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The seven lost sounds of the Maltese language - Malta Independent Online

The seven lost sounds of the Maltese language - Malta Independent Online | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it
The seven lost sounds of the Maltese languageMalta Independent OnlineQuite a large audience, well beyond the capacity of the Palazzo Santa Sofia hall, attended a very informative and entertaining talk yesterday about the seven sounds that have been...
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Thich Nhat Hanh's New Translation of the Prajñāpāramitā (Heart Sutra)

Thich Nhat Hanh's New Translation of the Prajñāpāramitā (Heart Sutra) | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it
It is not often that a great Zen master offers generations to come a radical re-translation of a sacred text. This new version of the Prajñāpāramitā is now on the Plum Village web site, along with ...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

It is not often that a great Zen master offers generations to come a radical re-translation of a sacred text.

This new version of the Prajñāpāramitā is now on the Plum Village web site, along with Thay’s explanation for why he wrote this new translation.

To appreciate the greatness of this new translation, there’s nothing quite like reading it side by side with the previous one:

Heart of the Prajñāpāramitā
(Plum Village Chanting Book, 2000)The Insight that Brings Us to the Other Shore
(Plum Village Web Site, 2014)The Bodhisattva Avolokita,
while moving in the deep course of
perfect understanding,
shed light on the five skandas
And found them equally empty.
After this penetration he overcame ill-being.Avalokiteshvara
while practicing deeply with
the Insight that Brings Us to the Other Shore,
suddenly discovered that
all of the five Skandhas are equally empty,
and with this realisation
he overcame all Ill-being.Listen, Shariputra,
form is emptiness, emptiness is form.
Form is not other than emptiness,
emptiness is not other than form.
The same is true with feelings, perceptions,
mental formations and consciousness.“Listen Sariputra,
this Body itself is Emptiness
and Emptiness itself is this Body.
This Body is not other than Emptiness
and Emptiness is not other than this Body.
The same is true of Feelings,
Perceptions, Mental Formations,
and Consciousness.Listen Shariputra,
all dharmas are marked with emptiness.
They are neither produced nor destroyed,
neither defiled nor immaculate,
neither increasing nor decreasing.“Listen Sariputra,
all phenomena bear the mark of Emptiness;
their true nature is the nature of
no Birth no Death,
no Being no Non-being,
no Defilement no Immaculacy,
no Increasing no Decreasing.Therefore, in emptiness there is neither form,
nor feeling, nor perceptions, nor mental formations, nor consciousness.“That is why in Emptiness,
Body, Feelings, Perceptions,
Mental Formations and Consciousness
are not separate self entities.No eye, no ear, no nose, no tongue, no body, no mind.
No form, no sound, no smell, no taste, no touch,
no objects of mind.
No realms of elements (from eyes to mind consciousness),The Eighteen Realms of Phenomena
which are the six Sense Organs,
the six Sense Objects,
and the six Consciousnesses
are also not separate self entities.no interdependent origins and no extinction of them.
(From ignorance to death and decay).The Twelve Links of Interdependent Arising
and their Extinction
are also not separate self entities.No ill-being, no cause of ill-being, no end of ill-being, and no path.
No understanding, no attainment.Ill-being, the Causes of Ill-being,
the End of Ill-being, the Path,
insight and attainment,
are also not separate self entities.Because there is no attainment,
the Bodhisattvas, grounded in perfect understanding,
Find no obstacles for their minds.
Having no obstacles, they overcome fear,
liberating themselves forever from illusion
and realizing perfect nirvana.Whoever can see this
no longer needs anything to attain.Bodhisattvas who practice
the Insight that Brings Us to the Other Shore
see no more obstacles in their mind,
and because there
are no more obstacles in their mind,
they can overcome all fear,
destroy all wrong perceptions
and realize Perfect Nirvana.All Buddhas in the past, present, and future,
thanks to this perfect understanding,
arrive at full, right, and universal enlightenment.All Buddhas in the past, present and future
by practicing
the Insight that Brings Us to the Other Shore
are all capable of attaining
Authentic and Perfect Enlightenment.Therefore one should know that perfect understanding
is the highest mantra,
the unequalled mantra,
the destroyer of ill-being,
the incorruptible truth.
A mantra of prajnaparamita should therefore be proclaimed:“Therefore Sariputra,
it should be known that
the Insight that Brings Us to the Other Shore
is a Great Mantra,
the most illuminating mantra,
the highest mantra,
a mantra beyond compare,
the True Wisdom that has the power
to put an end to all kinds of suffering.
Therefore let us proclaim
a mantra to praise
the Insight that Brings Us to the Other Shore.Gate, gate, paragate, parasamgate, bodhi svaha.
Gate, gate, paragate, parasamgate, bodhi, svaha.
Gate, gate, paragate, parasamgate, bodhi, svaha.
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Translating a Novel of Sadism - The New Yorker

Translating a Novel of Sadism - The New Yorker | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it
The long gap between the French and English editions of “A Sentimental Novel” stems partly from the book’s violent, sexual content.
Charles Tiayon's insight:


LUSTRATION BY JULIANNA BRION


“A Sentimental Novel,” the final published work of the avant-garde novelist and theorist Alain Robbe-Grillet, appeared in France four months before his death, in 2008, and in English translation last spring. The content of the novel contributed to the lag in its translation: “A Sentimental Novel” (reviewed this summer in Briefly Noted) is a compendium of Robbe-Grillet’s sadistic fantasies, which, he said, he had catalogued since adolescence. The work consists of two hundred and thirty-nine numbered paragraphs that form a sort of sadist’s rhapsody about the sexual initiation of a fourteen-year-old girl, Gigi. Gigi’s travails are recounted in exacting detail, against a lushly imagined mise-en-scène, with elaborate furnishings, torture devices, and a proliferation of young companions.


There are few printable passages, but here is one:

Towards the back wall, the one on which my languorous eyes alight most easily, I distinguish, in the foreground of a picture that is quickly revealed to be a forest landscape of vertical and rectilinear trunks, a sort of basin of water so clear it becomes almost immaterial, an oblong widening of a limpid spring, deep as a bathtub or deeper even, set between gray rounded rocks, soft to the touch, welcoming. A girl is sitting there on a stone polished with age, which to her represents the ideal bench, the water’s edge where her long legs dangle in the blue mirrored swirl of this lovely nymphaeum, as natural as it is picturesque, whose temperature must be identical to the air, and to the feminine charms themselves, undulating, liquid already, above the moving mirror and its unforeseen shivers.

The violence crescendos over a hundred and forty repetitive pages, saturating the mind with savage images that steadily override any effort to maintain a protective distance. I had not read the original French, and could therefore only judge the English translation: its descriptions were rendered in highly artful prose, its metaphors elegantly drawn, with a fluidity that can be tricky to preserve when French is translated into English. The novel’s brutality was deeply disturbing, particularly in conjunction with its polished control, and yet I couldn’t deny my admiration for its craftsmanship.

