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All things related to Polarity Thinking, Thinking Collaborative, Cognitive Coaching, Neuroleadership, Adaptive Schools, and Collaboration in education
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5 Steps For Leading Through Adaptive Change

5 Steps For Leading Through Adaptive Change | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it

Leadership and management are two distinctly different but complimentary skill sets that all companies need. Leaders make sure the organization is doing the right things, while managers make sure they do those things right. Leadership is about coping with change while management is about coping with complex issues. Both are qualities that can be learned and both require constant focus on improvement. Especially when the organization is facing potential adaptive challenges.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Jay Roth's insight:

Perfect article to suggest (in schools) WHY the trainings of Cognitive Coaching, Adaptive Schools, and Polarity Thinking is necessary!

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God Is.'s curator insight, August 12, 12:00 PM

Seems like we are all experiencing changes in the world we are living in. We have to go thru the changes necessary to succeed. This article explains some of what needs to happen in order to survive and thrive...

Josie Gibson's curator insight, August 12, 6:20 PM

Thanks to @LeadershipABC for highlighting this article.

Eric Chan Wei Chiang's curator insight, August 12, 11:25 PM

These five steps may seem very simple but they are often taken for granted. To give direction a leader must take ownership and have a vision. Managing conflict and providing protection are often not pleasant and require great maturity from leaders. Shaping the norms and clarifying roles is often not given a very high priority as it involves intangible people skills.

 

Read more scoops on change and leadership here: http://www.scoop.it/t/on-leaders-and-managers/?tag=Change

http://www.scoop.it/t/on-leaders-and-managers/?tag=Leadership

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Managing intractable problems: the neuroscience of polarity thinking

Managing intractable problems: the neuroscience of polarity thinking | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it
Linda Ray looks at how some problems just can't be solved, only managed.  What we know about the brain sheds light on the importance of polarity management at a time when we need more and more crea...
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Conversational Neurochemistry - Why negative comments stick with us so much

Conversational Neurochemistry - Why negative comments stick with us so much | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it
Practice "mind opening" psychology in your teams and organizations.

Via Anne Leong
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Superintendent: The greatest ‘crime’ committed against the teaching profession

Superintendent: The greatest ‘crime’ committed against the teaching profession | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it
A lesson from the Enron scandal.
Jay Roth's insight:

This highlights several polarities in education, particularly "accountability AND local control" (which is a version of "Centralization AND Decentralization")

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Left Brain vs. Right: It's a Myth, Research Finds

Left Brain vs. Right: It's a Myth, Research Finds | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it
The idea that some people are "left-brained," meaning they are highly analytical, while others are "right-brained," or more creative, is not true, according to a new study that looked at brain scans of more than 1,000 people.

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The Neuroscience of Leadership and Fairness


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Linking Emotional Intelligence to Neuroscience

Linking Emotional Intelligence to Neuroscience | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it
Nick Mills, a current Neuroscience of Leadership student and the Principal Consultant at Eureka Training, shares his thoughts on emotional intelligence and what learning about the brain can do to h...

Via Romi Royé, Lisa McCarthy
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Leadership isn't an individual act; it's an ensemble performance

Leadership isn't an individual act; it's an ensemble performance | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it
Leaders can only lead in participation with others being led, so why do most business schools cling to notions of individualism?

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Neuroscience and leadership development - what can we learn? | HRZone

Neuroscience and leadership development - what can we learn? | HRZone | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it
A new study measured the stress response in managers to unexpected situations and crises. (The neurobiological implications of #stress in the #workplace .

