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Rewire Your Brain for Positivity and Happiness Using the Tetris Effect

Rewire Your Brain for Positivity and Happiness Using the Tetris Effect | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Ever go through a phase where you feel like every day is a Monday? You wake up, you hit snooze. Then you hit snooze again and you just don't feel it? Why? In one study, people who did a "three good things" exercise for a week felt happier and less depressed after one month. The study then did the three-month and six-month follow-ups. Not surprisingly, the happiest participants were the ones who had continued the practice throughout.


Via Susan Gingras Fitzell
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Susan Gingras Fitzell's curator insight, March 6, 2013 12:35 PM

This is great information for those of us who struggle with staying positive and retraining our brains from negative patterns of thinking learned in childhood to where we want to be today. Rather than just say, "Think positive!" This article shares one way HOW and explains WHY it will work with scientific research.

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Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read - OEDB.org

Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read - OEDB.org | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Click above to view full image! Any book lover can tell you: diving into a great novel is an immersive experience that can make your brain come alive with imagery and emotions and even turn on your senses.

Via Anu Ojaranta
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sarah's curator insight, October 27, 2013 4:08 AM

intéressant

Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, October 27, 2013 1:07 PM

Educators have long told us that reading expands our minds. Here are some of the specific ways in which they do so.

Carol Rine's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:54 AM

This is a GREAT article that has lots of embedded cross-linked articles within it.  :O)

 

Carol

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Rewiring Your Emotions | Mindful

Rewiring Your Emotions | Mindful | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Think you're destined to respond the same way emotionally to the same old triggers? Not necessarily so, says Sharon Begley. With a little mind training, you can chart new pathways.
Helen Teague's insight:

the “cognitive brain” is also the “emotional brain.” As a result, activity in certain cognitive regions sends signals to the emotion-generating regions. So while you can’t just order yourself to have a particular feeling, you can sort of sneak up on your emotions via your thoughts.

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iPhone 5S

iPhone 5S | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
An iPhone 5S has 1,300 times more processing power than the computer that landed Apollo 11 on the moon.
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The Importance of Informal Learning Infographic - e-Learning Infographics

The Importance of Informal Learning Infographic - e-Learning Infographics | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
How much informal learning is occurring today and the impact it is having towards developing skills relevant to the workplace. Importance of Informal Learning!
Helen Teague's insight:

Informal learning is the unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way most people learn. It often takes the form of articles, videos, books, online courses, conferences, etc, as opposed to formal courses.

According to The Importance of Informal Learning Infographic, reliance on informal learning is growing because it promotes autonomy, efficiency, relevancy, flexibility, accessibility.

Nearly 9 in 10 people enjoy learning; over 50% of working professionals say they learn something from an article, video, or book everyday. Most working professionals spend between 1-30 min per day on informal learning.

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What (And Why) Do People Share On Social Networks? [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter

What (And Why) Do People Share On Social Networks? [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
What (And Why) Do People Share On Social Networks? [INFOGRAPHIC]
Helen Teague's insight:

photos lead the list!

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The Best Way to Change Your Habits? Control Your Environment

The Best Way to Change Your Habits? Control Your Environment | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
There’s just one way to radically change your behavior: radically change your environment. —Dr. B.J. Fogg, Director of Stanford Persuasive Lab Most of us would like to think that our habits follow our intentions. The truth is that one of the mind’s chief functions is to spot and utilize patterns as shortcuts, in order to

Via Barb Jemmott
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Lisa McCarthy's curator insight, July 17, 8:44 AM

Some very good advice for those of us who feel pulled in too many directions at once.

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The neuroscience of social intelligence: Bill von Hippel at TEDxUQ 2014 - YouTube

What is social intelligence? Psychology professor Bill von Hippel argues that the frontal lobes of the brain play a critical role in enabling socially intell...
Helen Teague's insight:

Social intelligence, Social IQ, and Social Knowledge are the same...it's all about the frontal lobe...

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What's Not Revealed is Often Most Revealing

What's Not Revealed is Often Most Revealing | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Become more deeply connected to diverse people in ways that support you both by recognizing what they aren't saying, "defensive driving" to avoid conversational crashes, and getting them to ask sequential questions that reveal their underlying...

Via Barb Jemmott
Helen Teague's insight:

from Barb Jemmott: " Become more deeply connected to diverse people in ways that support you both by recognizing what they aren't saying, "defensive driving" to avoid conversational crashes, and getting them to ask sequential questions that reveal their underlying..."

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Burnout: The Enemy of Sleep

Burnout: The Enemy of Sleep | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Arianna Huffington explains how banishing glowy devices and going to bed earlier lead to healthier work practices.

