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Reform the School Day to Reform Schools

Reform the School Day to Reform Schools | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Schools and children are dictated by the bell schedule. Classes are 57 minutes, except for math and English, which are 87 minutes, because they're tested at the end of the year.

Unless we can break the cycles that drive our schools and really model the real world, we cannot have meaningful reform. Ask any professional. Their days do not come in neat chunks of time. - Brian Bennett

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Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read - OEDB.org

Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read - OEDB.org | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Click above to view full image! Any book lover can tell you: diving into a great novel is an immersive experience that can make your brain come alive with imagery and emotions and even turn on your senses.

Via Anu Ojaranta
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sarah's curator insight, October 27, 2013 7:08 AM

intéressant

Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, October 27, 2013 4:07 PM

Educators have long told us that reading expands our minds. Here are some of the specific ways in which they do so.

Carol Rine's curator insight, October 29, 2013 7:54 AM

This is a GREAT article that has lots of embedded cross-linked articles within it.  :O)

 

Carol

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The Psychological Price of Entrepreneurship

The Psychological Price of Entrepreneurship | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
No one said building a company was easy. But it's time to be honest about how brutal it really is--and the price so many founders secretly pay.
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9 Things People Just Don't Get About Entrepreneurs

9 Things People Just Don't Get About Entrepreneurs | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Entrepreneurs do what they do for reasons most people will never understand--unless they're also entrepreneurs.
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How to Deal With Crappy People

How to Deal With Crappy People | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Ugh, I’m disgusted with my brain. I see people walking down the street and there’s like this killer inside me providing running nasty commentary about each person. Do you do this also?I have to stop
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50 things you don’t need to do anymore — Thanks to Technology!

50 things you don’t need to do anymore — Thanks to Technology! | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Via Barb Jemmott
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How Selecting the Best Mentors Will Stimulate Thinking and Learning

How Selecting the Best Mentors Will Stimulate Thinking and Learning | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
I like to read … why? To be entertained, learn new things, and stimulate thinking. Both Seth Godin and Tom Peters are silent mentors that are my favorites.
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162 Future Jobs: Preparing for Jobs that Don’t Yet Exist

162 Future Jobs: Preparing for Jobs that Don’t Yet Exist | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

A recent article in The Economist quotes Bill Gates as saying at least a dozen job types will be taken over by robots and automation in the next two decades, and these jobs cover both high-paying and low-skilled workers. Some of the positions he mentioned were commercial pilots, legal work, technical writing, telemarketers, accountants, retail workers, and real estate sales agents.

 

Indeed, as I’ve predicted before, by 2030 over 2 billion jobs will disappear. Again, this is not a doom and gloom prediction, rather a wakeup call for the world.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Ray Fowler's curator insight, April 1, 6:14 AM

Reading through this for the second time I realised that so many of these were closer that we realise. The role of Supply Chain Optimiser I think is already upon us. But I want to be a Clone Rancher.

Takudzwa Kunaka's curator insight, April 2, 7:42 AM
that is the decade of digital age
Cas Op de Beek's curator insight, April 11, 5:50 AM

First there came the computer and brought us more jobs and now comes more jobs and more. Technology brings us a lot more than only freedom he brings us more jobs as well. One small step for men but a big step for the future. 

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6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns

6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

"When you’re standing in front of a classroom of students who’re not quite sure they even want to be in your class, much less pay attention to what’s being said, things like neuroscience, research studies, and teaching the way the brain learns are an abstraction.

Yet, brain-targeted teaching can engage and excite students because it taps into factors that stimulate the brain, grab the attention, and set the stage for learning."


