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How To Take Interesting iPhone Photos In Your Home

How To Take Interesting iPhone Photos In Your Home | ARTicles | Scoop.it
How often do you take iPhone photos around your home? Sometimes we’re so preoccupied with seeking out new photography locations and subjects that we miss what’s right in front of us.

Via jack hollingsworth
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Inspire Thoughtful Creative Writing Through Art | Denise Cassano Blog | Edutopia.org

Inspire Thoughtful Creative Writing Through Art | Denise Cassano Blog | Edutopia.org | ARTicles | Scoop.it

A few years ago, I showed my sixth graders The Gulf Stream by Winslow Homer. It's an epic painting of a young black sailor in a small broken boat, surrounded by flailing sharks, huge swells, and a massive storm in the distance. I asked my students the simple question, "What's happening?" The responses ranged from "He's a slave trying to escape" to "He's a fisherman lost at sea." The common theme with the responses, though, was the tone -- most students were very concerned for his welfare. "That boat looks rickety. I think he’s going to get eaten by the sharks," was a common refrain. Then a very quiet, shy girl raised her hand. "It's OK, he'll be fine," she said. "The ship will save him."

 

The room got quiet as everyone stared intently at the painting. I looked closely at it. "What ship?" I responded. The young girl walked up to the image and pointed to the top left corner. Sure enough, faded in the smoky distance was a ship.

 

This revelation changed the tone and content of the conversation that followed. Some thought it was the ship that would save him. Others thought it was the ship that cast him off to his death. Would the storm, sharks, or ship get him? The best part of this intense debate was hearing the divergent, creative responses. Some students even argued. The written story produced as a result of analyzing this image was powerful.

 

Since this experience, I have developed strategies that harness the power of observation, analysis, and writing through my art lessons.

 

Children naturally connect thoughts, words, and images long before they master the skill of writing. This act of capturing meaning in multiple symbol systems and then vacillating from one medium to another is called transmediation. While using art in the classroom, students transfer this visual content, and then add new ideas and information from their personal experiences to create newly invented narratives. Using this three-step process of observe, interpret, and create helps kids generate ideas, organize thoughts, and communicate effectively.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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The line between art and photography | Ming Thein

The line between art and photography | Ming Thein | ARTicles | Scoop.it


Here’s a provocative question: is this image art? Why? Why not? Have a think about this carefully, for a moment. Today I’m going to crack open the lid of one of the biggest cans of worms in the whole of photography, peer inside, give you my 1.53 cents* and try not to fall inside.

*Devaluated from two cents since 2009 due to underdeclared inflation, quantitative easing, foreign debt and other economic screwups

 

Perhaps the biggest struggle photography has faced historically as a medium is to be taken seriously as an art form. I’d say it’s only in the last couple of decades that the results at auction have been able to hold their own against traditional art forms; even if a good chunk of us don’t understand why – myself included. (I’m probably not the only one thinking of Andreas Gursky here.) Yet we don’t have photographs insured for hundreds of millions of dollars, or exhibited behind bulletproof glass, or even the subject of exciting art heists – let alone Hollywood movies – why is this? ....


Via Thomas Menk
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Children’s Book Illustrations Only Reveal Themselves By Flashlight [Video]

Children’s Book Illustrations Only Reveal Themselves By Flashlight [Video] | ARTicles | Scoop.it
The Hide & Eek! children's book has hidden pictures that appear when light is shone onto them.

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
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kevinye's comment, August 21, 2013 2:41 AM
Children book printing in China--CM Color printing.We provide kinds of children book printing services!