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Lonesome George Not the Last of His Kind, After All?

Lonesome George Not the Last of His Kind, After All? | this curious life | Scoop.it
Maybe the late, lamented Galápagos tortoise wasn't the end of his line, after all. A DNA shocker is spurring a hunt for living cousins.

 

'Now, in an area known as Volcano Wolf—on the secluded northern tip of Isabela, another Galápagos island—the researchers have identified 17 hybrid descendants of C.n. abingdoni within a population of 1,667 tortoises.

 

Genetic testing identified three males, nine females, and five juveniles (under the age of 20) with DNA from C.n. abingdoni. The presence of juveniles suggests that purebred specimens may exist on the island too, the researchers said.

 

"Even the parents of some of the older individuals may still be alive today, given that tortoises live for so long and that we detected high levels of ancestry in a few of these hybrids," Yale evolutionary biologist Danielle Edwards said.'

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this curious life
Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind. - Dr. Seuss
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Patients with eating disorders have increased risk of autoimmune diseases

Patients with eating disorders have increased risk of autoimmune diseases | this curious life | Scoop.it
An association between eating disorders and several autoimmune diseases has been observed in people with different genetic backgrounds. These findings support the link between immune-mediated mechanisms and development of eating disorders.
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Monsanto weed killer can 'probably' cause cancer: World Health Organization

CHICAGO (Reuters) - The world's most widely-used weed killer can probably cause cancer, the World Health Organization said on Friday.The WHO's cancer arm, the International Agency for Research on Cancer
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The truth about child soldiers - CNN.com

The truth about child soldiers - CNN.com | this curious life | Scoop.it
Images from an ISIS video appearing to show a child executing a hostage were horrific. But ISIS is far from the only group to use children as soldiers.
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EU Task Force to deal with anti-Semitism - J-Wire

The B’nai Brith Anti-Defamation Commission (ADC) has welcomed the call for the establishment of a European Union task force on anti-Semitism.
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Food Additives Alter Gut Microbes, Cause Diseases in Mice - NIH Research Matters - National Institutes of Health (NIH)

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World's Largest Tree Of Life Visualizes 50,000 Species Across Time

World's Largest Tree Of Life Visualizes 50,000 Species Across Time | this curious life | Scoop.it
The circle of life meets family tree.
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Monty Python Will Celebrate 40 Years of 'Holy Grail' at Tribeca Film Fest

Monty Python Will Celebrate 40 Years of 'Holy Grail' at Tribeca Film Fest | this curious life | Scoop.it
New Python doc will complement special 'Grail' screening with all five surviving members
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Chameleon's colour magic revealed

Chameleon's colour magic revealed | this curious life | Scoop.it
Humans have long been fascinated by chameleons changing colour to dazzle mates, scare rivals and confuse predators, now scientists have uncovered the mechanism behind the feat.
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New nanodevice defeats drug resistance and releases cancer drugs

New nanodevice defeats drug resistance and releases cancer drugs | this curious life | Scoop.it

Chemotherapy often shrinks tumors at first, but as cancer cells become resistant to drug treatment, tumors can grow back. A new nanodevice developed by MIT researchers can help overcome that by first blocking the gene that confers drug resistance, then launching a new chemotherapy attack against the disarmed tumors. The device, which consists of gold nanoparticles embedded in a hydrogel that can be injected or implanted at a tumor site, could also be used more broadly to disrupt any gene involved in cancer.

 

“You can target any genetic marker and deliver a drug, including those that don’t necessarily involve drug-resistance pathways. It’s a universal platform for dual therapy,” says Natalie Artzi, a research scientist at MIT’s Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES), an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School, and senior author of a paper describing the device in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences the week of March 2, 2015.

 

To demonstrate the effectiveness of the new approach, Artzi and colleagues tested it in mice implanted with a type of human breast tumor known as a triple negative tumor. Such tumors, which lack any of the three most common breast cancer markers — estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and Her2 — are usually very difficult to treat. Using the new device to block the gene for multidrug resistant protein 1 (MRP1) and then deliver the chemotherapy drug 5-fluorouracil, the researchers were able to shrink tumors by 90 percent in two weeks.

 

MRP1 is one of many genes that can help tumor cells become resistant to chemotherapy. MRP1 codes for a protein that acts as a pump, eliminating cancer drugs from tumor cells and rendering them ineffective. This pump acts on several drugs other than 5-fluorouracil, including the commonly used cancer drug doxorubicin. “Drug resistance is a huge hurdle in cancer therapy and the reason why chemotherapy, in many cases, is not very effective”, says João Conde, an IMES postdoc and lead author of the PNAS paper. To overcome this, the researchers created gold nanoparticles coated with strands of DNA complementary to the sequence of MRP1 messenger RNA — the snippet of genetic material that carries DNA’s instructions to the rest of the cell.