Via Barb Jemmott
Helen Teague's insight:

Practical advice in the bullet list... worth a try...I am clocking 3-4 hours now...thanks Barb Jemmott

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malek's curator insight, July 11, 4:25 AM

How we react to bad things is very dependent on how connected we are to our own strength and wisdom and peace and resilience. 

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Sprucing + Juicing. An ode to The Hiatus, and why I'm taking one (and you should too.) • Danielle LaPorte: white hot truth + sermons on life

Sprucing + Juicing. An ode to The Hiatus, and why I'm taking one (and you should too.) • Danielle LaPorte: white hot truth + sermons on life | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
You extend the life re-chargeable batteries if you let the battery drain completely before you re-charge it....When to Take A Hiatus and How to Make A Hiatus Extra Useful and Holy...Hiate. (I made that word up.) Hiate when you're pumped to jump. Let the pause be punctuated by excitement. Cleansing! Creating! Music always follows silence....
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Laugh Often to Live Well | Brain Blogger

Laugh Often to Live Well | Brain Blogger | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Via Jim Manske
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Bobby Dillard's curator insight, May 10, 1:54 PM

You have heard it time and again – laughter is the best medicine. Humor and mirth offer a multitude of preventive and healing effects and a new study is offering more evidence that laughter has quantifiable benefits for the brain.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 10, 5:42 PM

Children laugh up to 300 times a day and adults an average of 5 times a day. If school were fun and enjoyable for children and adults, perhaps we would laugh more.

Fatima Formariz's curator insight, May 23, 5:49 AM

Laughter has healing effects, easy medecine.

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Scared Of Failing? Ask Yourself These 6 Fear-Killing Questions

Scared Of Failing? Ask Yourself These 6 Fear-Killing Questions | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Warren Berger, author of A More Beautiful Question, collected the provocative questions top designers, tech innovators, and entrepreneurs ask...
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How Being Grateful Can Change Your Life

How Being Grateful Can Change Your Life | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

"It's not just for Oprah devotees. Recent studies show that practicing gratitude can positively impact your life--and researchers believe it may help.us break our bad habits."

 

YOU’RE HELPING OTHER PEOPLE.

Gratitude is about focusing on other people, says Dr. Jo-Ann Tsang, a psychology professor at Baylor University, who led a study which will appear in the July 2014 issue of the journal Personality and Individual Differences.

 

“Previous research that we and others have done finds that people are motivated to help people that help them--and to help others as well. We’re social creatures, and so focusing on others in a positive way is good for our health,” Tsang said in a statement.


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Nermeen Hassan's curator insight, April 23, 9:07 PM

Alhamdullah... many of my friends and students told me in the past few days, keep repeating their own gratitude mantra helps them a lot through out life ups and downs... mine is "Alhamdullah for opening my heart" or just simply  "Alhamdullah" = "Thank God"

Randy Bauer's curator insight, May 13, 6:33 PM

Gratitude is about giving back, or giving thanks, to someone. It is an action that has a positive reaction; Happiness and Well-Being.

Randy Bauer's comment, May 13, 6:35 PM
I was about ready to rescoop and low and behold it is @Bethany Spilde I Hope You ARE WELL
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Wisdom – a short guide

Wisdom – a short guide | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

It’s one of the grandest and oddest words out there, so lofty, it doesn’t sound like something one could ever consciously strive to be – unlike say, being cultured, or kind. Others could perhaps compliment you on being it, but it wouldn’t be something you could yourself ever announce you had become.


Via Barb Jemmott
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The Psychology of Motivation: How To Get Stuff Done, Even When You’re Not “On”

The Psychology of Motivation: How To Get Stuff Done, Even When You’re Not “On” | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Learn how to tap into the psychology of motivation to ride "motivation waves" and get more done every day.

Via Barb Jemmott
Helen Teague's insight:

Proactive ideas and  Solution thinking to  help people succeed on the most desirable behavior that matches their current situational motivation   also included is the YouTube video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fqUSjHjIEFg

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Coloured X-rays of animals and plants - in pictures

Coloured X-rays of animals and plants - in pictures | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Dutch physicist Arie van't Riet has created an extraordinary collection of artwork using coloured X-rays of flora and fauna
Helen Teague's insight:

beautifully eerie

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5 Reasons to Go Back to College After 50

5 Reasons to Go Back to College After 50 | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Getting a college degree after 50 can pay off professionally and personally in a vareity of ways.
Helen Teague's insight:

5 reasons from the post for going back to college for a degree after 50:
1. A sense of accomplishment
2. Better job prospects In June 2014, the unemployment rate for adults with a bachelor’s degree or higher was 3.3 percent. But for high school graduates with no college, it was 5.8 percent; for those with some college or an associate degree, the rate was 5.0 percent.
3. Personal growth
4. A great way to keep busy
5. A way to contribute to society

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The Brain Is Not Computable: Why Singularity Will Not Happen and Humans Will Assimilate Machines

The Brain Is Not Computable: Why Singularity Will Not Happen and Humans Will Assimilate Machines | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
A leading neuroscientist says Kurzweil’s Singularity isn’t going to happen. Instead, humans will assimilate machines.

