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The Conscious Lifestyle: A Leader Must Look and Listen and Know How to Resolve Conflicts (Part 2)

The Conscious Lifestyle: A Leader Must Look and Listen and Know How to Resolve Conflicts (Part 2) | this curious life | Scoop.it
If you examine the rise of a typical leader, the ability to look and listen decreases as power increases. That's a trend you need to be aware of. At the outset, a future leader often rises out of a
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this curious life
Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind. - Dr. Seuss
Curated by Janet Devlin
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Expert Panel on Diet: Forget Cholesterol, but Cut Sugar

Expert Panel on Diet: Forget Cholesterol, but Cut Sugar | this curious life | Scoop.it
Twists on current standard dietary recommendations so far include a green light to moderate caffeine consumption and abandonment of formal upper limits on dietary cholesterol intake.
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Viruses In Our Genome: Forty Million Years In the Making

Viruses In Our Genome: Forty Million Years In the Making | this curious life | Scoop.it

Each year, billions of people get infected with viruses–with common ones like influenza and cold viruses, and rarer ones like polio and Ebola. The viruses don’t stay all that long inside of us. In most cases, our immune systems wipe them out, except for a few refugees that manage to escape to a new host and keep their species alive. In some cases, the viruses kill their unfortunate hosts, and end their own existence as well. But in some exquisitely rare cases, viruses meld with the genome of their hosts and become part of the genetic legacy their hosts pass down to future generations.


Scientists know this melding has happened because viruses have distinctive genes. When scientists scan the human genome, they sometimes come across a stretch of DNA that bears the hallmarks of viruses. The easiest type of virus to recognize are retroviruses, a group that includes HIV. Retroviruses make copies of themselves by infecting cells and then using an enzyme to insert their genes into their host cell’s DNA. The cell then reads the inserted DNA and makes new molecules that assemble into new viruses.


Humans carry about 100,000 pieces of DNA that came from retroviruses–known as endogenous retroviruses. All told, they come to an estimated 5 to 8 percent of the entire human genome. That’s several times more DNA that makes up all 20,000 of our protein-coding genes.


Gkikas Magiorkinis, a University of Oxford virologist, and his colleagues have now carried out large-scale survey of endogenous retroviruses in humans, apes, and Old World monkeys–a group of species that all descend from a common primate ancestor that lived some 40 million years ago. They catalogued the viruses in each species and compared them to the versions in the other primates. They were able to reconstruct the history of our viral DNA in unprecedented detail, even coming up with estimates for the rate at which the viruses inserted new copies into our genome.


The scientists can trace our viral DNA to 30 to 35 separate invasions. Once each virus established itself in our ancestors’ DNA, it produced copies of itself scattered through the genome. The rate at which new copies were inserted rose and fell over time, and at different rates in different branches of the primate tree. Here’s an overall look at the history of the viruses. 


Our monkey-like ancestors 40 million years ago acquired new virus copies at a fast clip–much faster than in our own lineage in the past couple million years. One virus in particular, known as HERV-H, was responsible for most of the new copies. It may have evolved adaptations that made it into a superspreader inside the genome.


In the past million years, only a single virus has continued to multiply–known as HERV-K. Today, you can find some HERV-K copies in some people and not in others. The pattern of these copies suggests that as recently as 250,000 years ago, HERV-K was still making new copies.


It’s possible that HERV-K is completely dead now. There’s no evidence that HERV-K or any other endogenous retrovirus is actively spreading or causing cancer. It’s hard to say at this point why humans have put the brakes on endogenous retroviruses. But Magiorkinis has one suggestion: our ancestors may have reduced their odds of picking up new viruses.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Insane Story Of A Man Who Was Born A Dwarf And Died A Giant

The Insane Story Of A Man Who Was Born A Dwarf And Died A Giant | this curious life | Scoop.it
The only man like this in history.
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Survival Retreat Consulting - Your Best Choice For The American Redoubt

Survival Retreat Consulting - Your Best Choice For The American Redoubt | this curious life | Scoop.it
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Mysterious Afro-funk legend to be honoured in Sydney

Mysterious Afro-funk legend to be honoured in Sydney | this curious life | Scoop.it
William Onyeabor, a mysterious born-again Christian whose music thrills and baffles, will be honoured at the Sydney Festival.
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Answer to Waltzing Matilda mystery found in Broome

Answer to Waltzing Matilda mystery found in Broome | this curious life | Scoop.it
A mystery in Australia's musical history has been solved with the first recorded singer of Waltzing Matilda tracked to the Kimberley town of Broome.
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Silent, not deadly; how farts cure diseases | Dean Burnett

Silent, not deadly; how farts cure diseases | Dean Burnett | this curious life | Scoop.it
Dean Burnett: Reports of scientists claiming farts cure diseases may be misleading, but if accurate this would have far-reaching consequences
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Why Muslims Love Jesus Too

Why Muslims Love Jesus Too | this curious life | Scoop.it
The virgin birth is mentioned in the...what...gasp...Koran?! It is indeed. So have yourself a merry Muslim Christmas.
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Wendell Berry on Solitude and Why Pride and Despair Are the Two Great Enemies of Creative Work