 

These strands of DNA, which the researchers call “nanobeacons,” fold back on themselves to form a closed hairpin structure. However, when the DNA encounters the correct mRNA sequence inside a cancer cell, it unfolds and binds to the mRNA, preventing it from generating more molecules of the MRP1 protein. As the DNA unfolds, it also releases molecules of 5-fluorouracil that were embedded in the strand. This drug then attacks the tumor cell’s DNA, since MRP1 is no longer around to pump it out of the cell. “When we silence the gene, the cell is no longer resistant to that drug, so we can deliver the drug that now regains its efficacy,” Conde says.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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This is what the photographer has to say about this pretty incredible picture

This is what the photographer has to say about this pretty incredible picture | this curious life | Scoop.it
You've almost certainly seen this crop up in your Twitter feed more than once.
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Origins of AIDS virus strains traced

Origins of AIDS virus strains traced | this curious life | Scoop.it
TWO of four strains of the virus that can cause AIDS come from gorillas in south-western Cameroon, an international team of scientists report in studies published in the US.
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Expert Panel on Diet: Forget Cholesterol, but Cut Sugar

Expert Panel on Diet: Forget Cholesterol, but Cut Sugar | this curious life | Scoop.it
Twists on current standard dietary recommendations so far include a green light to moderate caffeine consumption and abandonment of formal upper limits on dietary cholesterol intake.
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New link between neurodegenerative diseases, abnormal immune responses found

New link between neurodegenerative diseases, abnormal immune responses found | this curious life | Scoop.it
New insight into the link between neurodegenerative disorders and inflammation has been gained by a new study that provides a framework to explore more fully the possibility that viral infection may lead to onset of these diseases.
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Measuring the intangible: Impact of culture on health - The OBSSR Connector

Measuring the intangible: Impact of culture on health - The OBSSR Connector | this curious life | Scoop.it
An OppNet conference on Methodological Approaches to Measure Culture focuses on the impact of culture on health.
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Super PAC Men: How Political Consultants Took a Texas Oilman on a Wild Ride

Super PAC Men: How Political Consultants Took a Texas Oilman on a Wild Ride | this curious life | Scoop.it
The head of a Texas oil dynasty joined the parade of wealthy political donors, aiming to flip the Senate to Republicans. By the time consultants were done with him, the war chest was drained and fraud allegations were flying.
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‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’ and America’s Long, Weird Love Affair With Cults

‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’ and America’s Long, Weird Love Affair With Cults | this curious life | Scoop.it
Tina Fey’s new Netflix series channels the complicated history of cults in America.
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Dishwashers scrub off allergy protection

Dishwashers scrub off allergy protection | this curious life | Scoop.it
Using a dishwasher may increase the risk of allergic conditions in children by preventing microbial immune priming, Swedish research suggests.
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Nanomaterials - Fortune

Nanomaterials - Fortune | this curious life | Scoop.it
Nanoparticles touch nearly every Fortune 500 company and aspect of our lives. They’re in everything from snack foods to clothing to sunscreen. There’s just one problem: We know very little about what happens when they pile up in the environment—or inside us.
Janet Devlin's insight:

Like respiratory disease in 18th Century industrial revolution mill and textile workers, the many risks to miners that continue to this day, the devastation wrought by exposure to asbestos in many ways and the unknown quantity that is GMO, nanotechnology has enabled some remarkable feats, especially in medicine, but we are at the very early stage of determining the risks that are associated with nanomaterials.

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Cruising's dirty secret

Cruising's dirty secret | this curious life | Scoop.it
Cruise liners berthed near homes on Sydney harbour are burning a carcinogenic fuel banned in US and European ports. Residents say they’re getting sick but the cruise companies have refused to burn cleaner fuel and the government says it won’t act to stop the dirty ships for at least another year. Anne Connolly investigates.
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Getting plucked: the history of hair removal

Getting plucked: the history of hair removal | this curious life | Scoop.it
In her lifetime, the average woman will spend thousands of dollars on hair removal, while in the US 60 per cent of men regularly remove body hair. Yet, according to author Rebecca Herzig, in terms of western history, this trend is very new. Gail Boserio reports.
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20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities

20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities | this curious life | Scoop.it

NOTE: To subscribe to the RSS feed of Amazing Science, copy http://www.scoop.it/t/amazing-science/rss.xml into the URL field of your browser and click "subscribe".

 

This newsletter is aggregated from over 1450 news sources:

http://www.genautica.com/links/1450_news_sources.html

 

All my Tweets and Scoop.It! posts sorted and searchable:

http://www.genautica.com/tweets/index.html

 

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NOTE: All articles in the amazing-science newsletter can also be sorted by topic. To do so, click the FIND buntton (symbolized by the FUNNEL on the top right of the screen)  and display all the relevant postings SORTED by TOPICS.

 

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Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Siegfried Holle's curator insight, July 4, 2014 8:45 AM

Your knowledge is your strength and power 

Saberes Sin Fronteras Ong's curator insight, November 30, 2014 5:33 PM

Acceso gratuito a documentos de las mejores universidades del mundo

♥ princess leia ♥'s curator insight, December 28, 2014 11:58 AM

WoW  .. Expand  your mind!! It has room to grow!!! 

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Dolphins ‘deliberately get high’ on puffer fish nerve toxins by carefully chewing and passing them around

Dolphins ‘deliberately get high’ on puffer fish nerve toxins by carefully chewing and passing them around | this curious life | Scoop.it
Dolphins are thought of as one of the most intelligent species in the animal kingdom – and experts believe they have put their ingenuity to use in the pursuit of getting “high”.
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The lynx is returning to Britain after 1,300 years

The lynx is returning to Britain after 1,300 years | this curious life | Scoop.it
Lynx are to be reintroduced into the wild in Britain after a 1,300-year absence, under an ambitious “rewilding” plan drawn up by a conservation charity.
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