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Rewordify.com: Understand what you read

Rewordify.com: Understand what you read | The World of Reading | Scoop.it
Rewordify.com helps you understand more of what you read, faster. It translates hard English into easier English.
Sarah McElrath's insight:

This is an interesting site. You can put in text or a website and it will simplify the reading. It also has many of the classics rewordified. I have some mixed feelings on this -- the richness of the language (part of what makes a book a classic) is lost. Still, for understanding, it is helpful.

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6 Reasons Why Print Books Will Always Be Better

6 Reasons Why Print Books Will Always Be Better | The World of Reading | Scoop.it
Surprise, surprise. Literary writers prefer print....

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Interesting points by Google-lit-trips.

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 23, 10:23 AM

23 August 2014

 

One simple question. Would you consider using this article in class as an excellent example of "Informational Reading"?

 

I might, but not for the reasons you might expect.

 

__________

A PREFACE:  A clarification. It is not my intent to counter the pro-print and anti-E-book positions taken in this article. My intent is to call into question the tact taken by the article's writer (henceforth referencing the writer of the article in order to distinguish the article's author from the book authors referenced in the article).Had the author used the same tact, with the exception of presenting only evidence gleaned from pro-eBook writers, I would certainly have had as much to be concerned about  regarding its lack of balance.

__________

 

I might use this article as an exercise in determining when "informational reading represents an example of a writer being informed, misinformed, disinformed, or ill-informed.

 

My intent was to reference the writer of the article, however I suppose that it might also reference the authors who are the subject of the article as well.

 

My concerns...

 • The article's title is misleading. I had hoped that the writer might be writing an article representing a cross-section of authors who have preferences for reading traditional print or E-Books. 

 

__________

AN INTERESTING SIDEBAR: The previous comment refers to the title on the article as it was published on The Huffington Post (Click to the article above to see for yourself). When "scooped" for this blog, the title mysteriously changed to "6 Reasons why Print Books Will Always be Better." Having done my fair share of print production, I know that headlines are generally not the work of an article's author, but rather the product of the page layout person. The headline as published on The Huffington Post is misleading; the headline that appears at the top of this blog is at least more honest in that it does not hide the writer's bias.

__________

 

I've long had concerns about teachers who express to their students a preference (or skeptical opinion) of either format. Well intended as it may be, it is a personal opinion being passed off as an informed opinion. And, we live in a world where many, if not most, students from every ability level are still too often focused upon reflecting what they believe to be what the teacher wants them to believe, whether they do or not, is going to be on the test (or appreciated by the person who will eventually be handing out grades). Those who prefer "the other" media for their reading may well come to one of two conclusions; either perceiving themselves as in a minority of those "less respected" by the teacher or, in a class with a clueless teacher. This is disturbing in light of our goal of encouraging all students to value the wisdom articulated in great works of literature.

 

 • The writer then begins by clarifying the fact that the authors of whom she writes all share a particular grudge against Amazon, the major distributor of digital text. Their grudge, which may well be justified, is primarily based upon Amazon's policy of not making available books written by authors whose works are also sold by Amazon's primary competitor, Hachette. I suppose this is a reasonable concern since the  Amazon policy does punish the authors by reducing the distribution of their work. The authors become the rope being dragged through the mud in the tug-o-war between two corporations. So, unfair as it appears to be, the question is can authors be unbiased when asked about their preferences for reading media? I don't know. 

 

 • In spite of the headline's appearance of an implied promise to be fair and balanced, the writer clarifies in bold, but buried, text that her article will only represent authors who favor traditional print over digital media. 

 

Those authors articulate the traditional arguments in favor of traditional print, many of which are reasons that my own reading habits sometimes includes traditional print. I do love the ambiance that the wall of books in my den brings to the room. I do appreciate the feel of a book in my hands, the smell of an old book as I read an old classic. I like the "lendability" of printed books, (though I suppose that isn't a preference for many authors who would rather every reader by his or her own copy).

 

 • Another concern is that there is a common "jump to the conclusion" that authors have some special expertise on the subject. 

