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The social origins of intelligence in the brain

The social origins of intelligence in the brain | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

By studying the injuries and aptitudes of Vietnam War veterans who suffered penetrating head wounds during the war, researchers have found that brain regions that contribute to optimal social functioning are also vital to general intelligence and emotional intelligence.

 

This finding, reported in the journal Brain, bolsters the view that general intelligence emerges from the emotional and social context of one’s life.

“We are trying to understand the nature of general intelligence and to what extent our intellectual abilities are grounded in social cognitive abilities,” said Aron Barbey, a University of Illinois professor of neuroscience, psychology, and speech and hearing science.

 

Barbey, an affiliate of the Beckman Institute and he Institute for Genomic Biology at the University of Illinois, led the new study with an international team of collaborators.

 

The study involved 144 Vietnam veterans injured by shrapnel or bullets that penetrated the skull, damaging distinct brain tissues while leaving neighboring tissues intact. Using CT scans, the scientists painstakingly mapped the affected brain regions of each participant, then pooled the data to build a collective map of the brain.

 

The researchers used a battery of carefully designed tests to assess participants’ intellectual, emotional and social capabilities. They then looked for damage in specific brain regions tied to deficits in the participants’ ability to navigate intellectual, emotional or social realms. Social problem solving in this analysis primarily involved conflict resolution with friends, family and peers at work.

 

As in their earlier studies of general intelligence and emotional intelligence, the researchers found that regions of the frontal cortex (at the front of the brain), the parietal cortex (further back near the top of the head) and the temporal lobes (on the sides of the head behind the ears) are all implicated in social problem solving. The regions that contributed to social functioning in the parietal and temporal lobes were located only in the brain’s left hemisphere, while both left and right frontal lobes were involved.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Helen Teague's insight:

From Dr. Stefan Gruenwald:

By studying the injuries and aptitudes of Vietnam War veterans who suffered penetrating head wounds during the war, researchers have found that brain regions that contribute to optimal social functioning are also vital to general intelligence and emotional intelligence.

 

This finding, reported in the journal Brain, bolsters the view that general intelligence emerges from the emotional and social context of one’s life.

“We are trying to understand the nature of general intelligence and to what extent our intellectual abilities are grounded in social cognitive abilities,” said Aron Barbey, a University of Illinois professor of neuroscience, psychology, and speech and hearing science.

 

Barbey, an affiliate of the Beckman Institute and he Institute for Genomic Biology at the University of Illinois, led the new study with an international team of collaborators.

 

The study involved 144 Vietnam veterans injured by shrapnel or bullets that penetrated the skull, damaging distinct brain tissues while leaving neighboring tissues intact. Using CT scans, the scientists painstakingly mapped the affected brain regions of each participant, then pooled the data to build a collective map of the brain.

 

The researchers used a battery of carefully designed tests to assess participants’ intellectual, emotional and social capabilities. They then looked for damage in specific brain regions tied to deficits in the participants’ ability to navigate intellectual, emotional or social realms. Social problem solving in this analysis primarily involved conflict resolution with friends, family and peers at work.

 

As in their earlier studies of general intelligence and emotional intelligence, the researchers found that regions of the frontal cortex (at the front of the brain), the parietal cortex (further back near the top of the head) and the temporal lobes (on the sides of the head behind the ears) are all implicated in social problem solving. The regions that contributed to social functioning in the parietal and temporal lobes were located only in the brain’s left hemisphere, while both left and right frontal lobes were involved.

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Eric Chan Wei Chiang's curator insight, August 2, 2014 12:30 PM

There is a popular myth that humans use no more than 10% of their brains throughout their entire life. This has been shown to be untrue as brain damage consistently results in loss of function. Nonetheless, this myth provided the premise for some great movies such as the 2014 film, Lucy 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucy_(2014_film)

 

Read more scoops on the brain here:

http://www.scoop.it/t/biotech-and-beyond/?tag=Brain

Jocelyn Stoller's curator insight, August 13, 2014 4:55 AM

Strange that CT scans were used. High resolution Functional MRI would show both structure and activity. Other imaging methods such as optogenetics, MEG, TMS, BOLD, etc. could also help to pinpoint these areas without using radiation on an already-injured brain.