Via Beth Dichter
Helen Teague's insight:
strong>Referencing Beth Dichter's insight:What if we were able to design our curriculum to support the way the brain learns? Would our students be more engaged in class? Learn about this new model, Teach the Way the Brain Learns, in this post. There is a short discussion about some of the concepts as well as six brain targets, each of which includes a brief neuroscience explanation as well as a "translation" so that you will understand how to implement each target in your classroom. What are some of the targets? Brain Target 1: Establish the emotional climate for learning What does this mean? "Stress impedes learning." Make connections with students and then begin the lesson. Brain Target 2: Creating the Physical Learning Environment What does this mean? The physical space impacts our students. Changing the space may help them learn. What changes could you make in your classroom? Four additional brain targets are provided. You may also want to check out the website Brain Targeted Teaching (http://www.braintargetedteaching.org/) where you will find additional information as well as sample units that utilize this method (and a template to create your own lessons).
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 18, 10:13 PM

What if we were able to design our curriculum to support the way the brain learns? Would our students be more engaged in class? Learn about this new model, Teach the Way the Brain Learns, in this post. There is a short discussion about some of the concepts as well as six brain targets, each of which includes a brief neuroscience explanation as well as a "translation" so that you will understand how to implement each target in your classroom.

What are some of the targets?

Brain Target 1: Establish the emotional climate for learning

What does this mean? "Stress impedes learning." Make connections with students and then begin the lesson.

Brain Target 2: Creating the Physical Learning Environment

What does this mean? The physical space impacts our students. Changing the space may help them learn. What changes could you make in your classroom?

Four additional brain targets are provided. You may also want to check out the website Brain Targeted Teaching (http://www.braintargetedteaching.org/) where you will find additional information as well as sample units that utilize this method (and a template to create your own lessons).

Nicole Wallace's curator insight, March 19, 12:57 AM

Great comments in here and how it links to neurobiology.

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Why Creative Collaboration Is a Solution for Tough Business Problems

Why Creative Collaboration Is a Solution for Tough Business Problems | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Have you tried a brainstorming session with your team to create solution ideas? Brainstorming is a great way to jumpstart the team’s creative collaboration.
Helen Teague's insight:

speaks to the power of synergy

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Visual Storytelling: Why Data Visualization is a Content Marketing Fairytale - Search Engine Journal

Visual Storytelling: Why Data Visualization is a Content Marketing Fairytale - Search Engine Journal | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
To make your Content Marketing work stand out you need to combine visual elements through storytelling. Read to learn more on data visualization.
Helen Teague's insight:

I like Ally Greer's insight:

 

It's true that the human brain favors visual content because it's easier to process and understand. According to this post, readers will only actually read 28% of the words on a page. Why create so much if it might not even be read?

 

 

 

Keeping this in mind for content marketing can lead to some great visual storytelling - this piece explains some of the steps to building the perfect story to keep the brains of your audience engaged for an optimal amount of time.

 

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You'd think it's just a guy randomly walking in the snow, but look from above and... WOW!

You'd think it's just a guy randomly walking in the snow, but look from above and... WOW! | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

You probably never heard of Simon Beck before, but after seeing what he's able to create just walking for ours on the snow, his name will probably be imprinted in your memory forever. 


Via Barb Jemmott
Helen Teague's insight:
talk about walking 10 miles in the the snow!
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Answering Work Emails at Night Makes You a Worse Employee in the Morning

Answering Work Emails at Night Makes You a Worse Employee in the Morning | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

We know that looking at smartphones or laptops before bed can disrupt sleep, but did you know that it can also leave you unable to focus the next day?


Via Barb Jemmott
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Prions Are Key to Preserving Long-Term Memories

Prions Are Key to Preserving Long-Term Memories | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

The famed protein chain reaction that made mad cow disease a terror may be involved in helping to ensure that our recollections don't fade.

 

Prions are proteins with two unusual properties: First, they can switch between two possible shapes, one that is stable on its own and an alternate conformation that can form chains. Second, the chain-forming version has to be able to trigger others to change shape and join the chain. Say that in the normal version the protein is folded so that one portion of the protein structure—call it "tab A"—fits into its own "slot B." In the alternate form, though, tab A is available to fit into its neighbor's slot B. That means the neighbor can do the same thing to the next protein to come along, forming a chain or clump that can grow indefinitely.

