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The top 20 data visualisation tools via @gconole

The top 20 data visualisation tools via @gconole | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

From simple charts to complex maps and infographics, Brian Suda's round-up of the best – and mostly free – tools has everything you need to bring your data to life...

A common question is how to get started with data visualisations. Beyond following blogs, you need to practice – and to practice, you need to understand the tools available. In this article, get introduced to 20 different tools for creating visualisations...


Via Lauren Moss, Baiba Svenca, Jenny Pesina, João Greno Brogueira, Louise Robinson-Lay, Luciana Viter, Maria Margarida Correia, juandoming, Paula Barroca, R.Conrath, Ed.D., Amanda McAndrew, Dennis A. Fahey
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Randy Rebman's curator insight, January 28, 2013 12:33 PM

This looks like it might be a good source for integrating infographics into the classroom.

National Microscope Exchange's comment, February 18, 2015 12:00 AM
Superb Article
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Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read - OEDB.org

Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read - OEDB.org | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Click above to view full image! Any book lover can tell you: diving into a great novel is an immersive experience that can make your brain come alive with imagery and emotions and even turn on your senses.

Via Anu Ojaranta
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sarah's curator insight, October 27, 2013 7:08 AM

intéressant

Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, October 27, 2013 4:07 PM

Educators have long told us that reading expands our minds. Here are some of the specific ways in which they do so.

Carol Rine's curator insight, October 29, 2013 7:54 AM

This is a GREAT article that has lots of embedded cross-linked articles within it.  :O)

 

Carol

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Two Signs of Overwriting and Why It’s a Problem

Two Signs of Overwriting and Why It’s a Problem | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Often, when I read a submission from a newer writer or one who has just come out of a fiction class, I flag it for overwriting. What is overwriting? Basically, it’s a sense that the prose (and the writer behind it) is trying too hard to get their point across or impress the reader. Sometimes I wonder if people who overwrite are trying to live up to some idea of “fiction writer” that exists in their heads…a scribe who uses $10 words and milks every image and otherwise packs every sentence until it’s dragging and bloated. They want to make sure we get they’re a real writer. Sometimes this process is at the front of their mind, sometimes it happens without them realizing. 


Via Sharon Bakar
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Sharon Bakar's curator insight, January 22, 10:22 AM

Very useful post on overwriting - what it is and how to prevent it.

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Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators

Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
The psychological origins of waiting (... and waiting, and waiting) to work

Via Sharon Bakar
Helen Teague's insight:

"Forced into a challenge we're not prepared for, we often engage 'self-handicapping': deliberately doing things that set us up for failure." By

Megan McArdle

 

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Penelope's curator insight, February 3, 8:52 PM

 

There are several theories espoused in this article. One is that procrastinating writers were the best English students. That isn't my problem, since I barely eked out a "C."

 

“Work finally begins,” says Alain de Botton, “when the fear of doing nothing exceeds the fear of doing it badly.”

 

At least we writers know we're in the majority when we head to the refrigerator instead of writing.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/02/why-writers-are-the-worst-procrastinators/283773/

Chris Simon's curator insight, February 4, 4:01 AM

Non, vous n'êtes pas le seul à procrastiner ! ;-)

Sara Rosett's curator insight, February 4, 11:15 AM

Sara's thoughts:  really interesting article on mindset and how it impacts work.

#tw

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The Classroom Is Dead — Bright — Medium

The Classroom Is Dead - Bright - Medium

For generations, thinkers have attempted to reimagine the classroom, to improve the classroom, and, of course, to disrupt the classroom, and where has all that gotten us?


Via Nik Peachey
Helen Teague's insight:

True learning happens when we least expect it, when we aren’t even attempting it. What is the opposite of school? Recess, of course. We must use the bricks and boards of the deconstructed classroom to erect a playground in its place, a fantasia of slides and forts and swings.

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Eduard Lorda's curator insight, January 28, 4:07 AM

#novaeducacio

 

Frances's curator insight, February 1, 9:50 AM

Crazy? Brilliant? Off Base? Possible? How do you judge new ideas about learning?

Marinhos's curator insight, February 6, 5:38 AM

Mais uma vez anunciam a morte da sala de aula. Temo que ela permaneça viva - e por muito tempo - pois continuamos a formar professores que a alimentam. Se as licenciaturas mudarem, haverá uma chance de mudarmos a escola, ainda que ela tenha sala de aulas. Se as licenciaturas permanecerem no passado, não haverá um outro futuro para a escola.