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Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read - OEDB.org

Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read - OEDB.org | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Click above to view full image! Any book lover can tell you: diving into a great novel is an immersive experience that can make your brain come alive with imagery and emotions and even turn on your senses.

Via Anu Ojaranta
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sarah's curator insight, October 27, 2013 7:08 AM

intéressant

Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, October 27, 2013 4:07 PM

Educators have long told us that reading expands our minds. Here are some of the specific ways in which they do so.

Carol Rine's curator insight, October 29, 2013 7:54 AM

This is a GREAT article that has lots of embedded cross-linked articles within it.  :O)

 

Carol

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NSF 2016 STEM For All Video Showcase

NSF 2016 STEM For All Video Showcase | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
2016 NSF Video Showcase Advancing STEM Learning For All: Sharing Cutting Edge Work and Community Discourse
Helen Teague's insight:
156 videos representing NSF-funded research, 21336 Unique visitors from 138 countries, #stemvideohall
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Advancing STEM Learning for All: Sharing cutting edge work and community discourse

Join us at http://stemforall2016.videohall.com! On May 17th – 23rd, 2016, more than 150 projects will showcase three-minute videos of their innovative work…
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Helen Teague's curator insight, May 13, 11:46 PM
2016 Video Showcase – Advancing STEM for All May 17-23, 2016 (online) Join us next week for the 2nd annual video showcase! This interactive, online event features more than 400 presenters and co-presenters who have submitted 156 videos on STEM education research & development. Visit the showcase to view, comment, and cast your vote for your favorite videos and projects. All projects featured in the 3-minute videos were funded by NSF and represent cutting-edge research and development in STEM and computer science education.
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The Best Airlines in North America

The Best Airlines in North America | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
An annual study measured passenger satisfaction based on seven criteria.
Helen Teague's insight:
Props to Jet Blue!
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National Readathon Day Will Support Early Literacy Development | Digital Book World

National Readathon Day Will Support Early Literacy Development | Digital Book World | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
National Readathon Day is a joint initiative by Penguin Random House and the American Library Association to support early literacy development.
Helen Teague's insight:
National Read-a-Thon Day is May 21, 2016: what will you read?
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12 Critical Competencies For Leadership in the Future

12 Critical Competencies For Leadership in the Future | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
The rate of change in the business world today is greater than our ability to respond. In a world that is often describe…

Via Marc Wachtfogel, PhD
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Mechanical Walking Space Man's curator insight, April 29, 4:28 AM
The mission: creativity in the boardroom
elearning at eCampus ULg's curator insight, May 2, 3:43 AM
Nice infographics ;-)
Authentis Formations's curator insight, May 6, 3:58 AM
Le leader du futur...le
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These futuristic driverless pods will run on Singapore's roads by end of the year

These futuristic driverless pods will run on Singapore's roads by end of the year | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
The pods will be able to travel within campuses and will bring people to school and work.
Helen Teague's insight:
Needs propel design changes and design changes propel Innovation. :)  Post by Victoria Ho
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9 Simple Ways To Get People To Respond To Your Emails

9 Simple Ways To Get People To Respond To Your Emails | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

We get an average of 120 emails every day. Here's how to make your messages stand out and actually get a response.


Via Daniel Watson, Stewart-Marshall
Helen Teague's insight:
wish it did not advocate a 3rd grade reading level for writing, but otherwise, excellent tips here.
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Daniel Watson's curator insight, April 6, 7:09 PM

 

One of the biggest challenges in business, is to get the recipients of your emails, to respond to your requests and at the same time respond in a timely manner. Given the volume of email most people in the business world receive every day, it is not surprising that people are selective about what they respond to, and how quickly they will respond to the emails that they determine that require them to respond. It is possible to improve both the response rate and the timeliness of the responses you receive and this article suggests 9 ways you can improve your email response rates (the first tip is one you should always use).

9Point10 's curator insight, April 7, 8:07 AM

Email marketing may be efficient but you need it to also be effective.  Apply these tips and you'll improve the level of engagement from your list of recipients.

