Their own class and family groups.
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Their own class and family groups.
These resources collected here, are Early Stage 1 appropriate, and connect to the K-6 HSIE cultures outcome CUES1.
Curated by Sarah Hickie
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Cherbourg children's picture diaries virtual book - State Library of Queensland

Sarah Hickie's insight:

This resource is a virtual picture book, which can be read and viewed online or on an interactive whiteboard in a classroom.  This resource contains Aboriginal perspectives, and is a way to incorporate Indigenous Australian perspectives into student's exploration of this cultures outcome, CUES1, including common characteristics people share, in regards to their own class and family groups.  The picture book, is a collection of picture diary entries, written and illustrated by students from Cherbourg State School, in Queensland.  The school is located in the Indigenous community of Cherbourg, and has a majority Indigenous enrolment.  Each diary entry in the book is from a student, writing about themselves, and about their life and family.  This is an authentic text to use to incorporate Aboriginal perspectives into the curriculum, as it is written by Indigenous children, explaining their own lives and experience.  There is no othering or stereotyping of Aboriginal culture, and the entries written by the students present a contemporary Aboriginal perspective.  It also presents a look at characteristics of these Aboriginal children's lives that students in any Australian primary class can relate to.   

To incorporate this resource into a teaching idea of my own, I would begin by linking to any previous experiences the class had had with Aboriginal cultural education, or even arrange prior to this lesson to have a lesson on our local indigenous communities culture, with a member from the community.  I would then explain the context of the picture book, created by primary student's like them, who are Aboriginal Australians, and attend a school which is located in an Indigenous community.  I would then read through the book and as a class we would identify and discuss parts of the children's lives, that have common characteristics to my own student's lives, and also identify any differences.  To give students a better idea about the students of Cherbourg school who wrote this book, I would also show them a YouTube video about the school (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TslMQ-wthSQ).  I would still use the virtual book as the main resource in this lesson, as it is more at the early stage 1 level the students I am focusing on here, are at.  Also the themes in the book are more relatable and understandable for the young age of the students, than some of those in the video (in fact I would only show the first 1:25 of the video, as this is the part of the video that focuses on  the theme of the school as a community).  I would write on the board some of the key words used in this video, including, our community, history, belonging, etc., and  would continue to focus on this idea of our school, and our class, as a group student's belong to.  I would then use an interactive mind mapping strategy, and get student's to identify what makes our own class a group, including how are we all members, and what ties us together (eg, local community, local history, etc.).  There is also a strong link to literacy strategies in these activities, as students will be encouraged to talk about multimedia texts and decode texts, including video and virtual book.   It is important to note also, that such digital technology and virtual books are an emerging and evolving part of technological pedagogy.  Such resources can be intimidating to use in the classroom, but also offer a new and creative experience beyond the traditional text.  Teacher's tough, do need to have this technological knowledge, Mishra and Koehler (2006), argue that the best way to develop this knowledge and keep up with evolving and new technologies, is through a learning technology by design model, which means just using these technologies as regularly and authentically as possible in the classroom. 

For an assessment task to connect to this resource, I would move into a creative arts centred task.  The virtual picture book, is filled with student created illustrations, that I would draw student's attention too.  I would get my own students to create their own illustrations of themselves, or of their day at school, or our class, or from their lives.  I would also work with them to create a diary entry page similar to the ones in the Cherbourg picture diary, about themselves and as members of our class (connecting to the themes we looked at earlier).  I would then put these entries together into our own class picture book to go in our classroom library.    

References:

Mishra, P. & Koehler, M.J. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College Record. Volume 108, Number 6, pp. 1017-1054.

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Books About All Kinds Of Families

Books About All Kinds Of Families | Their own class and family groups. | Scoop.it
Families don't fit a mold. Children deserve to see their family in books and these books showcase families of all sorts.
Sarah Hickie's insight:

