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this curious life
Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind. - Dr. Seuss
Curated by Janet Devlin
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Rabid: A Cultural History of the World’s Most Diabolical Virus

Rabid: A Cultural History of the World’s Most Diabolical Virus | this curious life | Scoop.it
How a tiny cluster of genes and proteins gave rise to zombie and vampire mythology.

 

'Such is the paralyzing fear of rabies, in fact, that when Louis Pasteur was developing the very vaccine to fight the menace and had to extract the virus from the jaws of madly growling infected dogs, he and his two collaborators kept a loaded gun ready — not just for the dog, but for any researcher who got bitten and infected.'

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Six Famous Thought Experiments, Animated in 60 Seconds Each

Six Famous Thought Experiments, Animated in 60 Seconds Each | this curious life | Scoop.it
From Ancient Greece to quantum mechanics, or what a Chinese room and a cat have to do with infinity.
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Very Rare Air Raid Atari Cartridge Found - Mental Floss

Very Rare Air Raid Atari Cartridge Found - Mental Floss | this curious life | Scoop.it
Very Rare Air Raid Atari Cartridge Found...

 

Seriously??????

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Home Dealbreakers: The 10 Things In A Guy's House That Turn Us Off

Home Dealbreakers: The 10 Things In A Guy's House That Turn Us Off | this curious life | Scoop.it
Getting to see where your guy lives is one of the most exciting parts of a relationship. After all, you can tell so much about him by visiting his house: what he likes to eat, the music he listens to and the movies he watches.
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"Talking" Whale Could Imitate Human Voice

"Talking" Whale Could Imitate Human Voice | this curious life | Scoop.it
Birds aren't the only animals that impersonate people—a captive beluga whale learned to mimic humans, a new study suggests. Listen for yourself.
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Evolution of new genes captured

Evolution of new genes captured | this curious life | Scoop.it
Like job-seekers searching for a new position, living things sometimes have to pick up a new skill if they are going to succeed. Researchers have shown for the first time how living organisms do this.
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Richard Feynman on the Role of Scientific Culture in Modern Society

Richard Feynman on the Role of Scientific Culture in Modern Society | this curious life | Scoop.it
In order to make progress, one must leave the door to the unknown ajar – ajar only.
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Sperm Tracked in 3-D—A First

Sperm Tracked in 3-D—A First | this curious life | Scoop.it
For the first time, scientists have successfully plotted the paths of sperm in 3-D, revealing corkscrew-like trajectories and "hyperactive" swimmers.
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How Will You Measure Your Life?

How Will You Measure Your Life? | this curious life | Scoop.it

This is the most-read article in Harvard Business Review’s history and led to the best-selling book of the same name.  It was written by Clayton M. Christensen (cchristensen@hbs.edu), the Kim B. Clark Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School. Professor Christenden wrote this for an end of school graduation for his students followinga serious health crisis, including a cancer-related stroke which, among other things, left him having to learn to speak again.  Reflecting on this experience and drawing upon the best practice business models he had successfully employed and taught he came to paradoxically simple yet profound conclusions about living meaningful lives.

 

Below is my interpretation of the main points made by the author.

 

'Management can be the most noble of professions if it’s practiced well.'  However, in order to be sure we find happiness in our careers and our lives we need to recognise that the most powerful motivator in our lives isn’t money.  Rather, it’s the opportunity to find meaning and purpose - to learn, grow in responsibilities, contribute to others, and be recognized for our achievements.

 

Having a clear purpose in life is essential to happiness and a work-life balance, so it is important to keep the purpose of our lives 'front and centre' when deciding how to spend our time, talents, and energy.  

 

Decisions about allocating personal time, energy and talent ultimately shape our life strategy.

 

Intimate and loving relationships with family and friends are the most powerful and enduring sources of happiness.

 

These processes will be enhanced by creating a harmonious and cooperative culture. In order to achieve this we need to ensure that we have the right 'tools' in terms of skills, knowledge and experience.

 

Avoid the'Marginal Costs Mistake': immoral or unethical behaviour based upon the 'just this once' premise may have short term (marginal costs) benefits, but this lack of integrity will be at the expense of long term goals.  

 

Entertain a 'humble' acknowledgement that it is possible to learn something from everybody and your learning opportunities will be unlimited.

 

Think about the measure by which you will judge your life and make a resolution to live every day in that context so that your life is successful because it is productive and meaningful.

 

 

 

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Valley Fever on the Rise in U.S. Southwest, with Links to Climate Change: Scientific American

Valley Fever on the Rise in U.S. Southwest, with Links to Climate Change: Scientific American | this curious life | Scoop.it
Heat waves exacerbated by climate change may be helping kick up the dust responsible for the fungal disease in humans...
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Meme: An Experiment With a Tadpole's Development

Meme: An Experiment With a Tadpole's Development | this curious life | Scoop.it
Taking a piece of skin from the belly and switching it with a piece from the back caused the frog to scratch its belly when you tickle its back.