 

Miguel Nicolelis, a top neuroscientist at Duke University, says computers will never replicate the human brain and that the technological Singularity is “a bunch of hot air.”

 

“The brain is not computable and no engineering can reproduce it,” says Nicolelis, author of several pioneering papers on brain-machine interfaces.

 

The Singularity, of course, is that moment when a computer super-intelligence emerges and changes the world in ways beyond our comprehension.

 

Among the idea’s promoters are futurist Ray Kurzweil, recently hired on at Google as a director of engineering, who has been predicting that not only will machine intelligence exceed our own, but people will be able to download their thoughts and memories into computers (see “Ray Kurzweil Plans to Create a Mind at Google—and Have It Serve You”). 

 

Nicolelis calls that idea sheer bunk. “Downloads will never happen,” he said during remarks made at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston on Sunday. “There are a lot of people selling the idea that you can mimic the brain with a computer.”

 

The debate over whether the brain is a kind of computer has been running for decades. Many scientists think it’s possible, in theory, for a computer to equal the brain given sufficient computer power and an understanding of how the brain works.

 

Kurzweil delves into the idea of “reverse-engineering” the brain in his latest book, How to Create a Mind: The Secret of Human Thought Revealed, in which he says even though the brain may be immensely complex, “the fact that it contains many billions of cells and trillions of connections does not necessarily make its primary method complex.”

 

But Nicolelis is in a camp that thinks that human consciousness (and if you believe in it, the soul) simply can’t be replicated in silicon. That’s because its most important features are the result of unpredictable, nonlinear interactions among billions of cells, Nicolelis says.

 

“You can’t predict whether the stock market will go up or down because you can’t compute it,” he says. “You could have all the computer chips ever in the world and you won’t create a consciousness.”

 

The neuroscientist, originally from Brazil, instead thinks that humans will increasingly subsume machines (an idea, incidentally, that’s also part of Kurzweil’s predictions).

 

In a study published last week, for instance, Nicolelis’s group at Duke used brain implants to allow mice to sense infrared light, something mammals can’t normally perceive. They did it by wiring a head-mounted infrared sensor to electrodes implanted into a part of the brain called the somatosensory cortex.

 

The experiment, in which several mice were able to follow sensory cues from the infrared detector to obtain a reward, was the first ever to use a neural implant to add a new sense to an animal, Nicolelis says.  


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Helen Teague's insight:

Extremely timely and worth the time to read...unpredictability and spontaneous is difficult to engineer

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Bernhard H. Schmitz's comment, July 16, 11:33 AM
I agree that too many people think it would be sufficient to plug a bunch of neurons together and consciousness will happen. Ridiculous. But I am convinced that it is not necessary to simulate a brain or reverse engineer it. Brains are developed by random incidents and evolution - and it's a mess. I am strongly convinced that a conscious mechanism will be developed from scratch. And it will outwit us.
Bernhard H. Schmitz's curator insight, July 16, 11:37 AM

I agree that too many people think it would be sufficient to plug a bunch of neurons together and consciousness will happen. Ridiculous. But I am convinced that it is not necessary to simulate a brain or reverse engineer it. Brains are developed by random incidents and evolution - and it's a mess. I am strongly convinced that a conscious mechanism will be developed from scratch. And it will outwit us.

Marco Bertolini's comment, July 16, 11:52 PM
@ Bernard Schmitz : I think you have a point there and I like the verty elegant way you put it : a conscious mecanism coming out from the chaos.
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3 Ways to Use ThingLink for Video in the Classroom

3 Ways to Use ThingLink for Video in the Classroom | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Recently ThingLink introduced ThingLink for Video, an exciting new editor for annotating video content with rich media.

