The World Planet
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The World Planet
a web page on world events.
Curated by Louis Culotta
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Population Density

Population Density | The World Planet | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


Via Seth Dixon
Louis Culotta's insight:

This is a great map to show the populations of the world and the density of the people of the world are taking to much of the worlds resources are happening.

This map and the map of overfishing in the world go hand and hand together to show that something has to be done to deal with these world problems.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:23 PM

This interactive map shows the varying intensities of population density, and the first thing that I thought of was how low the population density is in my hometown, compared to some of the bigger cities or areas around the world.  I am from a rural area of Rhode Island, and there are plenty of farms near my home, as well as woods and ponds.  It really is a beautiful area, which made me think that if population densities were so high- the maximum density on the interactive map was over 500 people per square kilometer- that there would  be less room for the beauty of the natural world in those densely populated areas.  I grew up playing in my woods, and I am always shocked by city-dwellers that live in places where their yards have one or two trees (and are considered to live in 'woodsy' areas of their towns), or have no yards at all.  My town has a low population density, and much of the land is occupied by the reservoir, farms, and woodland areas that are not permissible for development.  Although my hometown is not a city, it serves the more populated areas- such as Providence- by providing water to their city.  It seems the more populated areas drain the surrounding areas of their natural beauty and resources.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:31 PM

Mindblowing interractive map dealing with the population desinty of the world.  From tinkering around with this ive seen some scary things. As we all know the North East metropolis area is compact with people from rhode island to delaware and everything in between. but when you take the map to 100 people per square to kilomete it almost disapears. This in itself wouldnt be that bad but when you move the image to 500 per kilometer almost the entireity of India is still there. This is a perfect compaitive example of how jam packed south eastern asia is and its actually pretty scary.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

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Facebook connections map the world

Facebook connections map the world | The World Planet | Scoop.it
Facebook intern Paul Butler has created a detailed map of the world by mapping connections between people using the social network living in different cities.

Via Seth Dixon
Louis Culotta's insight:

This is very cool...just like the internet map you posted. I have a seperate facebook page just to communicate back and forth to my friend nd his family in New Zealand in real time for free.

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Thomas C. Thompson's curator insight, April 27, 2013 8:25 PM

This is a picture of our world and the real way that we are connected in real time from Facebook. It's amazing! Share this everywhere!

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:23 PM

This map amazes me because of just how big Facebook has become after starting as a small site for college kids in the U.S. to connect on.  Now it is one of the largest contributing factors to globalization as it allows people from various continents to connect to others with a simple Internet connection.  It has helped people of different cultures come together and as we saw in class, it helps spread word of different political happenings that regular news media tries to hide from us.  

It's also really interesting to see how China is completely off the grid and so is central and Saharan Africa because in terms of modern day globalization, they are not areas that participate in many global affairs and with the prominence Facebook holds in today's world, the parts of the world that are missing are much stranger to us in cultural terms.

L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 4:26 AM

Global networks

 

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Weather Graphs and Maps

Weather Graphs and Maps | The World Planet | Scoop.it
WeatherSpark: beautiful weather graphs and maps making in-depth weather information easily accessible.

Via Seth Dixon
Louis Culotta's insight:

Thiis s some great information on weather stats and tracking storms statistics and seasonal trends of general weather events.Thanks

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Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, July 3, 2013 11:45 AM

Again, another great site for World Geography

Jose Sepulveda's comment, July 4, 2013 12:07 PM
Nice class material
David Madrid's curator insight, July 25, 2013 8:33 PM

Graficos y clima juntos

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What the Internet Looks Like

What the Internet Looks Like | The World Planet | Scoop.it
You are looking at, more or less, a portrait of the internet over an average 24 hours in 2012—higher usage in yellows and reds; lower in greens and blues—created by an anonymous researcher for the "Internet Census 2012" project.

Via Seth Dixon
Louis Culotta's insight:

if you ever wondered who online at any given time..check this out.

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Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 5:02 PM
Whoa. This is awesome. Never before had I seen internet usage across the globe before. I wasn’t too surprised by the map its showing. Obviously the United States and Europe would have the highest internet traffic of the world although I was quite surprised to see such massive internet activity in Central America, near Panama and Costa Rica. This data was collected illegally and it was interesting how they did it. It was a bot who hacked into Linux computers with no password (really…) or a default password (still really…) and then tracked their IPv4 address to see their activity. It was a non-threatening bot and they created a readme file on each computer that explained what it was doing however it was still an invasion of privacy and no matter how cool the map came out I cannot agree with their methods of obtaining this information. What interested me at first about this was activity in the Middle East. You can see a lot of activity in Turkey and around the Nile in Egypt, but other than that the rest of the region is fairly dim. It is unfortunate that is so because of how it could help people there, just look at the Arab Spring.
Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:51 AM
I found this collection of data very interesting. It reveals a number of different things about the internet across the world and the intensity of its usage.
Most obviously, perhaps, you can see what areas of the world have the most internet usage, or at least access. The areas of highest use seem to certainly match up with what you would expect: high internet usage and access in first world countries in Europe and in the United States, lower internet usage and access in more impoverished areas such as Africa and the Middle East. The amount of internet usage can also be seen increasing and decreasing as the animation moves from right to left, indicating the twenty four hour cycle of a day and presumably decreased internet usage during the night and increased usage during the day. This animation provides fascinating and valuable information about the internet in a unique geographic context. Economic geography is apparent in the concentration of internet usage, while physical geography is evident in the correlation between what parts of the world are accessing the internet at higher rates and when, in contrast to other parts of the world.
Thomas D's comment, May 2, 2013 11:32 AM
I find that this article of Internet usage is very interesting and somewhat helpful in understanding the development of countries. You can see from this that over a 24 hour period of time that the entire United States is lit up with a color. When over this 24 hour period there are places on the map that never once do you see a light or you only can see it for a small period of time. I think this goes to show how greatly our society depends on the Internet nowadays. That we basically use the internet or a computer for just about everything at all times of the day. That in some countries they are so underdeveloped that they barely have access to computers. According to this picture Africa is barely lit up and it’s mostly lit up in South Africa which is one of the growing countries in the world. I think this information although gathered illegally is very interesting to look at and see who uses the internet the most.