This resources is an online article, that is listing and reviewing picture books about different types of families.  This article would be helpful for a teacher who was interested in using a picture book for a lesson around the subject matter, their own class and family groups, but didn't know where to start.  The books listed, cover a variety of stories and different types of family groups, so there are a lot of options available to explore.  One teaching idea I had from this online resource, was to get a couple of these picture books, that explore different family types, to read with an early stage 1 class.  I would begin by exploring some of the different family groups found in the books, (for example grandparents as main careers, or single parent family, etc.).  I would then move the discussion onto some of the personal family groups found among our own class.  This first learning task involves shared reading, which a key part of early stage 1 literacy, including text decoding and reading strategies.  If students felt comfortable, I would also get a few students to volunteer to share about their own family, for example the members who live in their house, and even bring in some family artefacts, such as photos as a sort of show and tell.  I would also like to do a more interactive, student cantered, activity following this discussion, so I would introduce a small group based game to the class, (based around characters from the books we read earlier) where students have to arrange different family groups and label them.  The idea behind these activities is to have students talking about how their family groups can come in all shapes and sizes, and communicating what characteristics of family they share with their classmates, and some differences.  To finish up this lesson idea, I would construct a large tree wall stencil/motif that students would decorate with pictures of their own families, drawings, and vocabulary words from this lesson to make as adisplay for our classroom wall, under theheading: 'Our Families', as a way to share our class's exploration with the CUES1 outcome. 

The sharing aspect of this resource is also interesting.  Social networking through the internet and web based resources, has become a growing area for professional learning opportunities for many educators (Morris & Hay, 2012).  As a 21st century teacher, planning for teaching and learning has certainly changed, online resources such as this article, are a way of sharing knowledge and having conversations with other educators through a new type of professional platform.  Sort of like a global educational community for developing quality teaching.

References:

Morris, B. & Hay, L. (2012). Building A School Based Professional Learning Network.  Scan. Volume 31, Issue 2, pp. 24-34.

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Families of the World

Families of the World | Their own class and family groups. | Scoop.it
Award winning and highly acclaimed Families of the World Series documents how children and their families live in each country.
Sarah Hickie's insight:

This resource is a YouTube playlist of 'Families of the World' video trailers.  On this playlist there are various clips of children from around the world, explaining where they live, and snippets from their day at school and with their families.  This online resource looks at both the school groups and family groups the children are a part of, so fits well with the cultures subject matter, their class and family groups.  This resource also opens up for an exploration of the similarities and differences of class groups and family group in different cultures from my own student's.  The video medium is also a great way for students to experience global cultures within the classroom.  This 'Families of the World' series, also has many options of cultures to explore, including both urban and rural for each country.  In the classroom we could look specifically at some of Australia's pacific neighbours, or if there was one country relevant to other work students were doing in class, we could look at the clips available from that country.  For a learning task to use with this resource, I would watch through the clip once with students, for example the Families for Philippians urban trailer.  Then I would replay the video at a slower pace, stopping at relevant sections, and getting students to share about their own lives in comparison (for example their own family members, school customs, eating customs, house their family lives in, transport to school, etc.). 

For an assessment task to go with this resource, I would assign students, in pairs, a video from this series to watch (in a computer lab setting).  I would get each pair to select a specific part of the video they found interesting or different to their own family lives, and construct a sentence together explaining this comparison, then they could draw a picture to go with this sentence.  The focus of this assessment task would be to get students beginning to expand their perspectives of their lives and own cultures to a more global level.  This task is also a good way to incorporate more student centred learning into the curriculum program.  Engaging with technology in the classroom, such as on a computer watching and then evaluating a video, takes learners from a passive learner role, into a position where they are in control in their own learning (Mishra & Koehler, 2006).  Similarly this also has the benefit of being an authentic way for young learners to begin learning how to use technologies, something that is very relevant in our lifetime, in a way that is still connected to subject matter and pedagogy, or as Mishra and Koehler (2006) describe it, learning technology by design. 

Such an assessment task would also require a literacy strategy to support students with writing.  Before getting them to write the sentence I would scaffold this learning activity by going through some examples, by writing some of my own first, I would also provide students with any vocabulary they would need for the task.  If any of the students were still finding the task difficult, I would then provide them with a sentence starter.

References:

Mishra, P. & Koehler, M.J. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College Record Volume 108, Number 6, pp. 1017-1054.

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7 photos that reveal what families eat in one week | Oxfam America First Person Blog

7 photos that reveal what families eat in one week | Oxfam America First Person Blog | Their own class and family groups. | Scoop.it
In a new series of photos, families worldwide pose with one week's food supply.
Sarah Hickie's insight:

This resource is an article from Oxfam America, presenting photos of what families worldwide eat in one week.  The photos depict a variety of family groups, from around the world,  posing with one week's food supply.  As this resource is very visual it would work well as a way to introduce more complex ideas about culture, with integrity into an Early Stage 1 classroom.  The deeper focus of the article is world hunger, and food, distribution and availability as a resource around the world.  This is a global issue that can also be connected to this specific culture outcome and subject matter.  For example, I could use an activity where, as a class, we look at food consumption in the countries depicted in the photos and compare this to our local area in Australia, and is it very different.  We could make a chart or graph together on the interactive whiteboard to make this information more visual and readable for ES1 students.  I would also ask students to consider this differences between the food the families have in these pictures, compared to their own families.  If the food is similar or different to what their own families eat? Which countries are different? Is the food more fresh, or homemade, or from a grocery store? Is there enough food, do some of these families have a lot or little to eat? And do students want to suggest why, some countries food consumption might be different from our own? If I were to introduce a chart or graph into this lesson activity, I would have to introduce the concept of graphs to students before hand in a separate mathematics lesson, particularly regarding, how to read a chart, and even then, this part of the lesson will mostly be teacher lead. 

