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Rescooped by Francisco Javier from Geography Education
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Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map

Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map | TIC TAC PATXIGU NEWS | Scoop.it

"An earlier GeoCurrents post on Chechnya mentioned that the Chechens were deported from their homeland in the North Caucasus to Central Asia in February 1944.  However, the Chechen nation was not the only one to suffer such a fate under Stalin’s regime."


Via Seth Dixon
Francisco Javier 's insight:

Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 12, 2014 1:43 PM

The Soviet Union forced vast amounts of people and ethnic groups out of their historical homelands to settle new areas during the early and mid 20th century. Many of those forced into resettlement died, and today some consider it a genocide or crime against humanity. As ethnic groups were moved out, ethnic Russians were moved in to take their places, and explains why many places outside of Russia (Ukraine) have populations that still maintain strong Russian identities. It also explains why places like Chechnya have such a long history of insurgency and extremism against Russian authority and power.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:37 PM

This graph represents the areas where many of the Chechnes had been displaced to in the era of Stalins regime. Many of these people were displaced from their homes and forced to move. Many of them either had to leave family behind of they were forced to move together and had no initial home to live in.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 1:51 PM

i see this as history retelling itself. for some reason throughout history terrible men think that their race is better than another, this is not true and if a person wants to think this that is their prerogative, but some men think it to such an extent that they seek to eliminate the entire other people. nothing good can come of this and it turns into mass conflict every time. it destroys countries and breeds hate on all sides.

Rescooped by Francisco Javier from Geography Education
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The Names Behind The States

The Names Behind The States | TIC TAC PATXIGU NEWS | Scoop.it

An infographic of the etymology and cultural origins of the names that made the United States of America.


Via Seth Dixon
Francisco Javier 's insight:

The Names Behind The States | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

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Emily Ross Cook's curator insight, May 6, 2013 7:49 AM

Interesting how many Native American names we've used for states and cities.  I guess I thought there would be more English names!

Seth Dixon's comment, May 6, 2013 3:21 PM
@Carly, Texas is also inaccurate...
Aulde de Barbuat's comment, May 18, 2013 7:08 AM
quite interesting, thanks. Unhappily, the link seems broken..Do you happen to have another one?
Rescooped by Francisco Javier from Geography Education
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Kent State: Past and Present

Kent State: Past and Present | TIC TAC PATXIGU NEWS | Scoop.it

On May 4, 1970, the Ohio National Guard gunned down Jeffrey Miller, Allison Krause, William Knox Schroeder, and Sandra Scheuer during an anti-war protest at Kent State University.


Via Seth Dixon
Francisco Javier 's insight:

Kent State: Past and Present | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 5, 2013 2:08 PM

This is a poignant image that strikes a chord with me.  History is embedded within place even if the historical events are not memorialized within the landscape.  May 4, 2013 not only marked the anniversary of the Kent State tragedy, it also was the day that the great Wilbur Zelinsky passed away. He was a geographer who analyzed the cultural landscape as well as anyone ever did, and I consider myself fortunate enough to have had conversations with him while I was at Penn State. 

   

Tags: historicalwar, landscape.

Maegan Anderson's comment, May 7, 2013 12:37 AM
speechless...
Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, May 10, 2013 9:39 AM

Photos like this that juxtapose the original photograph to present day surroundings always grab me.  What an interesting discussion this could be in a history classroom!