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Scientists May Have Found A Way To Bring Back Memories Of Dementia Patients

Scientists May Have Found A Way To Bring Back Memories Of Dementia Patients | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
"Since our work shows we can reverse the processes that weaken synapses, we could potentially counteract some of the beta amyloid's effects of Alzheimer's."

 



The scientists found they could then re-activate the lost memory by re-stimulating the same nerves with a memory-forming, high-frequency train of optical pulses.


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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 1, 2014 5:24 PM

The scientists found they could then re-activate the lost memory by re-stimulating the same nerves with a memory-forming, high-frequency train of optical pulses.


Rescooped by Helen Teague from 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)...
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Teenager Builds Cancer-Detecting Artificial Brain

Teenager Builds Cancer-Detecting Artificial Brain | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

The second annual Google Science Fair, a science talent competition for kids ages 13 to 18, was held this month in Palo Alto, California. This year’s winner, 17-year-old Brittany Wenger, wrote a cloud-based computer program that makes breast cancer detection less invasive. She called it the “Global Neural Network Cloud Service for Breast Cancer.” Wenger created computer programs coded to think like the human brain and then used them to locate mass malignancy in breast tissue samples.

 

BLOG: Engineered Viruses Could Kill Cancer

 

Traditional methods of finding mass malignancy use a minimally invasive, but painful, biopsy called a fine needle aspirate (FNA). Analyzing tissues collected with this method isn’t always effective and sometimes results in further invasive procedures. Wegner tested her method with 7.6 million trials to see how accurately it would detect cancerous tumors. It succeeded with a 97.4 percent success rate in prediction and 99.1 percent sensitivity to malignancy when analyzing samples collected from FNA. Employing this data to a cloud service could make it possible for doctors to assess tumors without employing more invasive testing.

 

Read more:

http://news.discovery.com/tech/teenager-builds-cancer-detecting-artificial-brain-120725.html#mkcpgn=rssnws1

 


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A Message From Your Brain: I'm Not Good At Remembering What I Hear

A Message From Your Brain: I'm Not Good At Remembering What I Hear | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

"A new study shows that we are far better at remembering what we see and touch than what we hear."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 12, 2014 9:16 PM

How do we learn best? This is a critical question for educators to understand and to keep up-to-date with research, and this post from the National Geographic looks at new research that shows that our auditory memory is not as robust as our visual and tactile memory.

Much more information is available in the post but the shorthand is that having students engage as many senses as possible is the best way for us to reach our learners!

David Baker's curator insight, March 13, 2014 4:33 PM

Important to remember that we structure classrooms to support learning.