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Rescooped by Emily Seeber from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
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An iPad Toolkit - apps that have transformed my practice - ICT Evangelist

An iPad Toolkit - apps that have transformed my practice - ICT Evangelist | Thinking Skills | Scoop.it
“ n case you hadn’t noticed, I’m quite a fan of the iPad (the Lollipop Nexus 9’s not too bad either). Not because of its design or because its by Apple or any of that, but because of its keen heritage in the learning arena. Any one who knows me will tell you that I am not one for using tech for tech’s sake, despite my evangelist moniker. Use of technology in a cross curricular sense should be measured and done with consideration for the best potential learning outcomes. With all that said, I’ve been doing this for quite some time now and I thought it time that I shared some of the Apps that have stuck by me or have struck me for their ease of use and impact upon learning in the classroom.”
Via John Evans
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Cheryl Turner's curator insight, February 1, 2015 2:02 PM

this article is not linked, so you have to look up each app, and there is no description of the apps, but might be worth a look

flea palmer's curator insight, February 3, 2015 4:47 AM

Many I haven't  tried here...

Ruth Ersapah's curator insight, February 7, 2015 6:21 AM

Useful list of apps.

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The SAMR Model In 120 Seconds - teachthought

The SAMR Model In 120 Seconds - teachthought | Thinking Skills | Scoop.it
“ This is not a post about the SAMR model (a way of thinking about how to teach with technology that uses an acronym as a mnemonic device)–well, not in any way that’s going to further the conversation around it, or push your thinking about the ins and outs of using it. In December, we shared a post that used Starbucks as an analogy to illustrate the SAMR model. We also shared a post about using the SAMR model for more effective teaching with apps. We’ve even offered a kind of alternative to the SAMR model with our Stages of #edtech Disruption. So why share a simple video of the same model we’ve already covered in more detail elsewhere? Because, in lieu of the slightly murky analogy involing cheese and tennis balls, the video does a pretty good job of explaining the idea in less time than it takes to watch Apple make another $18-billion-of-profits-in-a-single-quarter announcement.”
Via John Evans
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Rescooped by Emily Seeber from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
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Using Showbie with the SAMR Model - Showbie

Using Showbie with the SAMR Model - Showbie | Thinking Skills | Scoop.it

"Since I began using iPads in my teaching 4 years ago, choosing the right tools for a lesson becomes even more important. This is simply down to the number of apps that are targeted at education. It could be the case that a teacher would look at their weekly planning and type each lesson keyword into the App Store to find an app for every lesson. What the teacher may be left with is very little space on the school iPads, very little space left in the school budget and very little confidence left in the school teachers who are unfamiliar with using iPads in their lessons and are presented with an iPad with hundreds of apps installed. The question is: how many of the education apps out there actually improve upon existing teaching and learning resources? This is where the SAMR model comes in. Every classroom in the world has resources: books, tools, posters and often technology. Technology in my opinion is another classroom tool that does not replace other resources, rather co-exist with them. Choosing technology for every lesson can be tempting but often, it is not required."


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Tom Mulvey's curator insight, February 1, 2015 12:59 PM

...and a good explanation of how it can be used for all aspects of the SAMR model.

Lois Grasso's curator insight, February 1, 2015 4:41 PM

Examples of iPad lessons using the SAMR model helps teachers advance their use of technology.