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Why Powerful People Just Don't Get Empathy

Why Powerful People Just Don't Get Empathy | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

If your boss is a jerk, there might be a scientific reason for it. A new study suggests feeling powerful dampens the part of the brain that helps us connect with others.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Helen Teague's insight:

explains a lot about my previous boss, so glad I am working for my current boss  :)

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Verica Markovic's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:17 AM

Etude intéressante, mais à nuancer.

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:52 PM

Not surprising but still needs more exploration by authentic leaders, the key is that one can overpower the tendency to quelsh empathy in their roles. But it is not easy nor is it often truly understood.

Chris Brown's curator insight, October 2, 2013 6:05 PM

"Whether you're with a team at work [or] your family dinner, all of that hinges on how we adapt our behaviors to the behaviors of other people, and power takes a bite out of that ability, which is too bad."

 

A powerful statement.  How can we keep focused on connecting to others so we don't become less empathetic?

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Rescooped by Helen Teague from School libraries for information literacy and learning!
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Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read - OEDB.org

Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read - OEDB.org | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Click above to view full image! Any book lover can tell you: diving into a great novel is an immersive experience that can make your brain come alive with imagery and emotions and even turn on your senses.

Via Anu Ojaranta
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sarah's curator insight, October 27, 2013 7:08 AM

intéressant

Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, October 27, 2013 4:07 PM

Educators have long told us that reading expands our minds. Here are some of the specific ways in which they do so.

Carol Rine's curator insight, October 29, 2013 7:54 AM

This is a GREAT article that has lots of embedded cross-linked articles within it.  :O)

 

Carol

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Whine Less, Do More! - YouTube

How to Get Ahead When Life’s not “Fair” Have you ever worked with someone who incessantly whined about how unfair things are, how bad or how wrong? When peop...
Helen Teague's insight:

 “Every decision that impacts our lives will be made by the person who has the power to make that decision – not the ‘right’ person, or the ‘smartest’ person, or the ‘best’ person – make peace with this fact.” ~Peter Drucker

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Einstein's advice to Marie Curie on dealing with trolls: "Don't read that hogwash"

It still holds true today.
Helen Teague's insight:

Al had her back!

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19 Iconic Everyday Objects and Their Amazing Design Stories | Learnist

19 Iconic Everyday Objects and Their Amazing Design Stories | Learnist | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Background stories of how some of these objects were designed. This board explores the design stories of some common everyday objects, from the sticky note to the ballpoint pen.

Helen Teague's insight:

Innovation is sometimes accidental!

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The evolution of risk in the face of technology

The evolution of risk in the face of technology | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Technology is transforming the way companies do business, creating new risks and opportunities.
Helen Teague's insight:

Post by Catherine Bolgar : The Internet is estimated to have accounted for 21% of economic growth in mature economies from 2006-2011...“The mistake businesses make is they assume technology is the answer,” Mr. Collins says. “Technology merely enables the answer. The answer is how do people interact and react to the world around them. The technology has to support customer demands and needs, even if the customer doesn’t know they need it today. The customer didn’t know what the Internet was until it appeared. Once it appeared it became indispensable.”

Especially  helpful are the steps for companies to take to remain nimble.

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Leadership: Goodbye email of a Leader

Leadership: Goodbye email of a Leader | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
I have been struggling to write this email for the last couple of hours. I am finding it very difficult to sum up the experiences of 10 years and 2 months in a couple of lines....
Helen Teague's insight:

excellent read, great for discussion

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Rescooped by Helen Teague from Transformational Leadership
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Transformational Leadership

Transformational Leadership for Organizational Behavior.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Helen Teague's insight:

leading through positives...thank you for scooping this, Susan Bainbridge

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Rescooped by Helen Teague from Life @ Work
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20 words that once meant something very different

20 words that once meant something very different | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Words change meaning all the time -- and over time. Language historian Anne Curzan takes a closer look at this phenomenon, and shares some words that used to mean something totally different.

Via Barb Jemmott
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This 12-Year-Old Invented A Robot That Could Help End Malaria

This 12-Year-Old Invented A Robot That Could Help End Malaria | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
David Cohen understands that mosquitoes aren't just pesky annoyances -- they're global killers, too.