Wendell Berry on Solitude and Why Pride and Despair Are the Two Great Enemies of Creative Work | this curious life | Scoop.it
"True solitude is found in the wild places, where one is without human obligation. One’s inner voices become audible... In consequence, on
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Chernobyl’s eerie desolation revealed by camera mounted on drone

Chernobyl’s eerie desolation revealed by camera mounted on drone | this curious life | Scoop.it
British documentary maker Danny Cooke’s video Postcards from Pripyat, is first time area has been filmed from the air
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Cyclone Tracy transitions: See how Darwin has been rebuilt 40 years after the devastation - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Cyclone Tracy transitions: See how Darwin has been rebuilt 40 years after the devastation - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | this curious life | Scoop.it
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You won't believe what this stray dog did after being fed a meatball

You won't believe what this stray dog did after being fed a meatball | this curious life | Scoop.it
Scruffy but adorable Arthur refused to leave after being fed a meatball, and found himself climbing hills and wading through mud, forming an unbreakable bond
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Waiting for the sea

Waiting for the sea | this curious life | Scoop.it
It took just 40 years for the Aral Sea to dry up. Fishing ports suddenly found themselves in a desert.
But in one small part of the sea, water is returning.
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20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities

20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities | this curious life | Scoop.it

NOTE: To subscribe to the RSS feed of Amazing Science, copy http://www.scoop.it/t/amazing-science/rss.xml into the URL field of your browser and click "subscribe".

 

This newsletter is aggregated from over 1450 news sources:

http://www.genautica.com/links/1450_news_sources.html

 

All my Tweets and Scoop.It! posts sorted and searchable:

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You can search through all the articles semantically on my

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NOTE: All articles in the amazing-science newsletter can also be sorted by topic. To do so, click the FIND buntton (symbolized by the FUNNEL on the top right of the screen)  and display all the relevant postings SORTED by TOPICS.

 

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Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Siegfried Holle's curator insight, July 4, 2014 8:45 AM

Your knowledge is your strength and power 

Saberes Sin Fronteras Ong's curator insight, November 30, 2014 5:33 PM

Acceso gratuito a documentos de las mejores universidades del mundo

♥ princess leia ♥'s curator insight, December 28, 2014 11:58 AM

WoW  .. Expand  your mind!! It has room to grow!!! 

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Scientology group offers anti-drug help to city schools

Scientology group offers anti-drug help to city schools | this curious life | Scoop.it
A Scientology group is offering anti-drug services to city schools and some parents are not pleased.
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Philosophy is for posh, white boys with trust funds' – why are there so few women?

Philosophy is for posh, white boys with trust funds' – why are there so few women? | this curious life | Scoop.it
Over 70% of philosophers in UK universities are men. We speak to academics about how institutions can become more inclusive
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A Vintage Illustrated Love Letter to Books: What They Are, How They’re Made, and Why They Matter to Us

A Vintage Illustrated Love Letter to Books: What They Are, How They’re Made, and Why They Matter to Us | this curious life | Scoop.it
"There is a reason for nearly everything."

Zen monks in 12th-century China bemoaned books as a perilous distraction to be avoided at all
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2015 could be 'year of terrorism', expert says

2015 could be 'year of terrorism', expert says | this curious life | Scoop.it
Governments and security agencies around the world are struggling to contain violent extremism and need to invest more money to stop terrorist attacks, according to a leading Australian terrorism expert.
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RN's top 10 articles of 2014

RN's top 10 articles of 2014 | this curious life | Scoop.it
From World War One to penguin saving dogs, child psychopaths, sexism in China, and why our power bills keep rising, these are RN's 10 most popular articles of 2014. Did you miss any?
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What Actually Happens When You Click On Those 'One Weird Trick' Ads

What Actually Happens When You Click On Those 'One Weird Trick' Ads | this curious life | Scoop.it
"Prepare to be shocked!"
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Meet the Dogged Researchers Who Try to Unmask Haters Online | MIT Technology Review

Meet the Dogged Researchers Who Try to Unmask Haters Online | MIT Technology Review | this curious life | Scoop.it
A group of journalists and researchers wade into ugly corners of the Internet to expose racists, creeps, and hypocrites. Have they gone too far?
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This Physicist Has A Groundbreaking Idea About Why Life Exists

This Physicist Has A Groundbreaking Idea About Why Life Exists | this curious life | Scoop.it
It could liberate biologists from relying too much on a Darwinian explanation.
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Eight beneficial introduced species in South Australia

Eight beneficial introduced species in South Australia | this curious life | Scoop.it
Take a look at eight introduced species which have not harmed, or have even been helpful, in South Australia.
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Ancient dental plaque: A 'Whey' into our milk drinking past?

Ancient dental plaque: A 'Whey' into our milk drinking past? | this curious life | Scoop.it
We drink milk because it is good for us, but we rarely stop to think "Why?
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