Theme 1: Managing the Natural Environment
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Theme 1: Managing the Natural Environment
Reliable links for Focus Units: managing catchments and responding to natural hazards
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Los Angeles Gets Serious About Preparing for the "Big One" - Eos

Los Angeles Gets Serious About Preparing for the "Big One" - Eos | Theme 1: Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it
A large earthquake in southern California could devastate Los Angeles. To help reduce the city's risks, one scientist spent last year working in the LA mayor's office.
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An article on being proactive rather than reactive when managing natural hazards.

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Typhoon Haiyan Before & After - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Typhoon Haiyan Before & After - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Theme 1: Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it
View interactive before and after images showing the devastation Typhoon Haiyan has caused in Tacloban City, Philippines.
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Natural Hazard Early Warning Systems Improved by GPS Tracking ...

GPS Technology now being used to detect natural disasters before they occur. Natural hazards, like tsunamis, earthquakes and tornadoes, cause disastrous.
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Erosion in Action

News 8 chief photojournalist Kevyn Fowler captured a road collapsing in Freeport, Maine during a storm.

Via Seth Dixon
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Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:53 PM

Erosion in Action | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Shelby Porter's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:23 PM

Normally we see erosion on a piece of land over a long period of time. In this short video, we see what erosion can do to in mere minutes. It is scary to think how much the roads we drive on are eroding right underneath our cars. It is amazing how much the environment around us can change due to the weather. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:30 AM
This video is crazy! It shows the erosion of a road during a storm. The water was supposed to run under the road and flow through a large pipe. As you can see after watching the video the road eventually erodes and then the pipe begins to bouy up and down. Later the road is completely deteriorated and the pipe ran down the river with the rest of the road.
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Emergency and Disaster Information Service

Emergency and Disaster Information Service | Theme 1: Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it

Map of the World, in real time with natural disaster information.

"This is a Emergency and Disasters Information and monitoring services. Hosted by National Association of Radio-distress signalling and Infocommunications.


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Tsunami in Japan 2011

"This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami in Japan."


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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:17 PM

Most people do not realize the sheer power of a tsunami. It has the force of the entire ocean depth behind each wave. It also pours onto land for hours until it stops then pours back into the ocean for another hour or so. Most people killed are killed by objects such as cars and buildings crushing them. Seeing videos such as these can help people get a better idea of the forces actually involved and maybe save lives.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:33 PM

I hope something like this never happens again. Tsunamis are unreal. They are literally horrifying and to see something like this captured on camera is actually really scary. Damn plate tectonics and people living on the water front.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 1:52 PM

So, I will never forget this morning because my brother was living in Japan at the time and I remember getting a text from him saying "we are ok."  My brother is a bit of a jokester so I figured he had something up his sleeve, however, when I woke up and heard of the destruction, I was so relieved to know he and his family were safe.  For the next month my brother flew rescue missions and brought water and food to the survivors.  He had taken hundred of pictures, and I was able to witness first hand how devastating the tsunami had been.  My heart still goes out to those people, and I am forever grateful that my brother is alive and well.

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Typhoon Haiyan slams the Philippines

Typhoon Haiyan slams the Philippines | Theme 1: Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it
Typhoon Haiyan, the strongest storm on Earth this year, approximately 600 kilometres wide, has slammed into the Philippines' central islands forcing millions of people to move to safer ground and storm shelters, cutting power and phone lines, and...
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Earth Alerts – live map of our planet's natural hazards makes for ...

Earth Alerts – live map of our planet's natural hazards makes for ... | Theme 1: Managing the Natural Environment | Scoop.it
You don't have to live in an earthquake zone to appreciate the benefits of knowing if and when things are going to get a little hot and sticky at any time. And by things, we mean natural disasters. Just ask the European ...
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What is a Hotspot?

1) What is a hotspot? A volcanic "hotspot" is an area in the upper mantle from which heat rises in a plume from deep in the Earth. High heat and lower pressure at the base of the mantle facilitates melting of the rock. This melt, called magma, rises through cracks to the surface and forms volcanoes. As the tectonic plate moves over the stationary hot spot, the volcanoes are rafted away and new ones form in their place.


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Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 22, 2015 9:46 PM

While watching this video you can learn a lot about a hotspot in just 2 minutes, understanding that a hotspot is an area in the upper mantle in which heat rises and slowly begins to expand, building up pressure. The magma, which is hot rises and the cold matter sinks. the magma rises through the cracks and the plates actually carry the volcano. How did the whole idea of a volcano occur? Who knows where these volcanos are?  The hotspot can cause volcanos to erupt or even cause the volcanos to spread out, who knew a hotspot could be such a huge influence on the world, causing massive landforms and causing much tragedy.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:33 AM

What is a hotspot? It is a source of localized energy from the seafloor that creates volcanoes. It is not just a shallow reservoir nor a pipe filled with liquid. It is a constant stream of magma that does not move. Simple the plate move over it creating a row of multiple volcanoes, such as the Hawaiian Islands. When the magma erupts thru the surface the magma then turns to lava, and dries to rock. This process repeats until the built up lava is a volcano, still with hotspot in the middle. The plate moves and the hotspot creates a new volcano.

                This is interesting because hotspots are always changing geography, and causing map makers and teachers everywhere to learn new islands. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:18 PM

this is a good way to discover how volcanoes are formed, and if you are trying to understand the Oceania region then this is information you need to know.