't harm the murrelet.


The judge disagreed and blocked the deal.


A timber industry spokeswoman intends to reach a new agreement, noting that the judge appeared open to a settlement if it comes with "some modification."

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High court rules for timber industry over road runoff

High court rules for timber industry over road runoff | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday endorsed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's long-standing decision not to require Clean Water Act permits for stormwater that runs off logging roads.

The nine-member court ruled on a 7-1 vote, with Justice Stephen Breyer recused, that the EPA's conclusion was a reasonable interpretation of the law.


The dispute - centering on two cases that the court consolidated - has attracted intense interest from the timber industry, which is keen to be exempt from Clean Water Act permitting. A total of 31 state attorneys general weighed in to support Oregon, which also opposes permitting.

The case arose when the environmental group, the Northwest Environmental Defense Center, challenged EPA's interpretation of the law as it applied to two roads in the Tillamook State Forest in Oregon by suing logging road operators in federal court.


In Wednesday's opinion, Justice Anthony Kennedy, writing for the majority, said that it was reasonable for EPA to conclude that runoff from logging roads did not fit within the definition in the Clean Water Act and associated regulations of the term "industrial activity."


Kennedy also noted that states already regulate logging roads, meaning the EPA "could reasonably have concluded that further regulation in this area would be duplicative or counterproductive."


Justice Antonin Scalia wrote a dissenting opinion in which he disagreed with the majority's view that the EPA interpretation of the law was reasonable.

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The forest roads legal quagmire is now here

The forest roads legal quagmire is now here | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

As expected, the new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rule clarifying that logging is not an industrial activity under the Clean Water Act (CWA) has precipitated a legal quagmire.  Last Friday the Northwest Environmental Defense Center (NEDC) filed a new lawsuit in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, challenging the EPA rule.  This comes just ahead of the Supreme Court’s order today inviting further briefing on the impact of the EPA’s rule on Decker v. NEDC currently pending before that Court.


Since the EPA rule applies nationwide, the new round of litigation initiated by NEDC will have nationwide implications.  In other words, whatever the Ninth Circuit ultimately decides will apply not only on the West Coast, but also on the East Coast and every state in between.  This is precisely why we urged EPA not to finalize a rule ahead of the Supreme Court proceedings. The result could be another round of costly litigation for forest owners.

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In Oregon, Residents Struggle to Solve a Pesticide Mystery

In Oregon, Residents Struggle to Solve a Pesticide Mystery | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

Herbicide has become a crucial tool for the state's $13 billion timber industry. But in spite of precautions, lab results suggest that harmful chemicals are finding their way into residents' bloodstreams.

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Timber firms help state defend logging plan

Timber firms help state defend logging plan | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

A federal judge has granted a request by several logging industry firms to join Gov. John Kitzhaber and other state officials in defending Oregon’s plan to allow more logging in Coast Range forests.


The lawsuit filed by three environmental groups — Cascadia Wildlands, the Center for Biological Diversity and the Audubon Society of Portland — claims the state’s logging goals in the coastal Elliott, Tillamook and Clatsop state forests illegally harm the habitat of the threatened marbled murrelet, which is protected under the Endangered Species Act. The seabird lays its eggs on the large, mossy branches of mature and old-growth trees.


State officials have said they have a forest management plan to protect the seabird. However, they have voluntarily suspended logging on 10 timber sales until District Judge Ann Aiken rules on the environmentalists’ motion for an injunction.

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How Logging Road Pollution Landed on The Supreme Court Docket

How Logging Road Pollution Landed on The Supreme Court Docket | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear an appeal in a case that examines whether sediment running off logging roads is industrial pollution and should be more tightly regulated.


The case could affect thousands of miles of roads. It’s being closely watched by the timber industry, clean water advocates, and politicians in the Northwest.

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Conservationists sue Oregon to increase protection for marbled murrelet

Conservationists sue Oregon to increase protection for marbled murrelet | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

Three environmental groups filed a lawsuit Thursday, alleging state timber harvests violate federal law by killing and harassing marbled murrelets, a bird protected by the Endangered Species Act.


The lawsuit comes as Oregon land managers are implementing a plan to increase logging on the 93,000-acre Elliott State Forest between Reedsport and Coos Bay.

