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We Need Social Producers: Catalysts for Conversations, Info & ROI

We Need Social Producers: Catalysts for Conversations, Info & ROI | this curious life | Scoop.it

This piece came to me from my fellow curator Jan Gordon. She is an EXCELLENT curator and if you follow her curation it will help your business a lot.

What I really like about this piece is its basic question -- are you sharing your biz stories for messaging or for engagement? These are two very different activities and will generate different results for your business.

Read Jan's excellent review below, read Brian Solis' article, and start shifting your storytelling so you can achieve better business results!


This wonderful piece was written by Brian Solis and as always, he captured the essence of what's needed to move your content to the next level, where your audience becomes an active participant. This is where relationships and communities are built, brand advocates, word of mouth and commerce follows if this is done right.

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

Social Producers are the new storytellers

 

**To thrive in social, mobile and new media in general, we need much more than content producers, we need a new breed of designers that grasp the elements of online sharing and have mastered the ART of social media

 

**They know how to  trigger desirable (and social) actions, reactions and transactions

 

**A new genre of social producers are taking aim at developing content strategies that are not only consumable, they're shareable, actionable and act as catalysts or sparks for relevant conversations.

 

**These social producers are in fact masters of their domains and understand the culture and the laws of information commerce within each

 

The difference between Social Producers and traditional content creators is they begin with social outcomes

 

**they understand the relationship between cause and effect and they bake-in conversation starters related to an integrated and business-focused strategy

 

**Social producers think about the overall experience and the effect where a social object is at the center of the dialogue and interaction they envision....within each network

 

**The overall story and outcome defines the nature of the social object.

 

Takeaway

 

**Beyond shareability, the social producers also think about resonance. Conversations on social networks move quickly.

 

**What was trending an hour ago gives way to  the next social object that captures everyone's attention until that too is replaced by the next shiny object and so on.

 

**Resonance is a technique that allows a social object to enjoy a greater lifespan and continue to swim upstream while other content strategies wash away in real-time.

 

**As you think about your content strategy for social networks, do so from the perspective of a social producer.

 

**While the social effect is certainly a goal, the social effect is also the result of social design.

 

**In the end, people are going to talk, so give them something to talk about!

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering, "Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/Qvxa6J]


Via janlgordon, Karen Dietz, Dona Chakraborty
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janlgordon's comment, September 25, 2012 11:10 AM
Marty, I loved your insights and comments, right on the money - this is indeed one of those articles that ignites that spark in me and I can see in you as well - taking static content and moving it to the next level. Thank you for your kind words and wisdom as well.
Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, September 25, 2012 12:05 PM
Thanks Jan. I think your notes are more valuable than the article and this is NOT the first time that has been true :). Certainly the article by itself isn't as powerful as article + your note, so the very definition of the benefit of content curation - content becomes more valuable with each touch :). M
Josette Williams's comment, October 1, 2012 4:14 PM
Really happy you like this article Gust.
this curious life
Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind. - Dr. Seuss
Curated by Janet Devlin
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July was Earth's hottest month on record, NOAA says - BBC News

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Researchers make important step towards a solar cell that generates hydrogen.


Researchers have developed a very promising prototype of a new solar celll. The material gallium phosphide enables their solar cell to produce the clean fuel hydrogen gas from liquid water. Processing the gallium phosphide in the form of very small nanowires is novel and helps to boost the yield by a factor of ten. And does so using ten thousand times less precious material.


According to Bakkers, it's not simply about the yield -- where there is still a lot of scope for improvement he points out: "For the nanowires we needed ten thousand less precious GaP material than in cells with a flat surface. That makes these kinds of cells potentially a great deal cheaper," Bakkers says. "In addition, GaP is also able to extract oxygen from the water -- so you then actually have a fuel cell in which you can temporarily store your solar energy. In short, for a solar fuels future we cannot ignore gallium phosphide any longer."


GaP has good electrical properties but the drawback that it cannot easily absorb light when it is a large flat surface as used in GaP solar cells. The researchers have overcome this problem by making a grid of very small GaP nanowires, measuring five hundred nanometers (a millionth of a millimeter) long and ninety nanometers thick. This immediately boosted the yield of hydrogen by a factor of ten to 2.9 percent. A record for GaP cells, even though this is still some way off the fifteen percent achieved by silicon cells coupled to a battery.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The 1991 law presumes veterans were exposed to the defoliant if they have certain diseases and “set foot” in Vietnam, but Navy vets and Air Force vets in Thailand say they were also exposed. Here’s our guide to groups seeking Agent Orange benefits.
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Janet Devlin's insight:

man's continuing attempt to establish dominion over nature: the commoditisation of life

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Solving the mystery of the invisible 'sea sapphire'

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How the copepods can switch from being multicolored to disappearing completely.

 

Some of the most spectacular colors produced by organisms are derived from periodic layered structures on the length scale of the wavelengths of visible light. Such photonic structures consist of regularly alternating layers of two transparent materials with different refractive indices, such that light reflected from the different layers undergoes constructive interference for some wavelengths and destructive interference for others.


A multilayer stack can act as a spectrally selective reflector when the optical thickness nd (the product of the physical thickness d and the refractive index n) of the layers falls within the wavelength range of visible light, resulting in the observation of distinct colors. The most efficient reflector arrangement is the quarter-wave stack, where the optical thickness of both layers is equal to the one-fourth of the wavelength of the reflected light.


One of the most striking examples of such photonic structures are the male sapphirinid copepods, small marine crustaceans that produce a variety of different colors, but only when the incident light is at specific angles to the animal’s dorsal surface. Thus, the copepods “flash” light of a specific color, but as they move they become transparent and suddenly seem to almost completely disappear (a movie showing this behavior is available at http://www.liquidguru.com/octopod-copepod/). The goal of this study is to understand the structural basis for both the variability of the colors and the strong angular dependence of the reflected light.


Members of the copepod family Sapphirinidae are found between the ocean surface and a depth of 300 m. Their reflectivity and color are thought to play a role in interspecies communication and mate recognition in the open ocean. The iridescent colors of the males of each species are closely related to their distribution in the epipelagic zone and are thought to provide increased visibility against the ambient background. Species with warm colors (i.e., with longer wavelengths) are usually found in shallow waters, whereas species with blue colors are usually found in deeper waters, where the spectrum of the filtered solar light is primarily in the blue-green range.


Even within the Sapphirinidae family, the Sapphirina metallinamales, the main focus of this study, are exceptional in the variety and brilliance of their colors. The multilayer reflectors responsible for the colors in S. metallina are composed of stacks of anhydrous guanine crystals separated by cytoplasm, similar to those found in iridescent fish scales, silver spiders, and chameleons. In contrast to the crystals found in chameleons, the guanine crystals in the sapphirinids, as well as those in fish and spiders, are thin plates. The exceptionally high refractive index along the axis normal to the biogenic plate crystals provides high index contrast relative to the cytoplasm. Unlike the guanine crystals in fish and spiders, the sapphirinid crystals are perfectly regular hexagons in an extremely ordered arrangement (1). Earlier studies reported that the measured thickness of the crystals did not match the expected reflectance (or reflectivity) calculated assuming an ideal multilayer system. Furthermore, no connection was found between the thickness of the crystals and the copepod colors.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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