Adele Taylor's curator insight, April 7, 8:08 PM
I think added to these tips it is important to think about the person you are writing the email to and adjusting to suit their communication style.
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The Surprisingly Bitter Controversy Over American Highway Fonts

The Surprisingly Bitter Controversy Over American Highway Fonts | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
The Federal Highway Administration has rescinded its approval for the use of an alternative roadside typeface called Clearview, once again making the 70-year-old Highway Gothic typeface the single standard for directional signage.
Helen Teague's insight:
Who knew that fonts were a subject of extensive research and that there is a roadside typeface called Clearview? 
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Raymond Tomlinson dies at 74; inventor of modern email

Raymond Tomlinson dies at 74; inventor of modern email | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Raymond Tomlinson, the inventor of modern email and a technological leader, has died. Tomlinson died Saturday, the Raytheon Co. said. He was 74. Email existed in a limited capacity before Tomlinson in that electronic messages could be shared amid multiple people within a limited framework. But...

Helen Teague's insight:
The @ sign is forever grateful...RIP...Raymond Tomlinson
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10 Great Apps to Make Travel Easier

10 Great Apps to Make Travel Easier | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
If you travel a lot I bet your phone looks a lot like mine: tons of folders loaded with apps. I easily could’ve written a post on a 100 travel apps to use but that would’ve been way too long… Read More
Helen Teague's insight:
lots of great info and apps!
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Everything You Need To Know About Lost Luggage

Everything You Need To Know About Lost Luggage | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

No one wants to deal with lost luggage, and these tips will help keep your stuff safe.

Helen Teague's insight:
hope it never happens ... but just in case... these are good suggestionss
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A little known hack from Japan to get your notebook organized

A little known hack from Japan to get your notebook organized | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

th February 2015 by Adam 120 Comments

Tools like Evernote make organizing and finding information really simple. Yet despite that, I still often find myself using the humble notebook to jot down valuable ideas, especially when I’m on the go.

However notebooks are hard to organize your ideas. You either split your notebook into several sections for each ‘category’ and end up wasting valuable pages in the quieter sections or you just write your ideas as they come along making them hard to find

later on.


Via Sharon Bakar
Helen Teague's insight:

I am using this method for my dissertation notes...

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Sharon Bakar's curator insight, January 19, 4:14 AM

Good advice for organizing your writing notebook too.

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How To Teach Children That Failure Is The Secret To Success - NPR

How To Teach Children That Failure Is The Secret To Success - NPR | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Is failure a positive opportunity to learn and grow, or is it a negative experience that hinders success? How parents answer that question has a big influence on how much children think they can improve their intelligence through hard work, a study says.

"Parents are a really critical force in child development when you think about how motivation and mindsets develop," says Kyla Haimovitz, a professor of psychology at Stanford University. She coauthored the study, published in Psychological Science with colleague Carol Dweck, who pioneered research on mindsets. "Parents have this powerful effect really early on and throughout childhood to send messages about what is failure, how to respond to it."

Although there's been a lot of research on how these forces play out, relatively little looks at what parents can do to motivate their kids in school, Haimovitz says. This study begins filling that gap.

Via John Evans
Helen Teague's insight:
"Parents are a really critical force in child development when you think about how motivation and mindsets develop," says Kyla Haimovitz, a professor of psychology at Stanford University.
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Technical Support Service 1-800-439-2178 Hp, Dell and other brands's curator insight, May 18, 5:58 AM
Dell technical support phone number 1-800-931-5079 to repair Dell Computer and Laptop. To Install Dell computer, laptop driver talk dell technical support customers. http://dell.technicalsupportservicesinc.com/
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Twitter to Stop Counting Photos and Links in 140-Character Limit

Twitter to Stop Counting Photos and Links in 140-Character Limit | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Twitter Inc. is making a major shift in how it counts characters in Tweets, giving users more freedom to compose longer messages.
Helen Teague's insight:
Shift in the counting mechanism... >140
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Rest: The Antidote for Discouragement

Rest: The Antidote for Discouragement | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
slumped down on the park bench outside my classroom, hung my head in my hands, and cried. As a new teacher, at the end of the week, I felt utter defeat. The magnitude of change was overwhelming, the children weren't learning fast enough, the test scores were a disappointment, and I feared that I wouldn't capture some of my little ones at all. My diverse suburban Orange County school might be my last. I didn't know if I could continue.