I had never heard of the translator, D. E. Brooke, but felt certain that this must not be the work of an amateur. Yet a Google search turned up nothing, which seemed odd, even given the name’s somewhat generic nature. It occurred to me that D. E. Brooke might be a pen name, considering the contents of the novel, but I had a hard time believing this. The translator makes a strong case in the introduction for the literary integrity of “A Sentimental Novel,” and criticizes the American publishers who turned it down, writing that their responses came “from a comfort zone of profound and habitual moral hypocrisy.” Surely the author of these words would not shrink away from publishing under his or her own name. I wrote to the publisher that finally accepted the book, Dalkey Archive Press, to ask if it could provide any information about Brooke. Dalkey confirmed that the translator had indeed published under a pseudonym, and that, unfortunately, was all it could tell me.

I set out to uncover the true identity of Brooke, not knowing what, exactly, I would do with the information if I found it. I wrote to several people connected to the French literary world, to ask if they had any knowledge of the translator. Their speculations about the translator’s identity were intriguing—one pointed out that “D. E. Brooke” has more than a passing resemblance to the name of the heroine of “Middlemarch”—but offered little to go on. I wrote to Dalkey again to ask whether Brooke would be willing to answer some questions by e-mail, which I would send by way of Dalkey, in order to protect the translator’s anonymity. Brooke agreed.

Our correspondence (lightly edited and condensed) follows.

***

Q: Why did you feel that it was important that this book be translated and published in the English-speaking world?

A: I remember sitting in a coffee shop with a writer friend who mentioned that Robbe-Grillet’s last novel remained untranslated in English, and that this was due to the disturbing nature of the material it contained. I said immediately that I would translate it. The reasons had less to do with the book’s contents than with my own history as a reader and my encounter with “La Jalousie” at age fifteen. It was a portal that introduced notions of narrative voice, authorial choice, and the reader’s relationship to text in ways that I had not considered, as I devoured my way through more conventional fiction that served a different purpose: allowing me to escape my reality at the time. Any number of other works by twentieth-century authors might have triggered similar reflections and explorations. Only, in my case, Alain Robbe-Grillet was the instigator and, as an adolescent, I remember the excitement produced by the book’s propositions: that it purportedly granted greater agency to the reader, supposedly bared the scaffolding of writing. These claims intrigued me and gave me a first taste of something. So my reasons for translating “Un Roman Sentimental” were, you could say, purely sentimental.

Q: How long did it take you to do the translation? What made the project financially possible?

A: How long did it take me? I wish I could give you a precise answer. Probably a little over a year. It will not come as news to you that translating obscure French novels is not what pays the rent. Still, one finds ways of making a living and of working on translations at the same time.

Q: What was it like to spend so much time with this text? Did it affect your state of mind at all?

A: As far as the book itself and the material, a few times I had to walk away and return in a steelier frame of mind to take up a particularly hair-raising passage. But, as you note, the text is literary, and there were pleasures in working with it. As translator, I am a filter for material: it travels through me. As such, there’s a residue, but it is difficult to qualify. At best, you might compare the book’s effect on me to its effect on any reader: certain images—many, in fact—remain in you, and surge forth unbidden, superimposing themselves in your mind’s eye on perfectly anodyne and serene scenes of everyday life.

Q: Why did you decide to publish the translation under a pseudonym? How, if at all, do you relate that decision to the “moral opprobrium” that characterized the reaction to the novel?

A: My decision to translate the book pseudonymously was unrelated to the possible reactions it might elicit in the United States or other English-speaking countries. It was, rather, necessitated by personal reasons having to do with my travels to parts of the world where association with the material could put me at risk.

Q: There is an element of beauty to the text. Did you ever feel any tension or conflict in replicating that stylized beauty when it was being employed to give life to such extraordinarily violent ideas?

A: Once I am translating, my intentions are to convey the tone of what is before me in as precise a language as possible. My task is limited to working with words.  In this novel, even though at times the material was difficult for me to sit with, it was the intricate sentences that were the focus of my attention. The scenes almost only emerged afterward.

That said, the literary qualities of the prose did not strike me as incongruous. Instead, this language produced a comforting distance, a rarefied space in which to work, functioning a little like a sheet of stained glass beyond which the action unfolded. If anything, this is what made the translation possible and pleasurable. I would not, I daresay, have been interested in translating the “Fifty Shades” version of the same narrative.

Q: What do you like about “A Sentimental Novel”?

A: What I liked is his lack of hypocrisy and the artfulness of the prose. Robbe-Grillet admitted that, in writing “A Sentimental Novel,” he was conveying the essence of fantasies he had entertained for decades, ever since he was a very young man. I am unconvinced that the only man on the planet with horrifying fantasies was Alain Robbe-Grillet. While there is primal revulsion at the rape of innocence and the various other crimes detailed in this story, conflating act and fantasy in assessing a work of this kind seems to me to reflect a generally upheld social lie that requires the weirder and more disquieting manifestations of the human psyche to be swept under the public rug. The book’s lack of hypocrisy is in direct proportion to the rarity of similar avowals, especially in established spheres of social privilege and influence. The resulting schism of minds burdened with shameful, unspoken secrets appears to me to do more damage than what can be laid at the doorstep of this novel, which by its very existence forces us to ponder our relationship to criminal thoughts and fantasies: whether we must not think bad thoughts, not share them, not be exposed to them; whether we must condemn them in ourselves and others; and whether they can even be curtailed or eliminated by these actions. Rather than disown his darkest psyche, Robbe-Grillet erects a shrine to it.

Q: So when you refer to the “habitual moral hypocrisy” of the public in the introduction, what, exactly, do you mean?

A: There are at least four or five answers I could give you, and I fear we would find ourselves wading deep into territory that philosophers who examine good and evil write books about. Nonetheless, here is one answer: in this world, where children are dying daily, killed by weapons made by First World nations, maimed, massacred, their real blood spilled, that anyone can get themselves worked up into a froth over a fable is mystifying to me.



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Should there be a TV channel just for sign language users?

Should there be a TV channel just for sign language users? | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it

This week a consultation by media industry regulator Ofcom comes to an end. It could lead to more funding for television programmes made in British Sign Language (BSL), if there is enough support. But should there be a dedicated sign language channel?

Other British minorities have television channels funded via government and the BBC licence fee. Gaelic speakers have BBC Alba where you can watch Gaelic versions of TV shows like Peppa Pig and the much anticipated drama Bannan, due to be broadcast later this month. In Wales, S4C delivers Welsh language television like its famous soap Pobol y Cwm and their nightly news, Newyddion.

Many are programmes created from scratch, made and presented by people who speak that language and brought up in the corresponding culture. Bar one or two exceptions, when sign appears on TV it's as a translation of a spoken English programme from an inset signer. But should there be a channel where the signing happens centre-screen, coming from the presenters and a deaf perspective?

On a dedicated BSL channel, the newsreader would sign, and half-time sports analysis would come from a sofa full of people using their hands rather than their mouths. Drama, children's programmes, and others would also be signed by the presenters or actors.

Continue reading the main storyStart Quote

Sign language recorded on camera is exactly the same as writing on paper - it is the only way of archiving our language and culture”

Brian DuffyDeaf film-maker

But Gaelic and Welsh are languages woven into the very fabric of the UK itself. They're part of its culture and its history. Is BSL on the same footing as these ancient languages?

BSL can be found in the UK's history though has only been around in force since the mid-1800s. But do we judge importance by the amount of time that's passed or in other ways?