 

'What Sperry was demonstrating here was evidence of what has become known as the Chemoaffinity hypothesis. When the axons (the ‘wires’ of the nerve cells) are developing they are predetermined by their genes to seek out specific cells by attaching to a particular chemical signature. So when Sperry switched the location of the back and belly skin cells the axons still found the tissue they were intended to find. Hence, the tickling of the switched around areas fooled the frog into believing the irritation was at another location of its body.'

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Top BitTorrent Countries In The World, Top Torrent Towns In The UK | TorrentFreak

Top BitTorrent Countries In The World, Top Torrent Towns In The UK | TorrentFreak | this curious life | Scoop.it
A new report reveals that when it comes to worldwide unauthorized BitTorrent downloads, users in the United States are the most prolific, followed by those in the UK, Italy and Canada.
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What Makes Pi So Special?

What Makes Pi So Special? | this curious life | Scoop.it
Pi appears all over math and nature, not just in circles. Here's why.

 

'Defined as the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter, pi, or in symbol form, π, seems a simple enough concept. But it turns out to be an "irrational number," meaning its exact value is inherently unknowable.'

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Action Philosophers: Two Millennia of Philosophy in Comic Form

Action Philosophers: Two Millennia of Philosophy in Comic Form | this curious life | Scoop.it
John Stuart Mill meets Peanuts, or how to handle mummies like Carl Jung.
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One-Minute Animated Primers on Major Theories of Religion

One-Minute Animated Primers on Major Theories of Religion | this curious life | Scoop.it
From Karl Marx to Richard Dawkins in 60 seconds.
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Home Deal Breakers: The 10 Things In A Girl's House That Turn Men Off

Home Deal Breakers: The 10 Things In A Girl's House That Turn Men Off | this curious life | Scoop.it
We recently put together a list of our biggest turnoffs found in a guy’s apartment. And let us tell you, the men weren’t happy.
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Global Climate Action Map

Global Climate Action Map | this curious life | Scoop.it
So what countries are taking action on climate change? A new, interactive map by The Climate Institute shows who's doing what.

 

'So which countries are acting on climate change? And how does it compare to what were doing here in Australia?


The Climate Institute has just launched a new, interactive map that enables users to track and compare country actions. Check it out & spread the word!'


http://globalclimateactionmap.climateinstitute.org.au/

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Are California's Pot Farms Bad for the Planet?

Are California's Pot Farms Bad for the Planet? | this curious life | Scoop.it
County officials say marijuana growers are wreaking havoc on the land—but they could go to jail for regulating the farms.
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Cory Bernardi is right, in Peter Singer’s anti-human world

Cory Bernardi is right, in Peter Singer’s anti-human world | this curious life | Scoop.it
Senator Cory Bernardi has been reviled for associating homosexuality with something repugnant, bestiality.
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Genetic mutation may have allowed early humans to migrate throughout Africa

Genetic mutation may have allowed early humans to migrate throughout Africa | this curious life | Scoop.it
A genetic mutation that occurred thousands of years ago might be the answer to how early humans were able to move from central Africa and across the continent in what has been called "the great expansion," according to new research.
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Skin cancer detection breakthrough

Skin cancer detection breakthrough | this curious life | Scoop.it
Researchers at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital have pinpointed when seemingly innocuous skin pigment cells mutate into melanoma.

 

'Because cancer is traditionally regarded as a genetic disease involving permanent defects that directly affect the DNA sequence, this new finding of a potentially reversible abnormality that surrounds the DNA (thus termed “epigenetic”) is a hot topic in cancer research, according to the researchers.'

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Best practices writ large

Best practices writ large | this curious life | Scoop.it

 

After suffering a stroke, Harvard Business School Professor Clayton Christensen, who had built a career by 'telling business leaders not what to think, but how to think about running their companies, had to learn to speak again and wrote a deeply personal book about life. “How Will You Measure Your Life?”

 

'[This book] takes on life’s big questions — how to balance work and home life, how to maintain a marriage and raise children, how to adhere to ethical and moral standards — using the rigorous framework of the business models Christensen has developed over two decades.'

 

 

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Which Is Greater, The Number Of Sand Grains On Earth Or Stars In The Sky? : NPR

Which Is Greater, The Number Of Sand Grains On Earth Or Stars In The Sky?  : NPR | this curious life | Scoop.it
Scientists have estimated the answer to this age-old question. However, the vastness of these big, big numbers can be limited by our human perspective.
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The rich are different — and not in a good way, studies suggest

The rich are different — and not in a good way, studies suggest | this curious life | Scoop.it
Psychologist and social scientist Dacher Keltner says his research shows the rich really are different: Their life experience makes them less empathetic, less altruistic, and generally more selfish.

 

'“We have now done 12 separate studies measuring empathy in every way imaginable, social behavior in every way, and some work on compassion and it’s the same story,” he said. “Lower class people just show more empathy, more prosocial behavior, more compassion, no matter how you look at it.”

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BBC One - Panorama, Trouble on the Estate

BBC One - Panorama, Trouble on the Estate | this curious life | Scoop.it
Panorama visits a housing estate in Blackburn, learning what it is like to live there.
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