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America’s Oldest–And Most Adorable–Teacher Turns 102 Today, in Classroom Where She’s Happiest - Good News Network

America’s Oldest–And Most Adorable–Teacher Turns 102 Today, in Classroom Where She’s Happiest - Good News Network | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Doctors told her she has the heart a 40-year-old woman, but America’s oldest teacher is as happy as a teenager. “Granny”–as she is called-turns 102 today.
Helen Teague's insight:

Three cheers for New Jersey's Agnes Zhelesnik!

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Red wine is bad for you, say experts

Red wine is bad for you, say experts | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Government experts dismiss supposed health benefits of wine and are set to
rewrite the rule book on alcohol consumption
Helen Teague's insight:

A recent study by University College London found patients who gave up drinking alcohol for four weeks saw benefits for their liver function, blood pressure and cholesterol levels and were also at lower risk of developing diabetes and liver disease. The British Government currently advises men do not drink more than three to four units per day - up to 21 units or less per week - while women should drink no more than two to three units a day, or 14 units per week.

Under the new guidelines the gender difference will be thrown out and drinkers will be to keep off the booze for at least two days a week in order to allow their livers to recover.

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8 Holiday Movie Locations You Can Visit in Real Life

8 Holiday Movie Locations You Can Visit in Real Life | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
There's something magical about the holiday season to begin with…but add in a dash of movie magic at these real-life film locations, and, well, you're just in yuletide heaven.
Helen Teague's insight:
Season's Greetings!!
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Hybrid Pedagogy’s 2015 List of Lists

Hybrid Pedagogy’s 2015 List of Lists | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
These articles most warrant additional (or renewed) attention, reflecting the most active conversations in 2015 from the Hybrid Pedagogy community.
Helen Teague's insight:

Timely Go-To list for reference

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Window of insight

Window of insight | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
I was co-facilitating a coach training workshop for leaders last week. Sun was streaming in through the windows and I was thinking about how to illustrate the concept of psychological filters and...
Helen Teague's insight:

By Nick Wright~~~"As leaders, coaches and facilitators, we can grow in awareness of our own filters and their potentially distorting effects. We can learn to notice when we are projecting or transferring onto people and experiences. We can grow in awareness of our cultural beliefs and how they shape what we perceive and what we value. We can grow in awareness of our emotional states – what triggers them and how to handle them in the moment. ...  We can enable others to grow in awareness too, thereby broadening the range of possibilities, of options, available to them – and to us."

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Burnout: Is it Real? If Yes, Can it Be Codified?

Burnout: Is it Real? If Yes, Can it Be Codified? | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

From MedPage Today who surveyed a sample of health care professionals and asked them to choose among 10 factors contributing to professional burnout, the No. 1 rated factor, cited by 26% of respondents, was "loss of autonomy and control over content of clinical work."

 

Helen Teague's insight:

Post by by J. Duncan Moore, Jr.

Mayo Clinic researchers found,

Physicians were at higher risk for emotional exhaustion (32.1% versus 23.5%)Physicians have a higher level of depersonalization (19.4% versus 15.0%)Physicians are at higher risk for overall burnout (37.9% versus 27.8%)Physicians worked 10 hours more per week on average than the general population (50 hours versus 40 hours)

In 2012, the AMA commissioned an exhaustive research study by the RAND Corp. to look at all the factors that influence physician professional satisfaction, and identify potential targets for interventions to improve it. The RAND study examined "dissatisfiers and satisfiers" that physicians found in practice. The most important "satisfier," Madara reported, was "having enough face time one-on-one with patients."

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What Technology Will Look Like In Five Years

What Technology Will Look Like In Five Years | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Rather than gauging if the toilet has enough water, the soap bottle is full enough and the lights are the perfect level, your smart bathroom can ask, “How was your visit?” You can say “Good,” or perhaps, “Bad — there wasn’t enough soap.” This eliminates the need for so much tracking, and makes the experience feel more human. Ultimately, our devices will rely on our feedback just as much as data.

Via Nik Peachey
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johanna krijnsen's curator insight, November 21, 2015 6:15 AM

curious what kind of an impact this will have on schools & education?

Chantal M. Simonelli's curator insight, November 30, 2015 1:06 PM

Wow.  exciting....and a bit scary!