See Hear, BBC Two's long-running sign language magazine programme gets around 200,000 weekly viewers. By way of comparison, BBC Alba and S4C together claim around 600,000 weekly viewers.

Though there are some estimates of up to 200,000, Ofcom's own research commissioned in 2006 estimates that 66,000 people understand sign language - that's more than the 58,000 who speak Scottish Gaelic. There are around 750,000 Welsh speakers in the UK.

Some say BSL is an endangered language and is being whittled away on several fronts. Cochlear implants, controversial in the deaf community, though life enhancing for some, are seen as shifting people away from being natural sign language users. The trend for closing down deaf schools is leading to deaf children being mainstreamed and learning by lip-reading English speakers, not by sign.

Though many would see medical solutions and equality in education as positives and logical progression, a large number of those in the deaf community prefer to think of themselves as a minority language community rather than disabled, and the idea that their culture might be "cured" is offensive. It's inescapably political.

About 5% of the BBC's coverage is signed either with an in-vision signer or a signing presenter, including Doctor Who

BBC Alba and S4C help keep their respective language and culture alive. So if BSL really is an endangered language then perhaps television, presented by sign language users, is needed more than ever.

The closest the UK has to a sign language channel comes from the British Sign Language Broadcasting Trust (BSLBT), who air their programmes online, as well as on Film4 during the day, and on the Community Channel. They make about 20 programmes per year and have employed many hundreds of deaf people behind and in front of the cameras.

BSLBT receives money from smaller channels, those with between 0.5 and 1% audience share, like Sky One or Dave, who opt to give them money instead of making their own signed content. Each channel pays 20,000 pounds, giving about a million pounds to the trust. The amount has not risen since BSLBT began in 2009 and this current consultation process by Ofcom seeks to find out if they should be receiving more money.

S4C gets £100m a year from the BBC and the Department of Culture, Media and Sport. BBC Alba receives around £15m each year from various sources, with a minimum of five hours of new content each week.

BSLBT's million pound budget makes programmes which typically draw 20,000 viewers on TV with more on the website.

Continue reading the main storyFind out more
  • Watch William Mager interviewing Ofcom's head of Content Policy for See Hear.

Deaf film-maker Brian Duffy has made and appeared in BSLBT programmes and is a passionate advocate of sign-presented TV. He says: "Language should be delivered in its natural form from a native speaker of this country, having it translated is not the same thing. In-vision signing is quite literally the language being pushed aside to the corner. That's an indication of the attitude we get from providers."

But Duffy also points out that, being a language of gestures, BSL cannot be written down like English, Gaelic and Welsh. He says: "Sign language recorded on camera is exactly the same as writing on paper - it is the only way of archiving our language and culture."

In making decisions about the future of television for deaf people, Ofcom faces a confusing picture. Not all deaf people use sign language, and the TV regulator says many more deaf people in the UK rely on subtitling rather than signing.

When, in the final of 2011's the Young Apprentice, the BBC ran live subtitles with a delay of five seconds, there was uproar. But when the BBC News channel decides to drop its scheduled 1pm BSL bulletin for breaking news coverage such as Nelson Mandela's funeral, they didn't get many complaints. Ofcom could be forgiven for thinking this means subtitles are far more important than sign language.

Whatever your views on the importance of BSL on television, they're worth sharing. Ofcom's review of signing arrangements closes at 5pm on Monday 22nd of September. In particular it will look at whether funding for BSLBT should start to rise with inflation. For more information follow thislink.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

This week a consultation by media industry regulator Ofcom comes to an end. It could lead to more funding for television programmes made in British Sign Language (BSL), if there is enough support. But should there be a dedicated sign language channel?

Other British minorities have television channels funded via government and the BBC licence fee. Gaelic speakers have BBC Alba where you can watch Gaelic versions of TV shows like Peppa Pig and the much anticipated drama Bannan, due to be broadcast later this month. In Wales, S4C delivers Welsh language television like its famous soap Pobol y Cwm and their nightly news, Newyddion.

Many are programmes created from scratch, made and presented by people who speak that language and brought up in the corresponding culture. Bar one or two exceptions, when sign appears on TV it's as a translation of a spoken English programme from an inset signer. But should there be a channel where the signing happens centre-screen, coming from the presenters and a deaf perspective?

On a dedicated BSL channel, the newsreader would sign, and half-time sports analysis would come from a sofa full of people using their hands rather than their mouths. Drama, children's programmes, and others would also be signed by the presenters or actors.

Continue reading the main storyStart Quote

Sign language recorded on camera is exactly the same as writing on paper - it is the only way of archiving our language and culture”

Brian DuffyDeaf film-maker

But Gaelic and Welsh are languages woven into the very fabric of the UK itself. They're part of its culture and its history. Is BSL on the same footing as these ancient languages?

BSL can be found in the UK's history though has only been around in force since the mid-1800s. But do we judge importance by the amount of time that's passed or in other ways?

See Hear, BBC Two's long-running sign language magazine programme gets around 200,000 weekly viewers. By way of comparison, BBC Alba and S4C together claim around 600,000 weekly viewers.

Though there are some estimates of up to 200,000, Ofcom's own research commissioned in 2006 estimates that 66,000 people understand sign language - that's more than the 58,000 who speak Scottish Gaelic. There are around 750,000 Welsh speakers in the UK.

Some say BSL is an endangered language and is being whittled away on several fronts. Cochlear implants, controversial in the deaf community, though life enhancing for some, are seen as shifting people away from being natural sign language users. The trend for closing down deaf schools is leading to deaf children being mainstreamed and learning by lip-reading English speakers, not by sign.

Though many would see medical solutions and equality in education as positives and logical progression, a large number of those in the deaf community prefer to think of themselves as a minority language community rather than disabled, and the idea that their culture might be "cured" is offensive. It's inescapably political.

About 5% of the BBC's coverage is signed either with an in-vision signer or a signing presenter, including Doctor Who

BBC Alba and S4C help keep their respective language and culture alive. So if BSL really is an endangered language then perhaps television, presented by sign language users, is needed more than ever.

The closest the UK has to a sign language channel comes from the British Sign Language Broadcasting Trust (BSLBT), who air their programmes online, as well as on Film4 during the day, and on the Community Channel. They make about 20 programmes per year and have employed many hundreds of deaf people behind and in front of the cameras.

BSLBT receives money from smaller channels, those with between 0.5 and 1% audience share, like Sky One or Dave, who opt to give them money instead of making their own signed content. Each channel pays 20,000 pounds, giving about a million pounds to the trust. The amount has not risen since BSLBT began in 2009 and this current consultation process by Ofcom seeks to find out if they should be receiving more money.

S4C gets £100m a year from the BBC and the Department of Culture, Media and Sport. BBC Alba receives around £15m each year from various sources, with a minimum of five hours of new content each week.

BSLBT's million pound budget makes programmes which typically draw 20,000 viewers on TV with more on the website.

Continue reading the main storyFind out more
  • Watch William Mager interviewing Ofcom's head of Content Policy for See Hear.

Deaf film-maker Brian Duffy has made and appeared in BSLBT programmes and is a passionate advocate of sign-presented TV. He says: "Language should be delivered in its natural form from a native speaker of this country, having it translated is not the same thing. In-vision signing is quite literally the language being pushed aside to the corner. That's an indication of the attitude we get from providers."