 

They may have some degree of expertise on quality of an author's writing. Though examples of famous author's distaste for other famous authors abound. (see: The 30 Harshest author on author insults in History: http://flavorwire.com/188138/the-30-harshest-author-on-author-insults-in-history)

 

It's pretty clear to anyone who happens to prefer E-Book reading that some of these authors are in fact ill -informed or inadequately experienced about reading E-Books. 

 

For example, like Lev Grossman, I too want to leave my kids a roomful of books, but reducing the act of reading E-books to "a chunk of plastic that they (the kids) have to guess the password to" would not pass muster in my class for representing an argument objectively. 

And, I don't even get the intent of his quoting Maurice Sendak's suggestion that there is a parallel between reading books and sex having only one kind PERIOD. Absurd. One of the most exciting trends in creating reading materials is the exploration being done by authors of many new concepts in packaging books.

 

Emma Straub, begins with her confession that she's never read an e-book. Well, I'd rather hear the opinions of authors who have invested time in learning a bit about the subject they have taken a very strong opinion about. I do agree with her that I don't find reading on my phone to be a preferable mode of reading. But, to suggest that reading on a phone is a counter argument of much value, in spite of the distinct differences between reading e-books on a phone and reading e-books on other devices. 

 

Anthony Doerr. If you feel that way, fine. Sometimes I have similar, but less intense preferences. However, having also spent a lot of time on my iPad I've come to understand that e-book modes of letting me know where I am in the book are pretty easy to get used to and have some distinct advantages. I would not have an opposing view if he'd indicated that he has issues with the difficulty of referencing pagination since unlike print books, pagination varies in e-books dependent upon font size options they have which brings both the consistent pagination problems but also the benefit of being able to adjust visual comfort. And, if his reference to making "scribbles of my passage" refers to the delightful activity of highlighting text and creating marginalia, Well, e-books beat the pants off of printed books, ah, IN MY OPINION.

 

And, his concern about the irritation he feels when getting "alerts blooming across the page announcing that it's your turn in Words With Friends," as clever as it seems at first indicates that he must not have phones that ring or an awareness of the preferences for controlling alerts  on digital devices. 

 

I must say that I was much less concerned about the comments of the last three authors included in this article.

Sue Monk Kidd presents her pro-print opinions without having to counterbalance them with questionably ill-informed opinions about e-book reading.

 

Elizabeth McCracken also restricts her comments to very specific reasons why she prefers print over e-Books in that dropping a paper book while reading in the bathtub is much less of a problem than dropping one's iPad while bathing. And, coffee spills and small children? Yes, these are arguments that with the exception of simply being careful, are understandable concerns.

 

Karen Russell prefers print over e-Books but makes the most sensible statement when she recognizes that "But writing an e-book has been an exciting experiment; it's the way so many people read now. [Print versus e-books] is sort of a funny rivalry."


The problem she mentions about feeling like a dinosaur for her preference is intriguing. I would hope that one's reading preferences would NOT make one feel like an outcast. Though, those of us with some concern about sustainability issues relating to the consumption of paper might feel a bit more concerned about the matter. 

 

But, with that exception, what is the advantage in a classroom of a teacher expressing his or her preference as though students with the "other preference" are outcasts and in an indefensible position?

 

Reading preferences are not like elections where one side wins if it can demonstrate a majority approval. The real "winners" are those who prefer reading regardless of preference for means of access.

 

 Our personal preferences in reading format are personal.

 

On the other hand, our professional preferences in reading format ought to be in promoting whatever means of accessing the great stories that each of our students find most engaging. This might simply be a recognition that individualizing our lesson design should consider THEIR reading access preferences not ours.

 

And, by the way, check out the graphic used to illustrate the article. A chalk board????? 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

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What Should I Read Next? Book recommendations from readers like you

What Should I Read Next? Book recommendations from readers like you | The World of Reading | Scoop.it
What Should I Read Next? Book recommendations from readers like you. Register for free to build your own book lists
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Help for those who don't know what to read next --when there is no librarian around to help them find something!