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How credit stacking can grow money on trees

How credit stacking can grow money on trees | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

There has been significant discussion about the merits of stacking conservation payments over the past few years.

A simple explanation for credit stacking is when landowners are paid for conservation practices on their property that provide multiple benefits to the environment.

 

For example, an acre of forest could earn revenue from both carbon credits (for maintaining carbon stored in the ground) and endangered species habitat credits (for managing land to benefit species that are endangered, threatened or otherwise at-risk) — this acre generates extra value and therefore can earn revenue from multiple credit types.

 

Credit types that might be stacked include: endangered species; water quality; wetlands; and carbon. Environmental credit stacking will be an important factor for forestland owners to consider as they attempt to generate adequate cash flow for their properties, and as the regulated carbon market grows.


One key issue that always seems to arise in the credit stacking debate is the potential for double-counting.

 

For instance, being required by law to do one thing, such as the creation of a wetland mitigation bank, but also receiving a second payment for another credit type, such a carbon. No one disputes that restoring a single property can deliver several ecosystem benefits; however, how these benefits are measured, and whether they can all be "counted" as ecosystem credits is often debated.

 

The Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI) most recent work on credit stacking (PDF) attempts to sort out these issues, and suggests multiple benefits can be quantified while still being scientifically legitimate. An example is that the same agricultural practice can generate a measurable nutrient credit from reduced fertilizer use as well as create a carbon offset without double-counting.

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Video: popular misconceptions about the timber industry

Discover the truths to popular misconceptions about the timber industry.

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STATE FOREST BOARD APPROVES MORE SCRUTINY OF LANDSLIDE PRONE SITES BEFORE TIMBER HARVESTS

STATE FOREST BOARD APPROVES MORE SCRUTINY OF LANDSLIDE PRONE SITES BEFORE TIMBER HARVESTS | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it
Just under seven months from when the devastating Oso mudslide in Snohomish County claimed the lives of 43 people and buried a portion of State Route 530, the main roadway to communities like Darrington, the Washington State Forest Practices Board has voted unanimously to expand the authority of the State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to require landowners to provide additional technical information when planning timber harvests near potentially unstable slopes that could affect public safety.

The board reached the decision at its regular quarterly meeting Wednesday.
 
“Current rules prohibit timber harvests and other forest practices where they are likely to influence the further movement of an unstable slope,” said Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark. “These new procedures will apply an additional level of scrutiny, based on the best science available, to further protect the safety of the public and its natural resources.”
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Feds suspect wetlands illegally drained at NCSU's Hofmann Forest

Feds suspect wetlands illegally drained at NCSU's Hofmann Forest | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

Two federal agencies are investigating whether the managers of N.C. State University’s massive Hofmann Forest violated the Clean Water Act by illegally draining wetlands.


An N.C. State University foundation is in the midst of selling the 79,000-acre forest to a company headed by a large-scale farmer from the Midwest. A small group of foresters and environmentalists is fighting the $150 million deal in court.


Regulators from the Army Corps of Engineers visited the forest in January to check the ditches there after the N.C. Coastal Federation asked the Corps about the history of several thousand acres of cleared land in the forest. The regulators found extensive draining by ditches. Mickey Sugg, a regulator with the Corps’ Wilmington office, said in an interview this week that at least some of the drainage work appeared to be illegal.


The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency also is involved in the investigation, and it will determine whether the ditching falls within anexemption in the Clean Water Act that allows some drainage improvements for tree farming, Sugg said.

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Feds to review Oregon timberland herbicides probe

Feds to review Oregon timberland herbicides probe | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

Federal scientists have agreed to review the environmental evidence gathered by state agencies after rural residents in Curry County complained they got sick after being sprayed by herbicides meant for nearby timberlands.


Scientists from the federal Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry will work with Oregon state agencies to determine whether enough environmental data has been gathered to make a meaningful determination of the pesticide exposure in the community, spokeswoman Susan McBreairty said Thursday.


If there is enough data, the scientists from the agency _ a branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention _ will do the evaluation.