But Duffy also points out that, being a language of gestures, BSL cannot be written down like English, Gaelic and Welsh. He says: "Sign language recorded on camera is exactly the same as writing on paper - it is the only way of archiving our language and culture."

In making decisions about the future of television for deaf people, Ofcom faces a confusing picture. Not all deaf people use sign language, and the TV regulator says many more deaf people in the UK rely on subtitling rather than signing.

When, in the final of 2011's the Young Apprentice, the BBC ran live subtitles with a delay of five seconds, there was uproar. But when the BBC News channel decides to drop its scheduled 1pm BSL bulletin for breaking news coverage such as Nelson Mandela's funeral, they didn't get many complaints. Ofcom could be forgiven for thinking this means subtitles are far more important than sign language.

Whatever your views on the importance of BSL on television, they're worth sharing. Ofcom's review of signing arrangements closes at 5pm on Monday 22nd of September. In particular it will look at whether funding for BSLBT should start to rise with inflation. For more information follow thislink.

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El poder de la lengua: la traducción

El poder de la lengua: la traducción | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it

La traducción es un oficio, (si no un arte), tan viejo como la comunicación escrita, y tan imprescindible que sin ella cada cultura se habría mantenido aislada de la otra, como quistes dañinos que inundaran la superficie terrestre. Es un trabajo paciente y difícil, en el que a cada segundo se levanta una nueva disyuntiva, es preciso escoger el término exacto. No hay que olvidar que el lenguaje busca la precisión pero casi nunca la alcanza. Su ambigüedad, tan relacionada a, y condicionada por su naturaleza polisémica, es a un tiempo obstáculo y belleza.

Es asíque quien traduce no sólo busca acercarse al sentido que el autor del texto original quiere llevar a los receptores; sino además trata de comprender la percepción que tiene el autor de símismo. No me interpreten mal. Me explico.

Todo aquel que escribe con el afán de comunicar, lo hace sobre la certeza de que es una persona con el talento necesario para comunicar efectivamente. Por tanto, la mayoría aspira a que su texto no sea alterado en lo más mínimo, sino solamente transferido a otra lengua sin variaciones. Si, por casualidad, el autor conoce la lengua a la que se ha traducido su texto, generalmente no la domina, porque de otra forma lo habría escrito directamente “de su puño y letra”, como se decía en la época precibernética.

Por su parte, el traductor, que a su vez tiene la sensibilidad de un creador y el aplomo de quien conoce otro idioma, debe tomar decisiones entre apegarse estrictamente al texto original, o facilitar al receptor una mejor comprensión adaptando ciertas áreas del discurso original a las características del nuevo idioma.

A veces, el traductor se enfrenta a un autor dúctil, complaciente en cierto sentido; que privilegia la efectividad con la que su código debe ser recibido por el interlocutor en una lengua diferente. Es ahíque el clima de trabajo se torna agradable, la traducción fluye, el final casi siempre seráfeliz. Añádale al saldo positivo, que mientras se traduce se aprende de los más insospechados temas, se recibe información que de otra manera habría estado fuera de nuestro alcance.

Pero hay ocasiones en las que el autor no admite variaciones; tan extremo es su celo que no hay forma posible de hacer que su obra sea comprendida en otra lengua, porque va maniatada a las exigencias del autor y el idioma original. El resultado puede llegar a ser mediocre, el proceso desbastador para las energías físicas y mentales del traductor; y toda la operación puede llevar al fracaso.

Si han comprendido lo que aquíles cuento, ahora tendrán una mejor idea de las dificultades que se presentan a quienes nos ocupamos, entre otras cosas, de traducir. Bueno sería también que todos los clientes tuvieran igual actitud. En general, no me puedo quejar de los míos, pero ocasionalmente aparece alguien que necesita de nuestro trabajo al tiempo que lo menosprecia y, por supuesto, no estádispuesto a honrar el precio que conlleva.

Si conocen a alguien asíy han entendido lo que aquíles he dicho, por favor ayúdennos para que todos vivamos en paz, y podamos comunicarnos en diferentes idiomas con la mayor eficiencia. Y una cosa más, aunque vaya en contra de los intereses del negocio: no pierda ocasión de aprender idiomas, no uno ni dos sino todos los que pueda. Ser bilingüe hace algún tiempo era un gran mérito. Hoy los empleos mejor remunerados exigen más de dos idiomas. Y un mundo que no se comunique no progresa. Ese es mi mejor consejo para esta semana lluviosa y para todas las que siguen.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

La traducción es un oficio, (si no un arte), tan viejo como la comunicación escrita, y tan imprescindible que sin ella cada cultura se habría mantenido aislada de la otra, como quistes dañinos que inundaran la superficie terrestre. Es un trabajo paciente y difícil, en el que a cada segundo se levanta una nueva disyuntiva, es preciso escoger el término exacto. No hay que olvidar que el lenguaje busca la precisión pero casi nunca la alcanza. Su ambigüedad, tan relacionada a, y condicionada por su naturaleza polisémica, es a un tiempo obstáculo y belleza.

Es asíque quien traduce no sólo busca acercarse al sentido que el autor del texto original quiere llevar a los receptores; sino además trata de comprender la percepción que tiene el autor de símismo. No me interpreten mal. Me explico.

Todo aquel que escribe con el afán de comunicar, lo hace sobre la certeza de que es una persona con el talento necesario para comunicar efectivamente. Por tanto, la mayoría aspira a que su texto no sea alterado en lo más mínimo, sino solamente transferido a otra lengua sin variaciones. Si, por casualidad, el autor conoce la lengua a la que se ha traducido su texto, generalmente no la domina, porque de otra forma lo habría escrito directamente “de su puño y letra”, como se decía en la época precibernética.

Por su parte, el traductor, que a su vez tiene la sensibilidad de un creador y el aplomo de quien conoce otro idioma, debe tomar decisiones entre apegarse estrictamente al texto original, o facilitar al receptor una mejor comprensión adaptando ciertas áreas del discurso original a las características del nuevo idioma.

A veces, el traductor se enfrenta a un autor dúctil, complaciente en cierto sentido; que privilegia la efectividad con la que su código debe ser recibido por el interlocutor en una lengua diferente. Es ahíque el clima de trabajo se torna agradable, la traducción fluye, el final casi siempre seráfeliz. Añádale al saldo positivo, que mientras se traduce se aprende de los más insospechados temas, se recibe información que de otra manera habría estado fuera de nuestro alcance.

Pero hay ocasiones en las que el autor no admite variaciones; tan extremo es su celo que no hay forma posible de hacer que su obra sea comprendida en otra lengua, porque va maniatada a las exigencias del autor y el idioma original. El resultado puede llegar a ser mediocre, el proceso desbastador para las energías físicas y mentales del traductor; y toda la operación puede llevar al fracaso.

Si han comprendido lo que aquíles cuento, ahora tendrán una mejor idea de las dificultades que se presentan a quienes nos ocupamos, entre otras cosas, de traducir. Bueno sería también que todos los clientes tuvieran igual actitud. En general, no me puedo quejar de los míos, pero ocasionalmente aparece alguien que necesita de nuestro trabajo al tiempo que lo menosprecia y, por supuesto, no estádispuesto a honrar el precio que conlleva.