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BookBub: Free Ebooks - Great deals on bestsellers you'll love

BookBub: Free Ebooks - Great deals on bestsellers you'll love | The World of Reading | Scoop.it
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Prejudice / Discrimination - Social Issues - Books

Prejudice / Discrimination  - Social Issues - Books | The World of Reading | Scoop.it

AA Mighty Girl is the world's largest collection of books and movies for parents, teachers, and others dedicated to raising smart, confident, and courageous girls.

Sarah McElrath's insight:

Awesome.

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Our Top Eleven Nonfiction books for teaching...everything! | Burkins & Yaris

Our Top Eleven Nonfiction books for teaching...everything! | Burkins & Yaris | The World of Reading | Scoop.it
In this post, we share 11 nonfiction titles that we use over and over to teach just about everything that arises in our literacy classroom.
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Rewordify.com: Understand what you read

Rewordify.com: Understand what you read | The World of Reading | Scoop.it
Rewordify.com helps you understand more of what you read, faster. It translates hard English into easier English.
Sarah McElrath's insight:

This is an interesting site. You can put in text or a website and it will simplify the reading. It also has many of the classics rewordified. I have some mixed feelings on this -- the richness of the language (part of what makes a book a classic) is lost. Still, for understanding, it is helpful.

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Social emotional learning lessons - free ebook downloads

Social emotional learning lessons - free ebook downloads | The World of Reading | Scoop.it

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

A high quality archive of ebooks, monographs, chapters, brochures, and articles on social emotional learning from a variety of sources. A great deal of first-rate resources here.


Via Jim Lerman
Sarah McElrath's insight:

This site even includes popular titles -- such as Divergent--although to get the whole download, you need to pay. Could be helpful for "selling" the book to students. Read the first few chapters to hook them.

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Patrice McDonough's curator insight, April 18, 5:23 AM

I agree with Jim's insight...check this out teachers and parents. A wonderful way to engage learners for any subject.  This is teaching of the heart!

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Young Adult Horror | Horror Writers Association Blog

Young Adult Horror | Horror Writers Association Blog | The World of Reading | Scoop.it
Sarah McElrath's insight:

A blog by Jonathan Maberry. Many interviews with YA horror writers.

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School Library Lady

School Library Lady | The World of Reading | Scoop.it
Book reviews
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YA--both fiction and non-fiction.

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Teachers | Common Core

Teachers | Common Core | The World of Reading | Scoop.it

Book lists by grade, lesson plans, common core questions and answers.

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New Learning Times : Article Newsela

New Learning Times : Article Newsela | The World of Reading | Scoop.it

by Demetri Lales

 

"Newsela strives to complete two learning goals: the first is helping students improve their reading comprehension skills, and the second is teaching students about current events. The different Lexile levels open up the platform to a broad range of students who can manually adjust to the level that is right for them. Young students may find the ability to lower the Lexile level very valuable. It could enable them to understand current news more easily. Teachers may find the combinations of quizes and articles useful for testing students' reading comprehension levels."


Via Jim Lerman
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Amy Weisz's curator insight, February 19, 3:37 PM

Terrific resource for current events and close reading. 

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The Millions : Time to Put the Knives Away: An Interview with Rebecca Mead

The Millions : Time to Put the Knives Away: An Interview with Rebecca Mead | The World of Reading | Scoop.it

Rebecca Mead asks me what my favorite book is, and then she stops herself. “Having a favorite is a stupid thing,” she says. “It’s like asking a child his favorite color. Only children have favorites.” Of course this isn’t true. Committing to a favorite book is like committing to a relationship, which is to say that it carries no automatic promise of deepening your engagement with human life, and may impede it.

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Trailer for THE FAULT IN OUR STARS - BOOK RIOT

Trailer for THE FAULT IN OUR STARS - BOOK RIOT | The World of Reading | Scoop.it
The trailer for the movie adaptation of John Green's THE FAULT IN OUR STARS
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Love it.

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INCIDENTAL COMICS: Conflict in Literature

INCIDENTAL COMICS: Conflict in Literature | The World of Reading | Scoop.it

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Love it. 

