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50 things you don’t need to do anymore — Thanks to Technology!

50 things you don’t need to do anymore — Thanks to Technology! | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Via Barb Jemmott
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Taking 'the fear out of technology'

Taking 'the fear out of technology' | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
York, PA -
With the touch of a button, Michael Potteigers 83-year-old grandmother spoke face-to-face with a classroom of 25 senior citizens, many learning to use the iPad for the first time.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Yasemin Allsop's curator insight, August 17, 2013 5:30 PM

Oh what a brilliant story!

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We need to take bigger mental leaps as educators and policymakers | Education Recoded | Big Think

We need to take bigger mental leaps as educators and policymakers | Education Recoded | Big Think | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Marc Tucker's five ways that technology could be used to improve student achievement. Story reported by Scott McLeod who offers a slight shift in Tucker's thinking.

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Rescooped by Helen Teague from Learning Technology News
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Teaching Innovation Is About More Than iPads in the Classroom

Teaching Innovation Is About More Than iPads in the Classroom | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Technology, by itself, isn't curative. Human agency shapes the path.In light of this dynamic, two critical questions need to be asked and provisionally answered when integrating technology into education. The first question, while obvious at first glance, isn't always fully articulated: "What are the educational goals of technology integration?"

The second question is equally important and often more elusive: "Do the current systems and processes support the integrative and innovative goals?"


Via Nik Peachey
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Rescooped by Helen Teague from Amazing Science
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Harvard scientists invent the synaptic transistor that learns while it computes

Harvard scientists invent the synaptic transistor that learns while it computes | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

It doesn't take a Watson to realize that even the world's best supercomputers are staggeringly inefficient and energy-intensive machines.

 

Our brains have upwards of 86 billion neurons, connected by synapses that not only complete myriad logic circuits; they continuously adapt to stimuli, strengthening some connections while weakening others. We call that process learning, and it enables the kind of rapid, highly efficient computational processes that put Siri and Blue Gene to shame.

 

Materials scientists at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have now created a new type of transistor that mimics the behavior of a synapse. The novel device simultaneously modulates the flow of information in a circuit and physically adapts to changing signals.

 

Exploiting unusual properties in modern materials, the synaptic transistor could mark the beginning of a new kind of artificial intelligence: one embedded not in smart algorithms but in the very architecture of a computer.

 

“There’s extraordinary interest in building energy-efficient electronics these days,” says principal investigator Shriram Ramanathan, associate professor of materials science at Harvard SEAS.

 

“Historically, people have been focused on speed, but with speed comes the penalty of power dissipation. With electronics becoming more and more powerful and ubiquitous, you could have a huge impact by cutting down the amount of energy they consume.”

 

The human mind, for all its phenomenal computing power, runs on roughly 20 Watts of energy (less than a household light bulb), so it offers a natural model for engineers.

 

“The transistor we’ve demonstrated is really an analog to the synapse in our brains,” says co-lead author Jian Shi, a postdoctoral fellow at SEAS. “Each time a neuron initiates an action and another neuron reacts, the synapse between them increases the strength of its connection. And the faster the neurons spike each time, the stronger the synaptic connection. Essentially, it memorizes the action between the neurons.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Moore's Law: The rule that really matters in tech

Moore's Law: The rule that really matters in tech | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Year in, year out, Intel executive Mike Mayberry hears the same doomsday prediction: Moore's Law is going to run out of steam. Sometimes he even hears it from his own co-workers.

But Moore's Law, named after Intel co-founder Gordon Moore, who 47 years ago predicted a steady, two-year cadence of chip improvements, keeps defying the pessimists because a brigade of materials scientists like Mayberry continue to find ways of stretching today's silicon transistor technology even as they dig into alternatives.


Via Szabolcs Kósa, olsen jay nelson, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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