Just then Susie Cornett, master teacher and fireball of positivity, noticed me on my classroom bench. She sat down and put her arm around my shoulders. While I don't remember any gold nuggets of wisdom, I did vow that I'd learn from teachers who made a career out of this work. I remember thinking, "I want to be just like Susie Cornett!" I studied her life and teachers like her to learn about thriving in this work I love -- because when I thrive, my students benefit from my model!

That vow was about 20 years ago. Since then, I've continued to inquire, "What practices help teachers sustain their sacred work?" I don't consider models who come across as crusty, negative, or cynical. I know the system can beat goodness out of us. I'm more curious about what nurtures goodness, vision, and a few dewdrops of idealism in our profession. How do teachers cultivate affection and dedication for their students? How do we sustain the energy to paint each day, week, and year with a fresh brush?

I know for sure that educators who sustain this work learn how to care for themselves. They practice healthy lifestyles, have boundaries, and aren't apologetic about taking time for themselves.

Via John Evans
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We Figured Out Why All of Your Tech Speaks in a Female Voice

We Figured Out Why All of Your Tech Speaks in a Female Voice | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
A scientific explanation for a curious digital-age phenomenon.
Helen Teague's insight:
The main AI assistants have female voices
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4 Stories Great Leaders Tell To Engage Their People

4 Stories Great Leaders Tell To Engage Their People | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
German novelist and playwright Gustav Freytag wanted to understand how storytelling impacted the human psyche. He wondered, “What makes a story so engaging that it changes a person’s behavior?” After studying William Shakespeare’s work, Freytag designed a map of storytelling—a key that explained why the man considered ‘the greatest writer [...]

Via Anne Leong
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Roy Sheneman, PhD's curator insight, January 26, 2015 12:47 PM

The best leaders are definitely story-tellers?

Matthew Farmer's curator insight, January 27, 2015 1:53 AM

Powerful stories are told with conviction and the most powerful are often told on the basis of personal experience. 


Learning to articulate your powerful personal learning experiences as stories will not only help you to reflect on your learning and therefore make it more powerful, but also help you share your learning with others and influence them to take action.  Leadership indeed!

James Hutchison's curator insight, January 28, 2015 11:01 AM

Of course you reach people by telling stories - it's how we make sense out of life - you can give the theory but you have to provide real world examples and that's why we have stories. Stories help us understand life. But if you tell a story to teach a moral I would suggest that unless you live by that story's moral lesson it doesn't matter how many stories you tell - nobody will believe you. Telling a good story is one thing but having integrity is another.

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3 Types of EdTech Baggage: Toolsets, Mindsets, Skillsets - DMLcentral

3 Types of EdTech Baggage: Toolsets, Mindsets, Skillsets - DMLcentral | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Everyone is bringing “baggage” with them when interacting with technologies. I want to consider three types of edtech “baggage”: the toolsets
Helen Teague's insight:
Concise yet comprehensive treatment of the perceptions we all bring to technology by Doug Belshaw. Includes references to neo-luddites and the diffusion of innovation curve.
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Why Learning Is Central to Sustained Innovation

Why Learning Is Central to Sustained Innovation | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
the only things many companies actually do under the heading of people development is to have an annual training-hours target and a travel budget for sending employees to conferences. If managers really thought that people were their greatest asset and that it’s the energy and creativity of employees that drives innovation, why do companies do so little? Why doesn’t growing and developing people excite them just as much as installing new additive manufacturing equipment or the latest cloud-based collaboration tool?Click here to edit the content

the only things many companies actually do under the heading of people development is to have an annual training-hours target and a travel budget for sending employees to conferences. If managers really thought that people were their greatest asset and that it’s the energy and creativity of employees that drives innovation, why do companies do so little? Why doesn’t growing and developing people excite them just as much as installing new additive manufacturing equipment or the latest cloud-based collaboration tool?