Si conocen a alguien asíy han entendido lo que aquíles he dicho, por favor ayúdennos para que todos vivamos en paz, y podamos comunicarnos en diferentes idiomas con la mayor eficiencia. Y una cosa más, aunque vaya en contra de los intereses del negocio: no pierda ocasión de aprender idiomas, no uno ni dos sino todos los que pueda. Ser bilingüe hace algún tiempo era un gran mérito. Hoy los empleos mejor remunerados exigen más de dos idiomas. Y un mundo que no se comunique no progresa. Ese es mi mejor consejo para esta semana lluviosa y para todas las que siguen.

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WIPO launches unique Image-based search functionality - SiNApSE

WIPO launches unique Image-based search functionality - SiNApSE | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it

In its progressing efforts to provide better Intellectual Property Services, World Intellectual Property Organisation (‘WIPO’) has introduced an image based search functionality in the Global Brand database’s users with an objective of “Every country. Every Brand. One search”. It adds an important new search possibility for the Global Brand database’s users, who often wish to see if a logo, device mark, trademark or other similar images are separately registered for use.

What is the Global Brand database?

The Global Brand database is a free database released by the WIPO in March, 2011 as part of the WIPO Global Intellectual Property search system. The Global Brand database is comprised of 10.9 million records relating to internationally protected trademarks, appellations of origin and armorial bearings, flags and other state emblems as well as the names, abbreviations and emblems of intergovernmental organizations.

The quick & easy way to use image search technology complements the database and other querying criteria, including Vienna Classification codes, trademarks holders’ names, countries of origin and others. For example, users can simply upload a proposed logo and quickly get other protected registered images that may be similar, filtered from more than 4 million images contained in 15 national and international collections in practically no time.

The new search engine may be accessed from here.

Enjoy Trademark Searching!

Charles Tiayon's insight:

In its progressing efforts to provide better Intellectual Property Services, World Intellectual Property Organisation (‘WIPO’) has introduced an image based search functionality in the Global Brand database’s users with an objective of “Every country. Every Brand. One search”. It adds an important new search possibility for the Global Brand database’s users, who often wish to see if a logo, device mark, trademark or other similar images are separately registered for use.

What is the Global Brand database?

The Global Brand database is a free database released by the WIPO in March, 2011 as part of the WIPO Global Intellectual Property search system. The Global Brand database is comprised of 10.9 million records relating to internationally protected trademarks, appellations of origin and armorial bearings, flags and other state emblems as well as the names, abbreviations and emblems of intergovernmental organizations.

The quick & easy way to use image search technology complements the database and other querying criteria, including Vienna Classification codes, trademarks holders’ names, countries of origin and others. For example, users can simply upload a proposed logo and quickly get other protected registered images that may be similar, filtered from more than 4 million images contained in 15 national and international collections in practically no time.

The new search engine may be accessed from here.

Enjoy Trademark Searching!

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Lost in translation: Helping Eritrean refugees in Israeli hospitals

Lost in translation: Helping Eritrean refugees in Israeli hospitals | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it
A new program in medical translation at Tel Aviv University is training translators to help the Eritrean refugees in Israeli hospitals.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Seeking medical attention can be difficult enough, but it’s even harder when you don’t speak the language.

A new program in medical translation at Tel Aviv University is training translators in order to help the sizable Eritrean refugee population in central Israel communicate when they end up in hospitals and clinics.

Michal Schuster, who is with the program, tells us exactly how it works and whether there are plans to expand.

We also speak to one of the students taking the course, Daniel, who works at a clinic for uninsured people in Tel Aviv.

 

This is a segment from So Much to Say: Listen to the full show.

 

 

Photo: Members of the Eritrean community during the 23rd Eritrean Independence Day 

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Nigeria: Boosting Literacy Development in Nigeria

Nigeria: Boosting Literacy Development in Nigeria | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it
September 8 is globally celebrated as International Literacy Day. It is a day set aside to draw attention to the importance and impact of literacy skills on individuals, communities, and societies. Since the day was first celebrated in 1946, on every 8 September, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, UNESCO, requests governments, employers, trades unions and other key global organizations to get involved and appreciate the importance of being able to read and write. The them
Charles Tiayon's insight:

September 8 is globally celebrated as International Literacy Day. It is a day set aside to draw attention to the importance and impact of literacy skills on individuals, communities, and societies. Since the day was first celebrated in 1946, on every 8 September, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, UNESCO, requests governments, employers, trades unions and other key global organizations to get involved and appreciate the importance of being able to read and write. The theme of the 2014 edition is "Literacy and Sustainable Development". Without doubt, literacy opens up a window of opportunities to everyone, and is essential to individual and societal development. For a society to attain sustainable development, social development and environmental integration, literacy is one of the required key elements.

The general perceptive of literacy is ability to read and write. But, literacy has bigger dimensions than mere ability to read and write. According to former United Nations Secretary General, Dr Kofi Anan, "Literacy is a bridge from misery to hope. It is a basic tool for daily life in modern society. It is a wall against poverty, and a building block of development. Literacy is a vehicle for the promotion of cultural and national identity". The import of this is that literacy is central to basic education for all, and indispensable for dropping child mortality, achieving gender equality and ensuring sustainable development, peace and democracy in the society. For individuals, families, and societies alike, it is an instrument of empowerment to improve one's health, one's income, and one's relationships.

Available data indicates that there are now close to four billion literate people in the world. In as much as this represents a positive stride, literacy for all is still a yet to be accomplished objective. A recent UNESCO statistics shows that 774 million adults still cannot read or write - two-thirds of them (493 million) are women. Among youth, 123 million are illiterate of which 76 million are female.

In Nigeria, in-spite of efforts by all tiers of governments to address rising illiteracy level, there has not been a progressive increase in the literary level, especially among the adults. According to the National Bureau of Statistics, adult illiteracy rate in Nigeria stands at 56.9%. The implication of this is that about 70% of Nigerians are illiterates. Considering the fact that globally the illiteracy rate is approximately 20% , the Nigerian situation is rather disturbing. Expectedly, the states mostly affected by the Boko Haram insurgents in the northern part of the country recorded the lowest literacy level in the country.

The Country Comparison Index of Literacy Level by country in 2012 further testifies to the worrisome literacy situation in the country as it shows that Nigeria ranked 161 out of 184 countries with 66 per cent literacy rate. This implies that we belong to the mainstream of the world's most illiterate countries. A recent USAID study also indicates that an estimated 10 million Nigerian children are not registered in school. A recent disclosure by the Minister of State for Education, Chief Nyesom Wike, equally indicates that the number of adults who cannot read and write in the country is estimated at 60 million, which is about 38% of the country's population estimated at 170 million. Wike made the revelation at the flagging off of the 2014 International Literacy Day.

At the 2013 edition of same event Wike disclosed that adult illiterates rate in the country have increased from 25 million in 1997 to 35 million in 2013. Wike further disclosed that the declining fortune of literacy ratio among children is embarrassing to the nation. According to him, Nigeria had over 10.5 million children out of school. In same vein, the current Education for All, EFA, Global Monitoring report ranks Nigeria as one of the countries with the highest level of illiteracy. The EFA report on Nigeria affirmed that the number of illiterate adults has increased by 10 million over the past two decades, to reach 35 million.