That's why the 12-year-old from Dallas invented a robot that drowns the pests using a pump-jet system that traps them underwater using mesh. He s...
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Lifelong Learners: How Teachers Develop New Skills and Improve Their Practice | Tech Learning

Lifelong Learners: How Teachers Develop New Skills and Improve Their Practice | Tech Learning | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
The Resource for Education Technology Leaders focusing on K-12 educators. Site contains a Software Reviews Database, articles from Technology & Learning Magazine, articles from Educators in Educators' eZine, Event and Contest listings, Reader suggested Web sites, and weekly news updates on education technology leaders.
Helen Teague's insight:

Just as teachers and parents want students to keep learning, administrators want teachers to keep improving. Here’s a look at how schools and districts make it easy for teachers to continue their learning. - See more at: http://www.techlearning.com/features/0039/lifelong-learners-how-teachers-develop-new-skills-and-improve-their-practice/55247#sthash.0EbWszar.dpuf

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Rescooped by Helen Teague from Amazing Science
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Study shows how epigenetic memory is passed across generations

Study shows how epigenetic memory is passed across generations | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

A growing body of evidence suggests that environmental stresses can cause changes in gene expression that are transmitted from parents to their offspring, making "epigenetics" a hot topic. Epigenetic modifications do not affect the DNA sequence of genes, but change how the DNA is packaged and how genes are expressed. Now, a study by scientists at UC Santa Cruz shows how epigenetic memory can be passed across generations and from cell to cell during development.

The study, published September 19, 2014 in Science, focused on one well studied epigenetic modification--the methylation of a DNA packaging protein called histone H3. Methylation of a particular amino acid (lysine 27) in histone H3 is known to turn off or "repress" genes, and this epigenetic mark is found in all multicellular animals, from humans to the tiny roundworm C. elegans that was used in this study.

 

"There has been ongoing debate about whether the methylation mark can be passed on through cell divisions and across generations, and we've now shown that it is," said corresponding author Susan Strome, a professor of molecular, cell and developmental biology at UC Santa Cruz.

 

Strome's lab created worms with a mutation that knocks out the enzyme responsible for making the methylation mark, then bred them with normal worms. Using fluorescent labels, they were able to track the fates of marked and unmarked chromosomes under the microscope, from egg cells and sperm to the dividing cells of embryos after fertilization. Embryos from mutant egg cells fertilized by normal sperm had six methylated chromosomes (from the sperm) and six unmarked or "naked" chromosomes (from the egg).

 

As embryos develop, the cells replicate their chromosomes and divide. The researchers found that when a marked chromosome replicates, the two daughter chromosomes are both marked. But without the enzyme needed for histone methylation, the marks become progressively diluted with each cell division.

 

"The mark stays on the chromosomes derived from the initial chromosome that had the mark, but there's not enough mark for both daughter chromosomes to be fully loaded," Strome said. "So the mark is bright in a one-cell embryo, less bright after the cell divides, dimmer still in a four-cell embryo, and by about 24 to 48 cells we can't see it anymore."

 

The researchers then did the converse experiment, fertilizing normal egg cells with mutant sperm. The methylation enzyme (called PRC2) is normally present in egg cells but not in sperm, which don't contribute much more than their chromosomes to the embryo. So the embryos in the new experiment still had six naked chromosomes (this time from the sperm) and six marked chromosomes, but now they also had the enzyme.

 

"Remarkably, when we watch the chromosomes through cell divisions, the marked chromosomes remain marked and stay bright, because the enzyme keeps restoring the mark, but the naked chromosomes stay naked, division after division," Strome said. "That shows that the pattern of marks that was inherited is being transmitted through multiple cell divisions."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Helen Teague's insight:

A growing body of evidence suggests that environmental stresses can cause changes in gene expression that are transmitted from parents to their offspring, making "epigenetics" a hot topic. Epigenetic modifications do not affect the DNA sequence of genes, but change how the DNA is packaged and how genes are expressed. Now, a study by scientists at UC Santa Cruz shows how epigenetic memory can be passed across generations and from cell to cell during development.