The pesticides watchdog group Beyond Toxics of Eugene had petitioned the agency to get involved in the investigation into complaints last October from two dozen residents of the Cedar Valley area north of Gold Beach. They complained of vomiting, coughing, loss of balance, skin rashes, blurry vision and other ailments. Some also reported their animals were sickened.
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The Oregon Department of Agriculture has been investigating. In November, department pesticides program manager Dale Mitchell said the agency monitored the Oct. 16 spraying on nearby timberlands owned by Crook Timberlands LLC of Coos Bay. After people complained of being sick, vegetation samples from four properties were taken.
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On Friday, Crook Timberlands manager Rick Barnes denied their spraying operation was the source of helicopters and spray seen by Cedar Valley residents. He said the helicopter they hired was loaded from a site on their property, and never flew over Cedar Valley. He added that a person from Oregon Department of Forestry was on site monitoring. Barnes said he has identified another spray operation going on that day, and passed the information on to Department of Agriculture. He would not identify the company.
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The Oregon Public Health Division has a longstanding cooperative agreement with Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry to look into the effects of chemical exposures and human health, said division spokesman Jonathan Modie. Pokarney said the federal agency has not contacted the Department of Agriculture yet. Oregon Department of Forestry spokesman Dan Postrel said they have not been contacted, either.


Herbicides are commonly used on privately owned industrial forests to control bush, allowing tree seedlings to grow more quickly.

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Real-time map of all forests on Earth launches next month

Real-time map of all forests on Earth launches next month | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it
An online map that tracks in near real-time the vegetation area of all the world's forests simultaneously will launch next month, after a preview was shown at a United Nations summit yesterday....
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Judge Halts Timber Sale East Of Eugene

Judge Halts Timber Sale East Of Eugene | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

A federal judge has blocked a proposed logging project on the Willamette National Forest, saying the government must first do an environmental impact statement, or EIS.


Conservation groups Oregon Wild and Cascadia Wildlands challenged the 2,100 acre Goose Project in Eugene Federal Court.

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Residents collected nearly 5,000 signatures opposing the Goose Timber Sale. Heiken says if the Forest Service focuses on thinning younger stands, they won't meet as much opposition.

"They chose to log in mature forests that are habitat for spotted owls and near streams and in potential wilderness areas," Heiken says. "And if they could decide not to do those things that would help a lot. So the EIS gives them a chance to get it right this time."

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Environmentalists urge APA delay in new rules on clearcutting

Environmentalists urge APA delay in new rules on clearcutting | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

New rules on potential clear-cutting of Adirondack forests are on the verge of being adopted by the Adirondack Park Agency, with environmental groups warning changes could fuel much more logging.


On Tuesday, an environmental coalition urged Gov. Andrew Cuomo to put the brakes on Thursday's planned vote by the park agency, while a spokesman for the timber industry said fears of rampant clear-cutting are unfounded.

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Under existing rules, the APA conducts an environmental review before its commissioners consider permits to clear-cut 25 acres or more. Permits are rare, with only three sought and then issued in the last two decades.


Under the changes, which could affect hundreds of thousand of acres of privately owned forests, logging permits for clear-cuts of any size would be granted routinely to forest owners whose property was certified as environmentally sustainable by either of two outside not-for-profit groups — the Forest Stewardship Council or the Sustainable Forest Initiative.


Existing requirements for public notice and comment prior to a permit being issued would be discontinued, and a vote by park commissioners would no longer be required before permits were issued.

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Opponents likened that to the APA outsourcing authority over logging in the Adirondacks to the two certification programs, while also leaving the public uninformed about potential clear-cuts until after logging had already started.

"Any debate over clear-cutting as a tool is not the point. It can do some good in some habitats," said Dan Plumley, a partner with Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve, a Niskayuna-based environmental group. "The point is public transparency and maintaining the authority and role of the park agency. People want to know that the agency is still watching."

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Keith McKeever, a spokesman for the park agency, said changes would give loggers a "greater sense of predictability" and encourage more property owners to join two certification program that have "the highest forestry standards in the world." He said the changes would mean "healthier forests and longer-term investments in the region's forest product industry."