Stuart Goode's curator insight, December 18, 2015 3:13 PM

Is this the way forward for Trip Advisor

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Why Teams Don’t Work

Why Teams Don’t Work | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
A leading organizational psychologist explains the five critical conditions that make the difference between success and failure.
Helen Teague's insight:

This post is by Diane Coutu. It kinda verifies some cautions I have with teams and the rather dismissive way that they ostracize team members who are not "team players."  J. Richard Hackman, the Edgar Pierce Professor of Social and Organizational Psychology at Harvard University and a leading expert on teams has conducted research whose finding suggest that, "problems with coordination and motivation typically chip away at the benefits of collaboration. And even when you have a strong and cohesive team, it’s often in competition with other teams, and that dynamic can also get in the way of real progress."  And... "If the leader isn’t disciplined about managing who is on the team and how it is set up, the odds are slim that a team will do a good job."

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Learning as Weaving - Hybrid Pedagogy

Learning as Weaving - Hybrid Pedagogy | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
As educators, we want to teach in ways that support our students to be the best that they can be. We yearn for the lightbulb moment.
Helen Teague's insight:

"...in the contemporary, connected world the ability to stand out from the crowd is becoming more and more difficult. We want our students to stand on the shoulders of giants, but that model is pretty unsteady. Maybe the key is to teach them to collaborate — to weave a web, strong, networked, and expansive. Perfect for catching the elusive creature that is new knowledge."

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A little known hack from Japan to get your notebook organized

A little known hack from Japan to get your notebook organized | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

th February 2015 by Adam 120 Comments

Tools like Evernote make organizing and finding information really simple. Yet despite that, I still often find myself using the humble notebook to jot down valuable ideas, especially when I’m on the go.

However notebooks are hard to organize your ideas. You either split your notebook into several sections for each ‘category’ and end up wasting valuable pages in the quieter sections or you just write your ideas as they come along making them hard to find

later on.


Via Sharon Bakar
Helen Teague's insight:

I am using this method for my dissertation notes...

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Sharon Bakar's curator insight, January 19, 4:14 AM

Good advice for organizing your writing notebook too.

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The Myers-Briggs Types of 202 Fictional Characters

The Myers-Briggs Types of 202 Fictional Characters | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
The Myers-Briggs personality types of 202 literary characters.

Via Sharon Bakar
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Sharon Bakar's curator insight, January 28, 10:21 PM

Where would your characters fit in?

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7 Mind-Blowing Facts About The Universe To Put Your Ego In Check

7 Mind-Blowing Facts About The Universe To Put Your Ego In Check | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
It's time for a little perspective.
Helen Teague's insight:

If the sun were as tall as a typical front door, Earth would be the size of a nickel. Post by Chris D'Angelo

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4,000 jobs to go in Pearson shake-up - BBC News

4,000 jobs to go in Pearson shake-up - BBC News | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Education publisher Pearson says it is to shed 10% of its worldwide workforce in an effort to cuts costs.
Helen Teague's insight:

Similar content appearing in WSJ and NYT

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One little change in how you talk to your kids can help them be more successful.

One little change in how you talk to your kids can help them be more successful. | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

king fIt's so simple, but a lot of people have no idea it's even a thing.

Helen Teague's insight:

Speaking to kids with a growth mindset emphasis. 

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Digital eye strain worse for multitaskers, survey finds

Digital eye strain worse for multitaskers, survey finds | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Three-quarters of people who use two or more devices simultaneously report symptoms of digital eye strain, compared with just over half who use one device at a time.
Helen Teague's insight:

Post by Alexia Elejalde-Ruiz points to current research on the effects of looking/staring at many types of mobile devices and stationary hardware

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What Level of Teaching is Right for Me?

What Level of Teaching is Right for Me? | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Monday mornings, I welcome my 6th-grade homeroom, then immediately turn around and teach 12th-grade “higher-level” mathematics.
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LinkedIn Top Voices: Education

LinkedIn Top Voices: Education | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Meet the top 10 education and student writers of the year on LinkedIn,
ranked by engagement and more. Read — and follow — them now.
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A Visual on Building Excellence

A Visual on Building Excellence | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
Helen Teague's insight:

love this!

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 12, 2015 10:36 PM

Check out this visual using the quote "Excellence is not a skill. It is an attitude." Consider printing out a copy and putting on the wall, reminding students that with time and effort they will improve!

Viljenka Savli (http://www2.arnes.si/~sopvsavl/)'s curator insight, April 13, 2015 3:23 AM

and it's an important one ...

Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, April 13, 2015 5:38 AM

This is worth sharing. Attitudes of learning.

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Moderate Coffee Drinking May Prevent Early Death

Moderate Coffee Drinking May Prevent Early Death | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Host of risks reduced in those drinking up to five cups per day
Helen Teague's insight:
by Kathryn Doyle~~~"There is no evidence of harm of regular consumption in terms of chronic disease risk or mortality, and consistent evidence that consumption of coffee reduces the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease," said Dr. Frank Hu, of Harvard School of Public Health.