The study, published September 19, 2014 in Science, focused on one well studied epigenetic modification--the methylation of a DNA packaging protein called histone H3. Methylation of a particular amino acid (lysine 27) in histone H3 is known to turn off or "repress" genes, and this epigenetic mark is found in all multicellular animals, from humans to the tiny roundworm C. elegans that was used in this study.

 

"There has been ongoing debate about whether the methylation mark can be passed on through cell divisions and across generations, and we've now shown that it is," said corresponding author Susan Strome, a professor of molecular, cell and developmental biology at UC Santa Cruz.

 

Strome's lab created worms with a mutation that knocks out the enzyme responsible for making the methylation mark, then bred them with normal worms. Using fluorescent labels, they were able to track the fates of marked and unmarked chromosomes under the microscope, from egg cells and sperm to the dividing cells of embryos after fertilization. Embryos from mutant egg cells fertilized by normal sperm had six methylated chromosomes (from the sperm) and six unmarked or "naked" chromosomes (from the egg).

 

As embryos develop, the cells replicate their chromosomes and divide. The researchers found that when a marked chromosome replicates, the two daughter chromosomes are both marked. But without the enzyme needed for histone methylation, the marks become progressively diluted with each cell division.

 

"The mark stays on the chromosomes derived from the initial chromosome that had the mark, but there's not enough mark for both daughter chromosomes to be fully loaded," Strome said. "So the mark is bright in a one-cell embryo, less bright after the cell divides, dimmer still in a four-cell embryo, and by about 24 to 48 cells we can't see it anymore."

 

The researchers then did the converse experiment, fertilizing normal egg cells with mutant sperm. The methylation enzyme (called PRC2) is normally present in egg cells but not in sperm, which don't contribute much more than their chromosomes to the embryo. So the embryos in the new experiment still had six naked chromosomes (this time from the sperm) and six marked chromosomes, but now they also had the enzyme.

 

"Remarkably, when we watch the chromosomes through cell divisions, the marked chromosomes remain marked and stay bright, because the enzyme keeps restoring the mark, but the naked chromosomes stay naked, division after division," Strome said. "That shows that the pattern of marks that was inherited is being transmitted through multiple cell divisions."

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Gray2K : Boomer Retirement = Company Knowledge Void

Gray2K : Boomer Retirement = Company Knowledge Void | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Dr. Dan: This is what we need "Gray2K" - a clever tagline, something catchy (like Y2K, and with that level of interest).


Via Dr. Dan Kirsch
Helen Teague's insight:

The Silver Tsunami is real! When Boomers retire, a collective 3.3 billion years of experience will exit too. Companies are already finding it difficult to regain this expertise void.

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Dr. Dan Kirsch's curator insight, September 17, 8:05 AM

From Klever (and if you haven't already discovered Klever, take a look):


"Boomer Retirement = Company Knowledge Void
In the next five years, the so-called Silver Tsunami, or Gray2K, will sweep through every company as baby boomers start retiring en masse, taking with them a collective 3.3 billion years of experience that companies are already finding difficult to regain.  That knowledge is gone forever and the clock is ticking as the workplace collectively scrambles to capture the information before it retires with the employee."

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3 People You Need to Ignore Online

This is a guest post by Jon Acuff, the author of four books including Start.

Helen Teague's insight:

"The truth is, you should never waste time trying to turn someone who hates you into someone who likes you. Instead focus on turning people who like your dream into people who love your dream." Applies to folks both online and off.

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Why Asking for Help Makes You a Stronger Leader

Why Asking for Help Makes You a Stronger Leader | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
"We’re all imperfect and we all have needs. The weak usually do not ask for help, so they stay weak. If we recognize that we are imperfect, we will ask for help and we will pray for the guidance necessary to bring positive results to whatever we are doing." — John WoodenAsking for help wasn’t something that my parents ingrained in me. Well, that’s how I interpreted their guidance anyway. When they told me repeatedly to be confident, strong, and independent, I assumed that the opposite traits would be a bad thing.For so many of us, the idea of asking for help
Helen Teague's insight:

Includes 5 accurate assumptions why people often find it difficult to ask for and receive support

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Here's Why Einstein Thought Final Exams Were Bogus