Via Beth Dichter
Helen Teague's insight:

This post also discusses the Flipped Classroom model.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 14, 4:07 PM

With ThingLink for Video now available you might be wondering what you could do with it. Find examples of:

* How to Kick off a Unit and Target Instructional Goals

* Prepare a Flipped Lesson to Prepare Students for Work in Class

* Using ThingLink for Video for Professional Development

* 12 Examples Created by Teachers

* plus a How To Video to help you create your own

ThingLink has developed a resource that may become a staple in your classroom. If you do not yet have an account, go create one at the ThingLink website and you should be up and running pretty quickly.

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10 Things You Didn’t Know About Decision Making

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Decision Making | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
We make hundreds, maybe thousands, of decisions everyday. From the minuscule to the huge. From “Do I wear green socks or blue?” to “Do I really need to buy that car?

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Stand Up To Tackle Abstract Problems, Sit to Work on Practical Matters

Stand Up To Tackle Abstract Problems, Sit to Work on Practical Matters | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
You may be able to work on abstract problems better if you stand up, but sit down when it's time to roll up your sleeves. A series of studies found that your elevation has an impact on your mindset and how you tackle problems.

Via Barb Jemmott
Helen Teague's insight:

thanks to Barb Jemmott for curating this post

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Take Another Look – How Your Perception Is Changing Your World

Take Another Look – How Your Perception Is Changing Your World | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

We need to understand the way our perception shapes our world, this article gives some insight into how our perception can be changed


Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, July 6, 2:14 AM

There are no 'truths', only perceptions. Reframe your perception, change your mindset, the world my colour differently!

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 6, 10:10 AM

Perceptions are continuously changing which suggests the world is continuously changing.

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Five Communication Traits That Turn People Off

Five Communication Traits That Turn People Off | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
We all fall victim to expressing ourselves in ways that alienate the very people we're trying to impress. Here are five annoying communication traits to avoid.

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How the Brain Learns—A Super Simple Explanation

How the Brain Learns—A Super Simple Explanation | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
eLearning professionals should learn more about the biological basis of learning. Check out this simple explanation.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 24, 7:53 AM

Are you looking for a simple explanation on how learning happens in the brain? The infographic above shows the shorthand version and a more detailed version is available in the post. Although this post is geared to e-learning the four processes that take place are also found in the traditional (and the blended) classroom.

Process 1: Getting the information which takes place in the sensory cortices. This is the time to touch as many of the senses as possible. Try to create lessons when introducing new material that include audio, visual and kinesthetic experiences.

Process 2: Make meaning which takes place in the temporal lobe. To make meaning of new information we must provide time for reflection.

Process 3: Form abstractions which takes place in the prefrontal lobe. The learner has received new information, reflected on the information and now begins to make meaning in their brain by making relationships, forming abstractions and creating new knowledge.

Process 4: Active testing which takes place in the motor cortex. The abstract becomes active, providing guides for future learning.

You will also find a link on this page which will allow you to download an eBook - Neuroscience Based eLearning Tips.

Chris Carter's curator insight, June 24, 4:35 PM

This is your brain ... this is your brain when it learns.

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Find Your Passion With These 8 Thought-Provoking Questions

Find Your Passion With These 8 Thought-Provoking Questions | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

"Warren Berger, author of A More Beautiful Question, collected the provocative questions top designers, tech innovators, and entrepreneurs ask themselves about creativity."

 

In a previous post, I shared questions that can help in overcoming fear of failure. But sometimes, there’s an even more basic problem that can stop us from pursuing bold challenges and ambitious goals: not knowing which challenges or goals to pursue. These days, you're urged to “follow your passions” and “lean in”--but what if you’re not sure where your particular passion lies? What if you don’t know which way to lean?

 

The following is the second in a three-part series of posts adapted from Warren Berger’s new book,A More Beautiful Question(Bloomsbury), for which he spoke with top designers, tech innovators, entrepreneurs, and leading creative thinkers to explore the art (and innovative potential) of asking the right questions.

 


Via PAT NOVAK
Helen Teague's insight:

What is Your Tennis Ball?

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The Psychological Benefits of Writing: Why Richard Branson and Warren Buffett Write Regularly

The Psychological Benefits of Writing: Why Richard Branson and Warren Buffett Write Regularly | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Writing is thought put to page, which makes all of us writers -- even if we don’t have the chops to spin beautiful prose.

Via Alessandro Rea
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MM Jaye's curator insight, June 20, 11:11 PM

Interesting and motivating!

Snapshotic's curator insight, June 22, 2:21 AM

In addition to academic writing I find autobiographical  writing quite cathartic...

Jim Doyle's curator insight, June 23, 5:54 AM

The Psychological Benefits of Writing: Why Richard Branson and Warren Buffett Write Regularly