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Presenting the Polarity Thinking Trio @ STIA+2014: Seattle

Presenting the Polarity Thinking Trio @ STIA+2014: Seattle | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it
Jay Roth's insight:

3 videos: one of Barry Johnson, Cliff Kayser, and Jake Jacobs at the Systems Thinking In Action conference

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Our Dire EQ Gap

Our Dire EQ Gap | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it

The news media regularly reports on yet another famous individual caught out in inappropriate, injudicious behavior. This includes leaders in industry and government as well as ‘stars’ in entertainment and sports. These individuals, despite their brilliance, talent, wealth and power, are shown to have feet of clay. This metaphor is from the Book of Daniel, written over 2000 years ago. Clearly we’ve known about our self-destructive capacity for a very long time. These dramatic instances of poor behaviour are both fodder for tabloids and for great enduring literature. Today we ascribe this self-defeating behaviour as a lack of social and emotional intelligence.

 

EQ, also known as Emotional Intelligence, has four broad dimensions – self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management. It’s a natural complement to Cognitive Intelligence, or IQ (Intellectual Quotient). Like IQ, EQ is also needed at all life stages. EQ has four broad dimensions – self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management.

 

Our collective “EQ Gap” plays out in our own lives at school, work, and the community. While it usually doesn’t become a news story, the consequences are just as dramatic and destructive….


Via HBEsbin, Sushma Sharma
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Are You a Holistic or a Specific Thinker?

Are You a Holistic or a Specific Thinker? | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it
It might depend on where you're from.
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Autonomy or Compliance? Navigating the Balance

Autonomy or Compliance? Navigating the Balance | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it
How do you enable people to take the initiative to make needed creative decisions in their work with the equally important discipline needed to follow standard procedures? The answer isn't obvious....
Jay Roth's insight:

Mapping this polarity helps clarify how to do both

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Human Capital | Brainwaves For Leaders

Human Capital | Brainwaves For Leaders | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it
Posts about Human Capital written by NeuroCapability
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This is your brain on long meetings...

This is your brain on long meetings... | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it
Linda Ray, the co-founder and co-director of neuresource group, coined the term “attentional intelligence” in 2012. In this post, she looks at the reasons long meetings get in the way of productivi...
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What neuroscience explains and challenges about leadership

What neuroscience explains and challenges about leadership | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it
Dr Jacqui Grey from the NeuroLeadership Institute introduced this session by asking the following sets of questions: How many of you wake up with your brain racing? How many have trouble generally ...

Via Anne Leong
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A teacher’s plea to bosses: Give us ‘time and autonomy to create solutions’

A teacher’s plea to bosses: Give us ‘time and autonomy to create solutions’ | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it
Ask a teacher about his/her job, and you will hear about the lack of planning and collaboration time. Here's why it is so important.
Jay Roth's insight:

Autonomy: a neuroleadership element (David Rock's SCARF model) and a characteristic of motivation without incentives (Daniel Pink's DRIVE)

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5 Important Things To Teach Students About The Brain - Edudemic

5 Important Things To Teach Students About The Brain - Edudemic | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it

"One excellent notion that has come from 21st century thinking/teaching is a desire to understand how our brains work, and to figure out what processes are driving our actions and emotions. It is now common practice for educators to graduate from their teaching programs having learned about how the development and function of the brain can affect their students’ experiences in school. While this knowledge was once directed more toward the psychological fields of study, it is now considered as vital knowledge in education as well."


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The SCARF Model | Barbara Frodsham

The SCARF Model | Barbara Frodsham | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it
The SCARF Model: David Rock works with  Neuroscience and leadership – he calls it Neuroleadership. His researc... http://t.co/Upe1RH8uth

Via bill woodruff, Lisa McCarthy
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Neuroscience and Leadership

Neuroscience and Leadership | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it

Regardless of disadvantageous experiences, especially in early life, individuals who truly want to develop their leadership capacity can do so through personal discipline and focused attention.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Lisa McCarthy
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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, December 12, 2012 3:06 PM

Interesting article... I have some smaller reserve though... the most importatnt is that as far as I know the left and right hemisphere is toda rather a metaphora than a physical reality (when one of them is hurt, the other more or less takes over without problem its functionality) but if we take it as it is - a strong metaphorb - the sens of the argunment is as good as it would be a physical reality...

Kasia Hein-Peters's curator insight, April 21, 2013 1:56 PM

Leaders are not born, they are coached.