1

Via The Learning Factor, Stewart-Marshall
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Margaret Driscoll, Learning Organization Librarian's curator insight, March 18, 5:28 PM

Operational excellence requires cultivating an expectation for continuous improvement in all employees.

Christopher Scorey's curator insight, March 19, 10:53 PM

Education is key in today's society. I love to learn, to expand my knowledge, but sometimes I find it challenging to absorb information as some tasks educate me and others just drive me crazy. This picture expresses my thoughts on learning because some types of tasks hinder and others further learning, it all differs with each person. For me learning through action and visuals help me absorb more information.

Karina Calvo's curator insight, March 23, 4:07 PM

Operational excellence requires cultivating an expectation for continuous improvement in all employees.

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The AP Finally Realizes It’s 2016, Will Let Us Stop Capitalizing ‘Internet’

The AP Finally Realizes It’s 2016, Will Let Us Stop Capitalizing ‘Internet’ | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
It has been decreed. Thank God.
Helen Teague's insight:
iWonder if it is now the iNTERNET!
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How Your Brain Reacts To Change

How Your Brain Reacts To Change | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Dealing with change can be incredibly unsettling, especially in the workplace. But understanding the neuroscience behind our behavior—how and why our brains work the way they do—offers insight into just what's happening in those moments of uncertainty and how best to handle them.

"If we want to be performing at our best, our brains need certain things," says Hilary Scarlett, U.K.-based author of the new book Neuroscience for Organizational Change.

What are those necessities? Fast Company spoke with Scarlett about what drives our behavior during moments of change and how best to handle it.

Via John Evans, Miloš Bajčetić
Helen Teague's insight:
Features the work of Hilary Scarlett and her new book Neuroscience for Organizational Change.
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 21, 2:11 PM
When we choose change and can make of other change that is happening around us, it helps. I experienced that change in school is not all it is cracked up to be. It is often foisted upon teachers in ways that diminish who they are and their professional judgement.
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Video: Waking Up to Five Planets

Video: Waking Up to Five Planets | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
With the help of an astronomer, a photographer captured this time-lapse video early one morning in late January.
Helen Teague's insight:
Awe-inspiring look at 5 planet line-up from the NY Times
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Rumi - Two Kinds of Intelligence

Rumi says there are two kinds of intelligence: "one acquired, as a child in school memorizes facts and concepts...With such intelligence you rise in the worl...


Via Michael Goodman, Wes Thomas, Lynnette Van Dyke
Helen Teague's insight:

a necessary rationale to teach in a variety of ways

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Charles Whitaker's curator insight, March 1, 6:06 AM

Michael Meade, keeps bringing it....

Wes Thomas's curator insight, March 2, 9:45 PM

Michael Meade, keeps bringing it....

Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 3, 7:02 AM

Michael Meade, keeps bringing it....

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Images of Aging Photocontest » Images of Aging Photocontest: The Story Behind the Image

Images of Aging Photocontest: The Story Behind the Image created by HELEN TEAGUE  using Adobe Slate |  02.29.16  | 
Helen Teague's insight:
Images of Aging Photocontest Digital Storytelling photo essay » Images of Aging Photocontest: The Story Behind the Images, made using Adobe Slate
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Two Signs of Overwriting and Why It’s a Problem

Two Signs of Overwriting and Why It’s a Problem | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Often, when I read a submission from a newer writer or one who has just come out of a fiction class, I flag it for overwriting. What is overwriting? Basically, it’s a sense that the prose (and the writer behind it) is trying too hard to get their point across or impress the reader. Sometimes I wonder if people who overwrite are trying to live up to some idea of “fiction writer” that exists in their heads…a scribe who uses $10 words and milks every image and otherwise packs every sentence until it’s dragging and bloated. They want to make sure we get they’re a real writer. Sometimes this process is at the front of their mind, sometimes it happens without them realizing. 


Via Sharon Bakar
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Sharon Bakar's curator insight, January 22, 10:22 AM

Very useful post on overwriting - what it is and how to prevent it.