 

For a brain cell, keeping a memory around is a lot of work. A variety of proteins need to be continually manufactured at the synapse, the small gap that interfaces one cell to another. But whereas a cell may have a multitude of synapses, the protein synthesis that grows and maintains the connection only occurs at specific ones that have been activated. Work in the sea slug Aplysia (a favorite of neuroscientists because of its large cells) showed that a protein called CPEB, for cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding, is necessary to keep a synapse activated. CPEB acts as a prion.

 

Once the prion's chain reaction gets started it's self-perpetuating, and thus the synapse can be maintained after the initial trigger is gone—perhaps for a lifetime. But that still doesn't explain how the first prion is triggered or why it only happens in certain synapses and not others.

 

An answer comes from Si's work on fruit flies, published February 11 in PLoS Biology. Sex—and, in particular, male courtship behavior—is an ideal realm in which to test memory: If a female is unreceptive, the male will remember this and stop trying to court her. Earlier, Si’s team showed that if the fly's version of CPEB, called Orb2, is mutated so that it cannot act as a prion, the insect briefly remembers that the female is unreceptive but that memory fades over the course of a few days.

 

Now, Si's team has figured out how the cell turns on the machinery responsible for the persistence of memory—and how the memory can be stabilized at just the right time and in the right place.

 

Before the memory is formed a fly's neuron is full of a version of the prion called Orb2B. Although this version can switch shapes to form prions' characteristic clumps, it can't get started without the related protein Orb2A. In this week's paper Si and colleagues untangled the multipartnered dance that controls Orb2A's role. First, a protein called TOB binds to Orb2A, allowing it to persist intact in the cell. (Normally, it would be broken down within a few hours.) Once stabilized it needs to have a phosphate tag attached, and this is done by another protein called Lim kinase.

 

Crucially, Lim kinase is only activated when the cell receives an electrical impulse—and only targeted at that synapse, not any other synaptic connections the cell might also be making. That means that the prion chain reaction is turned on in the specific time and place it's needed. This, researchers say, means the cell has a mechanism to stabilize some synapses but not others—potentially explaining why some of our memories fade, whereas others last a lifetime.

 

Although work so far on these proteins has been in yeast, sea slugs, flies and mice, the human CPEB may operate in the same way to preserve memories. The next steps, both researchers agree, are to develop better techniques to see where in the brain prions are activated, and to dig into more questions about how the prion process is regulated. One burning question: When we forget, does that mean that the prion's chain reaction has been halted?


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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M. Philip Oliver's curator insight, February 20, 2:05 PM

Brain Talk by Dr. Stefan

Eli Levine's curator insight, February 20, 3:35 PM

They may try to make us forget, and, indeed, they may actually succeed.

 

However, science works both ways, for positive uses and for negative as well.

 

Memory loss may be helpful to some, while memory retention is good for all.

Way cool science.

 

Hope it doesn't effect us negatively in some way.

 

Think about it. 

Nacho Vega's curator insight, February 21, 3:20 PM

"For a #brain cell, keeping a #memory around is a lot of work"

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Glow-in-the-dark roads make debut in Netherlands (Wired UK)

Glow-in-the-dark roads make debut in Netherlands (Wired UK) | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Light-absorbing glow-in-the-dark road markings have replaced streetlights on a 500m stretch of highway in the Netherlands
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Blood Moon Will Be A Sight To Behold During Total Lunar Eclipse - 14 April 2014 - YouTube

Blood Moon Will Be A Sight To Behold During Total Lunar Eclipse - 14 April 2014 Turn your gaze to the stars tonight for an eerie and spectacular view of the ...

Via Gust MEES
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6 Ways to Deal With Frustrating People

6 Ways to Deal With Frustrating People | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Are some people driving you crazy and blocking your path to success? Try these six tips to remove them as obstacles.
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7 Habits of Highly Emotionally Intelligent People

7 Habits of Highly Emotionally Intelligent People | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
People with high emotional intelligence tend to do better at work. So what habits do they have that set them apart?
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520 million is a big number | Teague's Tech Tricks

520 million is a big number | Teague's Tech Tricks | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Helen Teague's insight:

We are writing:

154.6 billion emails
400 million tweets
16 billion words on Facebook
52 TRILLION words on email and social media*
(*equivalent to 520 million books) --from Tom Peters' blog

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The Science of Happiness - An Experiment in Gratitude - YouTube

What makes you happy? Have you ever wondered why? Join us as we take an experimental approach on what makes people happier. Behind the Scenes of the episode!...
Helen Teague's insight:

originally seen on @Barb Jemmott's Life @ Work

You’ll never know how significant the effect of expressing gratitude is until you really do so.