Sue Rizzello's curator insight, December 19, 2013 2:01 AM

Learning, discipline and focus are part of earning a leadership position. Self perception as a leader is a fundamental part of building that perception in others. You communicate how you think in everything you say and do in interacting with the world.

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Neuroscience and Leadership: How to be the Boss of Your Brain by Amanda Gore

http://www.amandagore.com Amanda Gore looks at Neuroscience and how the brain works. Your brain loves change and you can train it to learn anything! Beware o...

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Neuroscience of Leadership - Part 1

Dr. David Rock starts off with describing how understanding individual change helps to understand organizational change. Neuroscience research on the human b...

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Thinkers v. producers - Dangerously Irrelevant

Thinkers v. producers - Dangerously Irrelevant | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it

"In How Children Fail, John Holt makes the following distinction:

 

producers - students who are only interested in getting right answers, and who make more or less uncritical use of rules and formulae to get them

 

thinkers – students who try to think about the meaning, the reality, of whatever it is they are working on"


Via John Evans
Jay Roth's insight:

An educational polarity: how do we educate so students are BOTH "producers" AND "thinkers"

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Change Leader, Change Thyself

Change Leader, Change Thyself | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it

"Leo Tolstoy, the Russian novelist, famously wrote, “Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.”

Tolstoy’s dictum is a useful starting point for any executive engaged in organizational change. After years of collaborating in efforts to advance the practice of leadership and cultural transformation, we’ve become convinced that organizational change is inseparable from individual change. Simply put, change efforts often falter because individuals overlook the need to make fundamental changes in themselves.1

Building self-understanding and then translating it into an organizational context is easier said than done, and getting started is often the hardest part. We hope this article helps leaders who are ready to try and will intrigue those curious to learn more.

Organizations don’t change—people do

Many companies move quickly from setting their performance objectives to implementing a suite of change initiatives. Be it a new growth strategy or business-unit structure, the integration of a recent acquisition or the rollout of a new operational-improvement effort, such organizations focus on altering systems and structures and on creating new policies and processes.

To achieve collective change over time, actions like these are necessary but seldom sufficient. A new strategy will fall short of its potential if it fails to address the underlying mind-sets and capabilities of the people who will execute it.

McKinsey research and client experience suggest that half of all efforts to transform organizational performance fail either because senior managers don’t act as role models for change or because people in the organization defend the status quo.2 In other words, despite the stated change goals, people on the ground tend to behave as they did before. Equally, the same McKinsey research indicates that if companies can identify and address pervasive mind-sets at the outset, they are four times more likely to succeed in organizational-change efforts than are companies that overlook this stage.

Look both inward and outward

Companies that only look outward in the process of organizational change—marginalizing individual learning and adaptation—tend to make two common mistakes.

The first is to focus solely on business outcomes. That means these companies direct their attention to what Alexander Grashow, Ronald Heifetz, and Marty Linsky call the “technical” aspects of a new solution, while failing to appreciate what they call “the adaptive work” people must do to implement it.3

The second common mistake, made even by companies that recognize the need for new learning, is to focus too much on developing skills. Training that only emphasizes new behavior rarely translates into profoundly different performance outside the classroom.

In our work together with organizations undertaking leadership and cultural transformations, we’ve found that the best way to achieve an organization’s aspirations is to combine efforts that look outward with those that look inward. Linking strategic and systemic intervention to genuine self-discovery and self-development by leaders is a far better path to embracing the vision of the organization and to realizing its business goals.

What is looking inward?

Looking inward is a way to examine your own modes of operating to learn what makes you tick. Individuals have their own inner lives, populated by their beliefs, priorities, aspirations, values, and fears. These interior elements vary from one person to the next, directing people to take different actions.

Interestingly, many people aren’t aware that the choices they make are extensions of the reality that operates in their hearts and minds. Indeed, you can live your whole life without understanding the inner dynamics that drive what you do and say. Yet it’s crucial that those who seek to lead powerfully and effectively look at their internal experiences, precisely because they direct how you take action, whether you know it or not. Taking accountability as a leader today includes understanding your motivations and other inner drives.

