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TIC TAC PATXIGU NEWS
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Understand These 10 Principles of Good Design Before You Start Your Next eLearning Project

Understand These 10 Principles of Good Design Before You Start Your Next eLearning Project | TIC TAC PATXIGU NEWS | Scoop.it
If you are a novice to eLearning, it is wise to know a few key principles about eLearning design.

Via Gust MEES
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Understand These 10 Principles of Good Design Before You Start Your Next eLearning Project | @scoopit via @knolinfos http://sco.lt/...

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Critical Thinking

Critical Thinking | TIC TAC PATXIGU NEWS | Scoop.it
I am interested in this post and post on critical thinking. Is critical thinking a skill?  Can one teach critical thinking? Stephen has delivered the course on Critical Literacies MOOC in the past....

 

Robert H. Ennis, Author of The Cornell Critical Thinking Tests
“Critical thinking is reasonable, reflective thinking that is focused on deciding what to believe and do.”

 

Assuming that critical thinking is reasonable reflective thinking focused on deciding what to believe or do, a critical thinker:

 

1. Is open-minded and mindful of alternatives
2. Tries to be well-informed
3. Judges well the credibility of sources
4. Identifies conclusions, reasons, and assumptions
5. Judges well the quality of an argument, including the acceptability of its reasons, assumptions, and evidence
6. Can well develop and defend a reasonable position
7. Asks appropriate clarifying questions
8. Formulates plausible hypotheses; plans experiments well
9. Defines terms in a way appropriate for the context
10. Draws conclusions when warranted, but with caution
11. Integrates all items in this list when deciding what to believe or do

 

What are the principles of critical thinking?

 

- Knowledge is acquired only through thinking, reasoning, and questioning. Knowledge is based on facts.


- It is only from learning how to think that you learn what to think.


- Critical thinking is an organized and systematic process used to judge the effectiveness of an argument.


- Critical thinking is a search for meaning.


- Critical thinking is a skill that can be learned.


- Do the above principles hold true and won’t change from one domain to the next?

 

Read more, very interesting:

http://suifaijohnmak.wordpress.com/2012/09/16/critical-thinking-2/

 


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Gust MEES, Paul
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David Luigi FUSCHI's comment, April 9, 2013 12:21 AM
Are we sure that Critical Thinking is really appreciated as it should? In my personal experience critical thinker are often opposed if not hunted. Deciding to be a critical thinker may have a high price especially in certain context like industry or management. Definitely it brings better results and can easily foster innovation, but it is hated by man of power and yes-men. I pride myself of constantly trying to be a critical thinker and most of all to be critical of myself and my actions, but I have to say that this has taken me quite a toll in my life, yet I do not regret it. Sorry for stepping in, I do hope this two-penny thought could help in sparkle some discussion on how to foster critical thinking.
Ajo Monzó's comment, April 9, 2013 12:32 AM
Hello David, I agree with you, to be a critical thinker sometimes can be even dangerous, buttheyare the people who move the world...thanks a lot for your comment!
Monica Gutiérrez's curator insight, March 4, 9:54 AM

#criticalthinking 

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TileMill | Fast and beautiful maps

TileMill | Fast and beautiful maps | TIC TAC PATXIGU NEWS | Scoop.it

 

Design beautiful maps...

 

Make beautiful interactive maps


Whether you're a journalist, web designer, researcher, or seasoned cartographer, TileMill is the design studio you need to create stunning interactive maps.

 

TileMill is an open source project by MapBox...

 

Read more:

http://mapbox.com/tilemill/

 


Via Gust MEES, Paul
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Create your own map, build interactive maps, place photos, videos on a map

Create your own map, build interactive maps, place photos, videos on a map | TIC TAC PATXIGU NEWS | Scoop.it

Use ZeeMaps to create,
make, and publish interactive, customized maps.
Make a map of places you have visited, your customers, friends, or relatives.


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, vidistar, mobile learning hub, Gust MEES, Paul
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Teachers Guide to The Use of Twitter in Classroom

Teachers Guide to The Use of Twitter in Classroom | TIC TAC PATXIGU NEWS | Scoop.it

 

As you know Twitter has made such a big jump from just a social network where people get to share their mundane activities to a rigorous learning and teaching activitiy. The potential of Twitter is even way bigger than we might think and I personally depend a lot on it for my professional development. Anyway, to bring you closer to how you can leverage this social media tool in your classroom and to help you learn more about the essentials of 'educational tweeting' I would recommend that you have a look at the guide below .

 

Read more:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2012/09/teachers-guide-to-use-of-twitter-in.html

 


Via Gust MEES, Paul
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Research: WHY SMART PEOPLE ARE STUPID

Research: WHY SMART PEOPLE ARE STUPID | TIC TAC PATXIGU NEWS | Scoop.it
Editors’ Note: The introductory paragraphs of this post appeared in similar form in an October, 2011, column by Jonah Lehrer for the Wall Street Journal. We regret the duplication of material. Here’s a simple arithmetic question: A bat and ball...

 

Read more:

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/frontal-cortex/2012/06/daniel-kahneman-bias-studies.html

 


Via Gust MEES
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