As well as connecting student's own lives to global cultures, this resource would also be an excellent way to start to explore the variety of families and cultures in our own classroom.  One teaching idea I had, would be to get students to bring in pictures of their own families enjoying a meal or at dinner time, and have students explain in small groups, their own family group, and some examples of their own culture depicted in their photographs (such as the food they are eating, or the specific meal they are sharing).  I would want this activity to be part of a larger unit of work around the CUES1 outcome about the students individual lives and cultures, and a part of this would be a wall display showing the variety of cultures of students in our classroom.  So an assessment task idea I had would be to divide the students into small groups and get them to create group posters where they add their family photo they brought in, and decorate the poster with images, drawings, and words that relate to the different families in our class.  Then students would present their group's poster to the class, explaining something they learnt about another students family or cultural background.

I think what is most interesting about this resource is that it has a global perspective in its approach.  It encourages a deeper understanding of a serious global issue.  Gilbert and Hoepper (2011) argue that a key role of the HSIE KLA is this focus on the development of students as global citizens.  Schools and educators have a responsibility in this development, to build up active and informed citizens of our world community, and this includes teaching about serious humanitarian issues, sustainability, etc. (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011). 

References:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE ® Institute - Lesson: I Belong to Many Groups

The goal of the Anti-Defamation League's A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE Institute is to recognize bias and the harm it inflicts on individuals and society, to explore the value of diversity and improve intergroup relations and to combat racism,...
Sarah Hickie's insight:

This resource is an online lesson plan, focused on student's identities, and the groups they belong too.  This resource would be useful for a teacher to use when planning, or looking for ideas for a lesson, for the subject matter of 'their own class and family groups', as the lesson plan, is focused on getting students to recognise the different groups they belong to in their lives, and how this is a part of their identities.  The specific lesson at the source is more advanced than would be appropriate for the Early Stage 1 area I am looking at, but I do think the first activity from this lesson plan, could work well if adapted.  So from this resource I have a few teaching ideas.  I would begin with a brainstorm of the different groups students in the class belong to, for example, family, school groups, local community groups, or personal identity groups.  I would facilitate and encourage this discussion by having images of different groupings (appropriate to the lives of the students I was teaching) up on the interactive whiteboard, and if students identified with any of the examples, they could say.  I would also write up on the board the different group examples students gave during this brainstorm, so they will have a vocab bank to refer to in any further activities or lessons. Next I would move onto the game from this lesson resource.  I would have students line up along one wall of the classroom, and call out some of the groups students might belong to.  When students hear a group, they believe they are a part of they should step forward out of the line.  With each turn I would encourage students to observe how many of their classmates also step forward, whether the whole class (eg, for a family, or school group) or just a few students (eg, such as, local sport group, or cultural groups).   

One assessment task I could do after this activity, would be to have a discussion with students.  This discussion would begin with having students talk about what they noticed about their class's membership to different groups.  Did they notice similar groups they belonged to, to their classmates?  And did they notice some different groups they all belonged to?  This would be a chance to hear my students talking about what they have actually learnt during this lesson, and also see if they are communicating some of the characteristics they may share with their classmates as well as differences.  I would then have students create drawings of themselves in the groups they belong to, and underneath write a sentence about the groups they belong to.  This assessment task would allow me to have a work sample to collect from all students, and also to see if my students can describe some of the groups they belong to, and do they connect this to their own identities.  This assessment task also connects to early stage 1 literacy outcomes for writing.  I would help students with writing their sentences by demonstrating writing my own sentence, and I would leave up on the board the starter 'I belong to many groups, ...', alongside the vocabulary word bank we already created together in the brainstorming activity. 

Lesson plans on the web such as this, are a growing source of valuable material available to teachers for their planning for teaching and learning.  Support materials and teaching ideas sourced from the internet, are a significant part of this growing concept of global education (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).  Teachers can share over the internet quality teaching programs, as a sort of collaborative professional learning environment.   

References:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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