The current trend, if not quickly halted, could obstruct the attainment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG's). As it has been earlier asserted, literacy is vital o the achievement of every growth index. The way things stand, the objective of meeting the national mark of reducing illiteracy by 50% by 2015 seems largely unattainable.

The occasion of the 2014 World Literacy Day is, therefore, quite timely as it offers another golden chance for all stakeholders to reflect on the country's literacy state and make appropriate concerted efforts that could ensure the realization of the national mass literacy project. The successful accomplishment of the mass literacy project could only be made possible with the participation of appropriate governmental and non-governmental organizations. This is in view of the wide scope and profound benefits of the project.

Perhaps, the most compelling way to tackle the myriad of challenges confronting us as a nation is to urgently attend to the declining literacy position in the country. To successfully confront poverty, disease, religious fanaticism, political chaos, ethnic bigotry, gender discrimination, economic depression among others, efforts must be made by all to enhance the literary level in the country. Importantly, governments at all levels need to make pragmatic legislation as well as improved funding for the relevant agencies of government saddled with the execution of the mass literacy programme. Equally, literacy inclined groups and other related NGOs ought to step up activities and campaigns to increase awareness towards the importance of literacy.

The various States Universal Basic Education Boards, SUBEB, need to intensify efforts to ensure that no child is left out in the mass literacy drive. To this end, all the states need to strictly adhere to the spirit and principle of the Child Rights Law which criminalizes denial of access to any child to school. In the words of former United States of America President, Bill Clinton, during the celebration of International Literacy Day in 1994, "literacy is not a luxury; it is a right and a responsibility. If our world is to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century we must harness the energy and creativity of all our citizens."

- Ogunbiyi, a public affairs commentator, wrote in from Alausa, Ikeja.

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Assemblée nationale : Les débats traduits dans 6 langues à partir de novembre

Les langues nationales seront plus présentes à l’Assemblée nationale à partir de novembre prochain. L’Institution parlementaire a recruté 21 interprètes de conférence qui vont traduire les travaux dans 6 langues nationales.

21 interprètes de conférence vont traduire les débats à l’Assemblée nationale à partir du mois de novembre dans 6 langues nationales. L’annonce a été faite, avant-hier, à Dakar par le président de cette institution, Moustapha Niasse. «Sur les 23 langues nationales codifiées, nous en avons sélectionnées six : le Pulaar, le Soninké, le mandingue, le sérère, le diola et le wolof. Ces langues seront maintenant utilisées à l’Assemblée nationale », a déclaré le président de l’Assemblée nationale lors de la visite qu’il a effectuée à l’Ecole supérieure de management touristique et de langues appliquées (Estel) qui abrite la session de formation des jeunes interprètes.

Les 21 interprètes ont été sélectionnés après un appel à candidature. Selon le président de l’Assemblée nationale, ils vont faire un stage de 9 mois sur l’interprétation simultanée quelle que soit la langue qui sera utilisée pour exprimer des idées au Parlement. « Après six mois de formation, les interprètes sont opérationnels. Ils vont travailler à l’Assemblée nationale comme interprètes de conférence faisant partie du personnel permanent de l’Assemblée nationale », a souligné le président de l’institution parlementaire. Le recrutement et la formation des jeunes interprètes sont le fruit d’un partenariat entre l’Assemblée nationale et l’Union européenne. « Les 2/3 du projet ont été financés par l’Union européenne, le 1/3 par l’Assemblée nationale », a précisé Moustapha Niasse qui ajoute que le projet permet aux jeunes sénégalais d’accéder à un emploi de qualité. Ces jeunes pourront aussi servir au Conseil économique social et environnemental (Cese) et au ministère des Affaires étrangères.

Moustapha Niasse a rappelé que c’est le président Macky Sall, alors président de l’Assemblée nationale qui avait enclenché le processus pour la traduction simultanée des débats dans les langues nationales. « L’Afrique ne se développera qu’à partir de ses langues nationales. Au Sénégal, on doit apprendre l’algèbre, la géométrie et l’histoire, dans nos langues nationales. Cela n’exclut pas  l’usage de la langue française. Toutes les théories, quelque soit la spécialisation concernée, doivent être maîtrisées par la jeunesse sénégalaise dans nos langues nationales », a dit M. Niasse.

Babacar DIONE




"Le Soleil", le quotidien de référence, le journal des décideurs !
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Les langues nationales seront plus présentes à l’Assemblée nationale à partir de novembre prochain. L’Institution parlementaire a recruté 21 interprètes de conférence qui vont traduire les travaux dans 6 langues nationales.

21 interprètes de conférence vont traduire les débats à l’Assemblée nationale à partir du mois de novembre dans 6 langues nationales. L’annonce a été faite, avant-hier, à Dakar par le président de cette institution, Moustapha Niasse. «Sur les 23 langues nationales codifiées, nous en avons sélectionnées six : le Pulaar, le Soninké, le mandingue, le sérère, le diola et le wolof. Ces langues seront maintenant utilisées à l’Assemblée nationale », a déclaré le président de l’Assemblée nationale lors de la visite qu’il a effectuée à l’Ecole supérieure de management touristique et de langues appliquées (Estel) qui abrite la session de formation des jeunes interprètes.

Les 21 interprètes ont été sélectionnés après un appel à candidature. Selon le président de l’Assemblée nationale, ils vont faire un stage de 9 mois sur l’interprétation simultanée quelle que soit la langue qui sera utilisée pour exprimer des idées au Parlement. « Après six mois de formation, les interprètes sont opérationnels. Ils vont travailler à l’Assemblée nationale comme interprètes de conférence faisant partie du personnel permanent de l’Assemblée nationale », a souligné le président de l’institution parlementaire. Le recrutement et la formation des jeunes interprètes sont le fruit d’un partenariat entre l’Assemblée nationale et l’Union européenne. « Les 2/3 du projet ont été financés par l’Union européenne, le 1/3 par l’Assemblée nationale », a précisé Moustapha Niasse qui ajoute que le projet permet aux jeunes sénégalais d’accéder à un emploi de qualité. Ces jeunes pourront aussi servir au Conseil économique social et environnemental (Cese) et au ministère des Affaires étrangères.

Moustapha Niasse a rappelé que c’est le président Macky Sall, alors président de l’Assemblée nationale qui avait enclenché le processus pour la traduction simultanée des débats dans les langues nationales. « L’Afrique ne se développera qu’à partir de ses langues nationales. Au Sénégal, on doit apprendre l’algèbre, la géométrie et l’histoire, dans nos langues nationales. Cela n’exclut pas  l’usage de la langue française. Toutes les théories, quelque soit la spécialisation concernée, doivent être maîtrisées par la jeunesse sénégalaise dans nos langues nationales », a dit M. Niasse.