Here's Why Einstein Thought Final Exams Were Bogus | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
In the recently released trove of Einstein documents, there's a short article in which he spells out his disdain for finals, calling them a nightmare. Here's how Einstein's thoughts pertain to the world of entrepreneurship, which is filled with comparably tedious annual rites (performance reviews, customer surveys, etc.).
Helen Teague's insight:

Also part of my weekend ed quote

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5 facts you should know about women who shaped modern physics

5 facts you should know about women who shaped modern physics | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Theoretical physicist (and TED Fellow) Shohini Ghose shares 5 facts about female physicists.
Helen Teague's insight:

1. Marie Curie is the only person to have won Nobel Prizes in two different scientific disciplines.

2. Only two women have ever won the Nobel Prize in physics.

and much more!

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Rescooped by Helen Teague from School Library Advocacy
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Your vocabulary at age 40 depends on how much you read as a teenager

Reading for pleasure as a child has been powerfully linked in research to the development of vocabulary and maths skills up to the age of 16. But does reading still have a part to play in the breadth of our adult vocabulary? Does it matter what kind of books you read, or is it just the amount of reading that counts?


Via Karen Bonanno
Helen Teague's insight:

study also cites that predictions that the decline in reading may have been exaggerated

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The Most Underutilized Tool in Making People Happier at Work

The Most Underutilized Tool in Making People Happier at Work | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Every language has a word for “thanks.” It’s one of the few concepts that works in a hut in Bali, a London skyscraper or a mini-mart in Peoria.In the U.S. (in November) and Canada (in October), we
Helen Teague's insight:

In the U.S. (in November) and Canada (in October), we have actual paid-time-off days of “thanks.” And while many of us spend these Thanksgiving days expressing gratitude for our families, friends, health or prosperity, what about thanking the people who make your business possible: Your team.

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Leadership: Recipe for successful leaders - 30 min of walking around

Leadership: Recipe for successful leaders - 30 min of walking around | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
I saw the great person talking to someone."I have heard a lot about you. I also want to be a successful leader. Tell me your secret. What do you do ? How do you lead such a large team ?

"Hey ! You want me to tell you my secret ? Well ... here it is ... I walk around .... "
Helen Teague's insight:

Glad to see posts on MBWA... it really works and helps build teams and keep management approachable

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There's An Excellent Reason Why A Blue Lightbulb Just Won The Nobel Prize

There's An Excellent Reason Why A Blue Lightbulb Just Won The Nobel Prize | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Blue LEDs win their inventors this year's Physics Nobel prize.
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Rescooped by Helen Teague from Eclectic Technology
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The World as 100 People | Visual.ly

The World as 100 People | Visual.ly | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
The World as 100 People. This idea has been around since 1990. This is my attempt at presenting the information.

Via Beth Dichter
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Linda Alexander's curator insight, October 21, 10:24 AM

Fascinating infographic: Very few people out of 100 have college degrees, but 60 out of 100 people are from Asia.  

Armando's curator insight, October 22, 6:20 AM
The World as 100 People | Visual.ly
Becky Roehrs's curator insight, October 23, 3:54 PM

If you want to see a detailed breakdown and find out where the data came from, here you go: http://www.100people.org/statistics_detailed_statistics.php

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Season of birth affects your mood later in life - Telegraph

Season of birth affects your mood later in life - Telegraph | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Scientists' research shows people born in the summer are more likely to suffer from mood swings
Helen Teague's insight:

Lead researcher, assistant professor Xenia Gonda, said: “Biochemical studies have shown that the season in which you are born has an influence on certain monoamine neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and serotonin, which is detectable even in adult life. This led us to believe that birth season may have a longer-lasting effect.

“Our work looked at over 400 subjects and matched their birth season to personality types in later life."

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The 7 Habits of Highly Influential CEOs

The 7 Habits of Highly Influential CEOs | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

As executive influence becomes more important, C-suite executives really do need to “be their brand.” To that end, being seen as an influential thought leader or opinion maker is vital for any CXO hoping to lead a competitive company in today’s world.