(Go Java! Go Java!)

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NIST team proves entanglement is really real

NIST team proves entanglement is really real | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Einstein was wrong about at least one thing: There are, in fact, "spooky actions at a distance," as now proven by researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

 

Einstein used that term to refer to quantum mechanics, which describes the curious behavior of the smallest particles of matter and light. He was referring, specifically, to entanglement, the idea that two physically separated particles can have correlated properties, with values that are uncertain until they are measured. Einstein was dubious, and until now, researchers have been unable to support it with near-total confidence.


As described in a paper posted online and submitted to Physical Review Letters (PRL), researchers from NIST and several other institutions created pairs of identical light particles, or photons, and sent them to two different locations to be measured. Researchers showed the measured results not only were correlated, but also—by eliminating all other known options—that these correlations cannot be caused by the locally controlled, "realistic" universe Einstein thought we lived in. This implies a different explanation such as entanglement.


The NIST experiments are called Bell tests, so named because in 1964 Irish physicist John Bell showed there are limits to measurement correlations that can be ascribed to local, pre-existing (i.e. realistic) conditions. Additional correlations beyond those limits would require either sending signals faster than the speed of light, which scientists consider impossible, or another mechanism, such as quantum entanglement.


The NIST results are more definitive than those reported recently by researchers at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands.

In the NIST experiment, the photon source and the two detectors were located in three different, widely separated rooms on the same floor in a large laboratory building. The two detectors are 184 meters apart, and 126 and 132 meters, respectively, from the photon source.


The source creates a stream of photon pairs through a common process in which a laser beam stimulates a special type of crystal. This process is generally presumed to create pairs of photons that are entangled, so that the photons' polarizations are highly correlated with one another. Polarization refers to the specific orientation of the photon, like vertical or horizontal (polarizing sunglasses preferentially block horizontally polarized light), analogous to the two sides of a coin.


Photon pairs are then separated and sent by fiber-optic cable to separate detectors in the distant rooms. While the photons are in flight, a random number generator picks one of two polarization settings for each polarization analyzer. If the photon matched the analyzer setting, then it was detected more than 90 percent of the time.


In the best experimental run, both detectors simultaneously identified photons a total of 6,378 times over a period of 30 minutes. Other outcomes (such as just one detector firing) accounted for only 5,749 of the 12,127 total relevant events. Researchers calculated that the maximum chance of local realism producing these results is just 0.0000000059, or about 1 in 170 million. This outcome exceeds the particle physics community's requirement for a "5 sigma" result needed to declare something a discovery. The results strongly rule out local realistic theories, suggesting that the quantum mechanical explanation of entanglement is indeed the correct explanation.


The NIST experiment closed the three major loopholes as follows:


Fair sampling: Thanks to NIST's single-photon detectors, the experiment was efficient enough to ensure that the detected photons and measurement results were representative of the actual totals. The detectors, made of superconducting nanowires, were 90 percent efficient, and total system efficiency was about 75 percent.


No faster-than-light communication: The two detectors measured photons from the same pair a few hundreds of nanoseconds apart, finishing more than 40 nanoseconds before any light-speed communication could take place between the detectors. Information traveling at the speed of light would require 617 nanoseconds to travel between the detectors.


Freedom of choice: Detector settings were chosen by random number generators operating outside the light cone (i.e., possible influence) of the photon source, and thus, were free from manipulation. In fact, the experiment demonstrated a "Bell violation machine" that NIST eventually plans to use to certify randomness.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Helen Teague's insight:

The implication of "a different explanation such as entanglement."

Very real.

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Normal-Weight Central Obesity: Implications for Total and Cardiovascular MortalityMortality Risk in Persons With Normal-Weight Central Obesity | Annals of Internal Medicine

Normal-Weight Central Obesity: Implications for Total and Cardiovascular MortalityMortality Risk in Persons With Normal-Weight Central Obesity | Annals of Internal Medicine | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Helen Teague's insight:
Does Big Belly Beat BMI as Early Death Predictor? A study by F. Perry Wilson, MD

Hint: DO sit-ups!!

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Soda and junk foods are not making you fat

Soda and junk foods are not making you fat | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Americans are consuming more calories than they did in the 1970s.
Helen Teague's insight:

Americans are consuming about 500 more calories than in the 1970's...French fries are the worst culprit...

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