Babacar DIONE




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LA GRANDE AVENTURE DU FRANÇAIS:Comment le dialecte des rois est devenu le français

LA GRANDE AVENTURE DU FRANÇAIS:Comment le dialecte des rois est devenu le français | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it
L'ancien dialecte des rois de France aurait pu devenir notre langue commune. Il a été imposé comme langue unique. Au nom de valeurs "universelles" parfois contestables...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Le Français le plus célèbre du monde n'est pas connu sous son vrai nom. Napoléon est en effet né Napoleone di Buonaparte. Mais voilà : en France, on "parisianise" les noms de famille. C'est ainsi : dans notre beau pays, les rapports entre la langue et l'Etat sont particuliers.Il est vrai que, dans la lente apparition de notre Etat-nation, la langue a toujours constitué un enjeu majeur. Pour une raison simple à comprendre : chez nous, l'unité politique a précédé l'unité linguistique, ce qui n'est pas le cas de l'Allemagne ou de l'Italie.  

Pour ne rien arranger, l'idéologie s'en est mêlée. Les révolutionnaires se sont persuadés que la pensée nouvelle ne pouvait s'exprimer qu'en français. Dans le même mouvement, ils ont associé l'Ancien Régime aux langues régionales, "des idiomes grossiers qui ne peuvent servir que le fanatisme et les contre-révolutionnaires", selon l'expression du conventionnel Bertrand Barère. Ils ne se sont pas contentés, comme la monarchie, d'instaurer le français comme langue de l'administration. Ils ont considéré qu'il fallait l'imposer au peuple. 

L'abbé Grégoire publie ainsi, le 16 prairial an II, son célèbre rapport sur "la nécessité et les moyens d'anéantir les patois" - "anéantir"! -, où il note avec effarement que le français n'est parlé que dans une quinzaine de départements (sur 83). Le terme "patois" est conforme aux préjugés des élites de l'époque, fussent-elles les plus éclairées.  


L'école telle qu'instituée par Jules Ferry, en 1881.

© Jacques Pavlovsky/Sygma/Corbis


Dans son Encyclopédie, d'Alembert choisit ainsi cette définition : "Patois : langage corrompu tel qu'il se parle dans presque toutes les provinces. On ne parle la langue que dans la capitale." Des a priori qui perdurent aujourd'hui. Qui étudie Frédéric Mistral, prix Nobel de littérature en 1904 pour une oeuvre écrite en provençal ? Qui connaît le poète languedocien Pierre Goudelin (Pèire Godolin, de son vrai nom), considéré au XVIIe siècle comme l'égal d'Homère et de Ronsard? 

"La Révolution a donné la parole à la bourgeoisie"

Ceci excuse-t-il cela ? La Révolution mène cette politique culturellement criminelle au nom de sentiments nobles. On prétend "élever" le peuple en lui donnant accès à la "meilleure" langue. On entend réduire la fracture entre les masses et la classe supérieure, qui accède aux places et au savoir grâce à sa maîtrise du français. 

Quelques esprits marginaux proposent pourtant d'atteindre l'égalité par une autre voie : le français comme langue commune, et non comme langue unique. Ce plurilinguisme sera rejeté au nom de l'unité, confondue avec l'uniformisation. D'où ce paradoxe, souligné par le lexicographe Alain Rey : "La Révolution prétendait donner la parole au peuple. Linguistiquement, elle l'a donnée à la bourgeoisie." 

La Révolution sera cependant trop brève pour permettre de traduire les idées de l'abbé Grégoire dans la réalité. Qu'à cela ne tienne : les régimes suivants s'en chargeront. L'Empire d'abord (dans les lycées, créés par Napoléon, le français est seule langue d'éducation). La Restauration, ensuite ("il faut absolument détruire le langage breton", écrit en 1831 le ministre de l'Instruction publique à ses préfets). La République, enfin. 

Le spectre de la Belgique, minée par sa querelle entre Flamands et Wallons

C'est la IIIe du nom qui, dans ce domaine, se révélera la plus efficace. Là encore, Jules Ferry et ses contemporains agissent avec des sentiments élevés. Tout comme la colonisation prétend "civiliser les races inférieures", l'école publique est censée élever tous les Français au rang de citoyens. Et, en bonne logique républicaine, cet objectif ne saurait être atteint que par le français, seul porteur de valeurs universelles, tandis que les parlers régionaux sont supposés enfermer leurs locuteurs dans un dangereux communautarisme.  

Un raisonnement spécieux, relevé notamment par l'historienne Mona Ozouf (Composition française, Gallimard). "L'école, au nom de l'universel, humiliait la particularité. Mais l'école ne professait-elle pas en réalité sans le dire une particularité aussi, la française, qu'elle dissimulait sous le manteau de l'universel?" 

Il n'empêche : cette interprétation domine toujours aujourd'hui. Ainsi, en 1992, seul le français entre dans la Constitution. Ce nouvel alinéa de l'article 2, introduit notamment pour protéger notre langue contre l'anglais au moment de la mise en place du grand marché européen, va se retourner contre... les langues régionales. En 1999, le Conseil constitutionnel l'invoque en effet pour interdire la ratification de la charte européenne les concernant. Celles-ci finiront bien par faire leur apparition dans la loi fondamentale, en 2008, mais simplement au titre de "patrimoine de la France". Un article qui ne leur apportera rien de concret. 

Depuis une cinquantaine d'années, pourtant, les gouvernements ont changé de discours et même de pratique à leur égard. Ici ou là, on peut les apprendre à l'école. Très symboliquement, la délégation générale à la langue française s'occupe aussi "des langues de France". Mais aucun ministre n'a osé prendre les seules mesures qui modifieraient radicalement leur situation : leur utilisation massive dans l'enseignement, les entreprises et les administrations. Pendant des siècles, l'Etat français a planifié leur disparition. Aujourd'hui, il les laisse simplement mourir... 

Pour se justifier, les tenants du jacobinisme culturel évoquent le spectre de la Belgique, "minée" par sa querelle entre Flamands et Wallons, et de l'Espagne, "menacée" par les identités basque et catalane. L'argument est sérieux. Mais, curieusement, les mêmes oublient volontiers la Suisse qui, comme des dizaines de pays, vit paisiblement avec plusieurs langues officielles. Quand ils ne se contredisent pas en exigeant, pour les francophones du Québec, des mesures que Paris refuse sur son sol pour ses propres langues minoritaires. 

Oui, décidément, dans notre beau pays, les rapports entre la langue et l'Etat sont particuliers... 

À principes nouveaux, vocabulaire nouveau


La place de la Concorde, ex-place de la Révolution.

AFP PHOTO / JOEL SAGET


En politique, les mots sont des armes. Les révolutionnaires de 1789 l'ont bien compris. Malgré les guerres extérieures, malgré les révoltes sociales, malgré les soubresauts incessants, la maîtrise de la langue reste à leurs yeux une priorité. Et tous les domaines sont concernés : les noms des villes (Fontenay-le-Comte devient Fontenay-le-Peuple) ; ceux des espaces publics (la place Louis-XV, future place de la Concorde, devient place de la Révolution) ; le calendrier (vendémiaire, pluviôse,floréal, fructidor...) ; "citoyen" et "citoyenne" remplacent "monsieur" et "madame". Le tutoiement est institué. Les poids et mesures sont unifiés, avec l'adoption du système métrique. Tout cela est pensé : en se rendant maître du vocabulaire, il s'agit de rompre avec les valeurs de l'Ancien Régime et de conquérir les esprits. De la "race des seigneurs" exaltée par Hitler aux "ennemis du peuple" dénoncés par Lénine, bien des régimes reprendront ce procédé dans les décennies qui suivront. 