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Haley Abrams's comment, April 13, 2014 2:44 AM
I agree with Ann Marie that this article show
Haley Abrams's comment, April 13, 2014 2:44 AM
I agree that this a
Haley Abrams's comment, April 13, 2014 2:48 AM
I agree with Ann Marie on how this article shows the struggles that the government faces with outside groups. These struggles are an important of our government so that one group does not gain so much power. And these struggles will hopefully allow that best discussions to be made.
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A Supremely Important Decision About America's Logging Industry

A Supremely Important Decision About America's Logging Industry | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it
On December 3, the U.S. Supreme Court will consider who is best suited to set national environmental policy – the experienced scientists and regulators at the Environmental Protection Agency or activist trial lawyers.

Northwest Environmental Defense Center (also known as Decker v. NEDC) the justices will review a 2011 Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals decision that overturned 35 years of EPA Clean Water Act regulation of the logging industry, the source of 2.5 million American jobs. The high court will decide between two theories of regulation: (1) the law tells states (as the EPA insists) to regulate runoff from logging roads via “Best Management Practices” (which are flexible, federally supervised standards tailored to local conditions, that activists cannot challenge in court); or (2) the law requires (as the Ninth Circuit says) “point source” permits usually reserved for factories, mines and chemical plants, and subject to court challenges.

This arcane technical dispute has real-world consequences.

Under the Ninth Circuit ruling, a permit could be demanded for every drain and ditch that directs water from a logging road to a fish-bearing stream. The U.S. Forest Service estimates that getting all its roads fully certified could take as much as a decade. The state of Washington has said that, on average, it will need one permit per mile for all 55,000 miles of its eligible roads, with, by some estimates, the cost of processing a single permit running $2,800. And, unlike BMPs, permits will be subject to activists’ lawsuits. Senator Ron Wyden (D-Oregon) has warned that upholding the Ninth Circuit decision will “bury private, state and tribal forest lands in a wave of litigation.” More like a tsunami.
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Congress and Supreme Court Address Forest Road Regulations

Congress and Supreme Court Address Forest Road Regulations | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

The House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure held a hearing today on H.R. 2541, the Silviculture Regulatory Consistency Act, a bill that would prevent a decision made by the Ninth Circuit Court that requires forest roads to be permitted under the Clean Water Act’s (CWA) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. This decision, if it is allowed to go into effect, would cost from $420 million to $4 billion per year in the US South (Cubbage and Abt). In the Pacific Northwest, these costs would range from $654-$883 million per year (Forest Econ, Inc); and in Maine, the costs could total between $93-$177 million annually (Sewall).

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We lost everything to the Sacred Owl

We lost everything to the Sacred Owl | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

The Northwest Forest Plan (NWFP) was adopted in 1994 to “protect” the Sacred Owl. Nobody actually knew how many Sacred Owls existed at the time; nor did they know how many had existed in any previous period. Nobody had ever counted them. Instead, they created a model based on nesting habitat. Since Sacred Owls nest in “old growth,” and “old growth” was being reduced by logging, the model inferred that the Sacred Owl population must be declining also.


Based on this model, the powers that be concluded the Sacred Owl must be endangered. Since the Sacred Owl also requires younger stands and clearings for forage, the critical habitat designation was broadened to include most of the public forest lands in the Pacific Northwest. This opened the door for the environmental movement to litigate virtually any timber sale on public lands under the auspices of the Endangered Species Act.


Today, the environmentalists claim the Sacred Owl population is still declining at an alarming rate. So we must set aside even more land as “critical habitat,” sacrificing even more production, jobs, and communities. But, if the Sacred Owl population really is declining so rapidly, eighteen years after the NWFP was put into effect, then clearly the plan is not successful and should be scrapped. Why double down on a failed plan?

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Risk assessment skills can produce dividend for nature

Risk assessment skills can produce dividend for nature | Timberland Investment | Scoop.it

To promote this idea, WWF is working with the Global Canopy Programme, a UK non-governmental organisation, to pilot a multi-revenue forest finance mechanism in Acre, Brazil.


The project involves designing a forest-backed security, such as a bond, to raise capital for sustainable forest management that would be asset backed or asset linked.


The revenue generated from forest products could be used to pay securities holders’ interest and final principle.


Some of the capital raised will be invested locally in programmes promoting sustainable livelihoods and in conservation monitoring and enforcement.

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