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 10, 8:22 AM

10 August 2014

 

And there you have it. Great Literature  has always been Virtual Reality at its best. And, the best Fiction has always reflected humanity's deepest Truths. 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED a 501(c)(3) educational nonprofit

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Community: What Are Your Favorite YA Graphic Novels? | Blog | Epic Reads

Community: What Are Your Favorite YA Graphic Novels? | Blog | Epic Reads | The World of Reading | Scoop.it
 

With the release of Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book Vol 1.
Sarah McElrath's insight:

No one is too old for graphic novels. Love the combination of words and visuals. 

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The Best List of Reading Response Questions Ever.

The Best List of Reading Response Questions Ever. | The World of Reading | Scoop.it
When I was in the classroom, I used the workshop model.  After students read silently every day, I asked that they write in their reading response journal for just five minutes.  They could choose ...
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Awesome reading response questions that get kids using the higher Bloom's taxonomy levels.

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Read, Kids, Read

Read, Kids, Read | The World of Reading | Scoop.it
It’s not a chore. It’s a path to fulfillment that fewer are traveling.
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The benefits of reading. 

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Our Top Ten Fiction Books for Teaching....EVERYTHING! | Burkins & Yaris

Our Top Ten Fiction Books for Teaching....EVERYTHING! | Burkins & Yaris | The World of Reading | Scoop.it
In this post we share ten fiction titles that we use over and over again to help support children's reading growth and development.
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Reading is different online than off, experts say

Reading is different online than off, experts say | The World of Reading | Scoop.it
Our brains, neuroscientists warn, are developing new circuits with a big impact on non-digital reading
Sarah McElrath's insight:

"Will we become Twitter brains?” This so makes me think of Fahrenheit 451. Yikes!

 

"The students believed they did better on screen. They were wrong. Their comprehension and learning was better on paper."

 

"There are advantages to both ways of reading. There is potential for a bi-literate brain." What do we want to preserve and how do we preserve it?

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Expandedbooks.com

Expandedbooks.com | The World of Reading | Scoop.it
Expanded Books is dedicated to providing videos and podcasts about authors and books, covering all types of genres.
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Good book trailers.

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Horror in YA Lit is a Staple, Not a Trend

Horror in YA Lit is a Staple, Not a Trend | The World of Reading | Scoop.it
Though R. L. Stine and Christopher Pike may be our quickest associations with teen screams, horror encompasses a wide array of books. Teen librarian and blogger Kelly Jensen highlights the latest titles in teen fiction that are bound to give readers nightmares.
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Yup.  Horror is big in my middle schools.

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Celebrating National Poetry Month | The New York Review of Books

This April, to celebrate National Poetry Month, the Review's editors have chosen thirty poems from the archives and will post one each day. Please bookmark this page and visit us throughout the month for new poems. You can also follow @nybooks on Twitter or visit our Facebook page for a link to the day’s poem. For more poetry and reviews from our archives, you may be interested in the online edition, which provides full access to five decades of writing in the Review.

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An Essential Strategy in Developing Close Readers | MiddleWeb

An Essential Strategy in Developing Close Readers | MiddleWeb | The World of Reading | Scoop.it

by Sarah Tantillo

 

"The most important [close reading] skill you can teach your students is how to ask questions. To be effective at reading a text—any text: a story, a poem, a graph, a painting, an opera—you need to be able to ask good questions. As The Literacy Cookbook explains, questioning is an essential step in the comprehension process. Let’s review how it works:"


Via Jim Lerman
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Models this using Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief.

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Making Connections: Text to Self, Text to Text, Text to World - Diane Kardash

Making Connections:  Text to Self, Text to Text, Text to World - Diane Kardash | The World of Reading | Scoop.it

Schema theory explains how our previous experiences, knowledge, emotions, and understandings affect what and how we learn (Harvey & Goudvis, 2000). [ ] By teaching students how to connect to text they are able to better understand what they are reading (Harvey & Goudvis, 2000).

Sarah McElrath's insight:

Gives some ideas for assessment as well.

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Join ReadWorks

Join ReadWorks | The World of Reading | Scoop.it
You should check out ReadWorks.

I love their research-based reading comprehension curriculum, and you might too.

ReadWorks is a completely free resource—all you have to do is register!
Sarah McElrath's insight:

A free site full of leveled text along with lessons and comprehension activities.

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