this curious life
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this curious life
Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind. - Dr. Seuss
Curated by Janet Devlin
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Women's Restroom Sign Breaks Stereotypes

Women's Restroom Sign Breaks Stereotypes | this curious life | Scoop.it

The It Was Never a Dress campaign is not only taking social media by storm, it is also changing the way we view the traditional women's bathroom sign. We see that the men's figure wears pants and the women's symbol wears a dress, but what if it was never meant to be a dress in the first place?  Tania Katan launched the popular #ItWasNeverADress campaign at last week's 'Girls in Tech' conference with the idea that the female figure is instead wearing a cape, asserting that women can be superheroes or anything else they choose to be."


Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 10:30 AM

I love this! Unit 3: Cultural landscape and norms.

Katie's curator insight, May 22, 2015 12:19 PM

In this article it suggest that the stereotypical dress for the the women bathroom sign is not a dress, but a cape. This hows that women can be superheroes or whatever they want to be. Still today there is a lack of women in he workforce compared to men. For every 4 men working working for Google there is 1 women and half of them quit because of the poor work environment. I think this helps represent that women are capable of anything. This is an example of women in the workforce and gender equity.  

Seth Forman's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:08 PM

Summary: This article basically explains the story of the recently emerged #ItWasNeverADress campaign. This is a pretty cool article because I never really payed attention to how even a restroom sign could be considered gender inequality. 

 

Insight: This article is relevant to unit 6 because gender inequality is an important measure of development.

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Media attention suggests fat may be the new sexy

Media attention suggests fat may be the new sexy | this curious life | Scoop.it
A usual academic event had a rather unusual impact earlier this month – a conference drew international media attention.Fat Studies: Reflective Intersections took place at Massey University in Wellington…...

 

'Unfortunately, much of the media coverage missed the point, misrepresenting the event as a “fat pride convention”  .......... instead of an academic conference. While this did allow for a broader conversation about fat hatred and discrimination, it didn’t promote any further understanding of critical areas of study in academic scholarship – something many lay people are often confused about.'

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