For the purposes of this article, we focus on two dimensions of looking inward that lead to self-understanding: developing profile awareness and developing state awareness.

Profile awareness

An individual’s profile is a combination of his or her habits of thought, emotions, hopes, and behavior in various circumstances. Profile awareness is therefore a recognition of these common tendencies and the impact they have on others.

We often observe a rudimentary level of profile awareness with the executives we advise. They use labels as a shorthand to describe their profile, telling us, “I’m an overachiever” or “I’m a control freak.” Others recognize emotional patterns, like “I always fear the worst,” or limiting beliefs, such as “you can’t trust anyone.” Other executives we’ve counseled divide their identity in half. They end up with a simple liking for their “good” Dr. Jekyll side and a dislike of their “bad” Mr. Hyde.

Finding ways to describe the common internal tendencies that drive behavior is a good start. We now know, however, that successful leaders develop profile awareness at a broader and deeper level.

State awareness

State awareness, meanwhile, is the recognition of what’s driving you at the moment you take action. In common parlance, people use the phrase “state of mind” to describe this, but we’re using “state” to refer to more than the thoughts in your mind. State awareness involves the real-time perception of a wide range of inner experiences and their impact on your behavior. These include your current mind-set and beliefs, fears and hopes, desires and defenses, and impulses to take action.

State awareness is harder to master than profile awareness. While many senior executives recognize their tendency to exhibit negative behavior under pressure, they often don’t realize they’re exhibiting that behavior until well after they’ve started to do so. At that point, the damage is already done.

We believe that in the future, the best leaders will demonstrate both profile awareness and state awareness. These capacities can develop into the ability to shift one’s inner state in real time. That leads to changing behavior when you can still affect the outcome, instead of looking back later with regret. It also means not overreacting to events because they are reminiscent of something in the past or evocative of something that might occur in the future.4

Close the performance gap

When learning to look inward in the process of organizational transformation, individuals accelerate the pace and depth of change dramatically. In the words of one executive we know, who has invested heavily in developing these skills, this kind of learning “expands your capacity to lead human change and deliver true impact by awakening the full leader within you.” In practical terms, individuals learn to align what they intend with what they actually say and do to influence others.

Erica Ariel Fox’s recent book, Winning from Within,5 calls this phenomenon closing your performance gap. That gap is the disparity between what people know they should say and do to behave successfully and what they actually do in the moment. The performance gap can affect anyone at any time, from the CEO to a summer intern.

This performance gap arises in individuals partly because of the profile that defines them and that they use to define themselves. In the West in particular, various assessments tell you your “type,” essentially the psychological clothing you wear to present yourself to the world.

To help managers and employees understand each other, many corporate-education tools use simplified typing systems to describe each party’s makeup. These tests often classify people relatively quickly, and in easily remembered ways: team members might be red or blue, green or yellow, for example.

There are benefits in this approach, but in our experience it does not go far enough and those using it should understand its limitations. We all possess the full range of qualities these assessments identify. We are not one thing or the other: we are all at once, to varying degrees. As renowned brain researcher Dr. Daniel Siegel explains, “we must accept our multiplicity, the fact that we can show up quite differently in our athletic, intellectual, sexual, spiritual—or many other—states. A heterogeneous collection of states is completely normal in us humans.”6 Putting the same point more poetically, Walt Whitman famously wrote, “I am large, I contain multitudes.”"


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How to Connect Forgiveness and Accountability

How to Connect Forgiveness and Accountability | Polarity, Coaching, Thinking, Leading, Collaborating | Scoop.it
Forgiveness determines the breadth, depth, and duration of all relationships. People disappoint. The more you expect from others the more likely you’ll feel disappointed. Don’t lower expectations. ...
Jay Roth's insight:

Learn to do BOTH forgiveness AND accountability

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