“Gratitude is a kind of meta-strategy for achieving happiness. It is wonder; it is appreciation; it is looking on the bright side of a setback; it is fathoming abundance; it is thanking someone in your life; it is thanking God; it is ‘counting blessings.’ It is savoring; it is not taking things for granted; it is coping; it is present-oriented.”  - Sonja Lyubomirsky, author of The How of Happiness

 

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A Message From Your Brain: I'm Not Good At Remembering What I Hear

A Message From Your Brain: I'm Not Good At Remembering What I Hear | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

"A new study shows that we are far better at remembering what we see and touch than what we hear."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 12, 9:16 PM

How do we learn best? This is a critical question for educators to understand and to keep up-to-date with research, and this post from the National Geographic looks at new research that shows that our auditory memory is not as robust as our visual and tactile memory.

Much more information is available in the post but the shorthand is that having students engage as many senses as possible is the best way for us to reach our learners!

David Baker's curator insight, March 13, 4:33 PM

Important to remember that we structure classrooms to support learning.

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Extended Sleeplessness Leads to Irreversible Brain Damage - US News

Extended Sleeplessness Leads to Irreversible Brain Damage - US News | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
While
pulling a late night once in a while isn’t great for your health, repeated
all-nighters could lead to permanent brain damage.
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Can you learn to be creative?

Can you learn to be creative? | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
Is creativity magical? Not according to those now teaching it as a skill, discovers Colin Barras. Are there really secrets to unlocking your imagination?
Helen Teague's insight:

It might be time to revisit the box which contains the toys again.  Can you learn to be creative? Can we "grow" a creative kid?

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8 productivity proverbs backed up with interesting stats

Some productivity lessons have endured through the ages for a reason. They work. We have put together a collection of productivity proverbs and backed them u...

Via Barb Jemmott
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Patrick Killian's curator insight, February 28, 12:40 AM

start working out your goal little by little, at the end you will succeed.

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Think Empathy's Just a Nice Idea? Think Again...

Think Empathy's Just a Nice Idea? Think Again... | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Empathy In Action: How a Concept is Making Real Change In the World

 

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What this story teaches us is this:

Empathy can change the world.

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Doug Dietz decided that just doing his job wasn't enough, so he made some huge waves affecting the lives of many families. Seeing one child's pain and feeling that it was unacceptable, he committed his own time, energy, money and resources to finding a solution that would make the stress and fear go away for countless sick children.

 

Having spent years of his life devoted to streamlining and perfecting the MRI machine, it wasn't until he took a human-centered approach to design and innovation, letting compassion and empathy for others be his guide, that he began to truly push the limits of his work and find avenues of progress he couldn't have imagined before.

by Lysa Heslov


Via Edwin Rutsch, Lynnette Van Dyke
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How do you listen?

How do you listen? | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

When you are willing to listen there's an untold amount of knowledge, experience and perspective just waiting to be shared. From the person who serves you coffee in the morning to the colleague at work for whom we have neither patience nor time, to the three-year old just starting to figure out how to express their thoughts. 


Via Barb Jemmott
Helen Teague's insight:

Listening is an often overlooked skill in group dynamics and PBL that would benefit from mini-lessons or mini-reminders.

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Carolyn Williams's curator insight, February 20, 6:42 AM

This week has been a huge learning curve for me. Those you are closest to ...your family, friends and work colleagues can have the least patience. Sad

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Stretch Without Leaving Your Desk

Chances are, you’re slumped over in your chair right now, or craning your head down to read your phone. Besides the obvious neck and shoulder pain, the second most common complaint from desk jobs are that of lower back/butt pain.

Via Barb Jemmott
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Angie Mc's curator insight, February 10, 11:35 PM

Video included.