 

But how do you do that? We decided to look at people who are doing it successfully today, and reverse-engineer their secrets. We identified 7 important habits, the first 4 of which we’ll cover in today’s article. They are:

Own A TopicMake The Most of ControversyCorollary – Don’t Work in FinanceTweet Early, Tweet Often aka Publish or PerishKnow Your AudienceBe More Than A Brand ExtensionMake Yourself Accessible

 

So let’s see exactly who these influential leaders are....

 


Via Jeff Domansky
Helen Teague's insight:

As executive influence becomes more important, C-suite executives really do need to “be their brand.” To that end, being seen as an influential thought leader or opinion maker is vital for any CXO hoping to lead a competitive company in today’s world.

 

But how do you do that? We decided to look at people who are doing it successfully today, and reverse-engineer their secrets. We identified 7 important habits, the first 4 of which we’ll cover in today’s article. They are:

Own A TopicMake The Most of ControversyCorollary – Don’t Work in FinanceTweet Early, Tweet Often aka Publish or PerishKnow Your AudienceBe More Than A Brand ExtensionMake Yourself Accessible

 

So let’s see exactly who these influential leaders are....

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, September 23, 7:09 PM

Good look at thought leaders, how they do it and how they could do better.

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Position Available Immediately: Apprentice Sith Lord, Dark Side Consulting Group

Position Available Immediately: Apprentice Sith Lord, Dark Side Consulting Group | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Dr. Dan:  The connection to Knowledge Management?  All is revealed when you read the entire job posting!


Via Dr. Dan Kirsch
Helen Teague's insight:

Job opportunity or occupational sentence?

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Dr. Dan Kirsch's curator insight, September 3, 1:14 PM

This popped up in my KM daily feed, and so I simply had to pass it along!


Position Available Immediately: Apprentice Sith Lord, Dark Side Consulting Group

An unprecedented opening has occurred in the Dark Side Consulting Group for an Apprentice Sith Lord. The ideal candidate for this position would like galactic travel, and possess a complete understanding of and competence with the force, or demonstrate a willingness to learn.


Duties include: Performing competitive intelligence, hands-on
intervention in support of the Sith Master's planning initiatives,
ability to travel the galaxy widely, and operating a variety of
laser-powered hand weapons and high-powered space/air vehicles. Some slaying of enemies of the Dark Side is also required, though may be performed using the force, or hand weapons.

Qualified applicants would possess good communications skills
(especially when speaking in menacing whispers), and would be
action-oriented individuals and risk takers. A background in study of the force (light side or dark) is desirable, as would typically be acquired by those with advanced degrees or significant coursework in Jedi Arts from the University of Coruscant. Applicants should also be familiar with holographic projection equipment, possess a valid galactic pilot's license (for all classes of ships), and must show a willingness to give in to their hate.

A proven track record of using fear and/or jedi mind tricks to control others is also desirable, as is the ability to speak several galactic languages.

Ideal candidates for this position would also have no children, or
other living relatives who are strong in the ways of the force. (A new hire would be given several weeks to meet this requirement.) Compensation for this position is commensurate with experience, and is extremely competitive for this field. Benefits include a generous severance package, a company starship, and a dark-colored clothing allowance.

The Apprentice Sith Lord reports to and works closely with the Sith Master, and experience in such small, team-based organizations is vital to the success of the master's plans. Discretion is also highly valued, as is the ability to see the future before it happens.

Applications will be accepted until the end of June. Transmit them holographically to: jobs@darkside.com

*******************************************************************
Dark Side CG (tm) is a small and highly-focused organization, founded a long time ago. Our core values reflect the short-term advantages of harnessing hate for institutional power, and the long-term desirability of controlling the galaxy. We provide direction to our partner organizations through knowledge management, incident control and our rapid on-site intervention expertise. Our partnered organizations include the Imperial Senate, the Hutt Gambling Collective of Tattooine, and many large software companies.


(Source: http://rcaslis.xkill.net)

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27 Exquisite Places To See Brilliant Fall Colors This Year

27 Exquisite Places To See Brilliant Fall Colors This Year | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Fall is right around the corner and so are the colors!
Helen Teague's insight:

#exhale... :)

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Three Ways to Become More Mindful at Work - MediaJobsDaily

Three Ways to Become More Mindful at Work - MediaJobsDaily | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Three Ways to Become More Mindful at Work
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