En savoir plus sur http://www.lexpress.fr/culture/comment-le-dialecte-des-rois-est-devenu-le-francais_1562979.html#6z5JqgOf5t35kBhC.99

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Q&A: Geneva Smitherman, Michigan State professor emerita of English, on the study of African American English

Q&A: Geneva Smitherman, Michigan State professor emerita of English, on the study of African American English | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it
Smitherman, a professor emerita of English at Michigan State University, has devoted her career to understanding the intersection of language, culture and race.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Q: Has this scholarly work had any broader impact?

The work of linguists has had some impact on lessening the stigmatization of African American Language. For instance, states no longer require that prospective teachers pass a speech test in pronouncing English in the Language of Wider Communication (aka Standard English) as I had to do back when I was studying to become a teacher. (As a speaker of African American Language, I failed the speech test and was assigned to take speech therapy before retaking the test.) However, demonstrating the systematic, rule-governed nature of African American Language has not eradicated the stigma, as evidenced, for example, by reaction to the Oakland, California School Board’s Resolution on Ebonics in 1996; as evidenced by teachers — and students — in the recent research of Dr. April Baker-Bell at some high schools in Detroit as she sought to teach students about the rules and history of African American Language; as evidenced in my recent experience in a workshop for teachers at a large Midwestern University where most were easily convinced of the benefits of students being able to speak a language other than English, but many were not convinced of the benefits of students being able to speak more than one variety of English, particularly if one of the varieties was African American Language (or “Spanglish”); and as evidenced by the “well-meaning” teacher we describe in the last chapter of “Articulate While Black,” who says that the African American Language-speaking kids’ parents might let them “get away” with speaking “like that,” but here it’s “unacceptable.”

Q: You seem to be describing a process of transition in terms of people’s understanding — and acceptance of – non-standard dialects.

Yes. This is not to say that there hasn’t been progress from the work of linguists on the systematic nature of African American Language (and other marginalized varieties). Particularly in the decades of the 1960s-90s, evidence-based research — for example, my 20-year writing study of African American high school seniors — indicated that the linguists’ work had had some positive impact on teachers’ language attitudes. However, today, in 2014, when it comes to language diversity, there’s been some serious back-slidin–or maybe back to where some folks ain nevah left from! The lesson that many of us linguists have had to learn is that attitudes toward language varieties are, at bottom, attitudes toward the people who speak these varieties. As we argue in “Articulate While Black: “Although little acknowledged in [these] public discussions, what usually lies behind comments like “Black Language is nothing but a lazy, ignorant way of speaking” are racist beliefs about Black people themselves as “lazy” and “ignorant.” (Hatin on a particular language is linked to hating its speakers, straight up.)” . My brilliant, young co-author, Dr. H. Samy Alim, of Stanford, coined the term “languaging race” to reference this sociolinguistic phenomenon.

Q: We now have a black president. What affect has he had on the acceptance of different dialects of English – and particularly African American English?

Folks certainly respect President Obama for his mastery of “standard English,” but he is more often admired as a linguistic role model for his ability to shift in and out of different ways of speaking. He recognizes Black ways of speaking as valued symbols of identity and solidarity for members of the Black community. From the basketball courts to the campaign trail to the pews of Trinity United Church of Christ to the barbershops of South Side Chicago to the White House, Barack regularly switches back and forth between multiple ways of speaking–without devaluing any of them. In this sense, he serves as a linguistic role model, not just for Black Americans, but for all Americans.

Nonetheless, the work of developing language scholars like Minnie Quartey Annan, a Ph.D. student in Georgetown’s Department of Linguistics who is doing research on African American English, is critical to taking up the challenge of bringing this generation of Black youth to man — and womanhood.

More on language:

Is there a D.C. dialect? It’s a topic locals are pretty ‘cised’ to discuss

Video: How do you pronounce ‘water’?

How do you speak D.C.? ‘Accent tags’ help to define the District’s dialect

Terms native to D.C.

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Rwanda: The Power of Literacy in the Transformation of a Nation (Page 1 of 2)

Rwanda: The Power of Literacy in the Transformation of a Nation (Page 1 of 2) | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it

"LITERACY IS not a luxury; it is a right and a responsibility. If our world is to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century we must harness the energy and creativity of all our citizens," Bill Clinton said on the International Literacy Day, 1994.

In relation to these words, this column examines the crucial role that a reading culture may play not only in promoting the generation of free and creative thinkers in societies, but also as an important tool in social-economic and political advancement of society.

The fact that literacy and reading facilitate effective communication and critical thinking needs not to be emphasised. When we talk of power of literacy, it's more than understanding the vocabulary and syntax of a written message. Critical reading entails the reader understanding the purpose of the message and appreciating the context that it was conceived in. Literacy without critical understanding of the message is nothing more than noise in our ears!

In this respect, homes and schools have the responsibility to help children/students understand that biases and perceptions of the world are fundamental to the messages that are expressed. Such biases need to be identified and examined for their impact on the individual, society and the world at large.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

"LITERACY IS not a luxury; it is a right and a responsibility. If our world is to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century we must harness the energy and creativity of all our citizens," Bill Clinton said on the International Literacy Day, 1994.

In relation to these words, this column examines the crucial role that a reading culture may play not only in promoting the generation of free and creative thinkers in societies, but also as an important tool in social-economic and political advancement of society.

The fact that literacy and reading facilitate effective communication and critical thinking needs not to be emphasised. When we talk of power of literacy, it's more than understanding the vocabulary and syntax of a written message. Critical reading entails the reader understanding the purpose of the message and appreciating the context that it was conceived in. Literacy without critical understanding of the message is nothing more than noise in our ears!

In this respect, homes and schools have the responsibility to help children/students understand that biases and perceptions of the world are fundamental to the messages that are expressed. Such biases need to be identified and examined for their impact on the individual, society and the world at large.

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Alakhbar | L’auteur du texte blasphématoire conteste sa traduction devant la Cour criminelle

Alakhbar | L’auteur du texte blasphématoire conteste sa traduction devant la Cour criminelle | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it
Le mauritanien, Mohamed Cheikh Ould M'Kheitir, auteur du texte jugé blasphématoire à l’encontre du prophète Mohamed conteste le transfère de son dossier à la cour criminelle.- FR-Alakhbar.info
Charles Tiayon's insight:

ALAKHBAR (Nouakchott)- Le mauritanien, Mohamed Cheikh Ould M'Kheitir, auteur du texte jugé blasphématoire à l’encontre du prophète Mohamed conteste la décision de transférer son dossier à la cour criminelle, a appris Alakhbar de source judiciaire. 

L’affaire M'Kheitir continue de provoquer une vague de protestations et de manifestations dans plusieurs villes du pays. Des manifestants ont, à maintes reprises, réclamée la peine de mort contre l’auteur. 

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Pastor believes in volunteering

Pastor believes in volunteering | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it
THOMASVILLE | There's a familiar African proverb that says "It takes a village to raise a child."
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Smartling CEO Jack Welde to Keynote VViN and ATC Annual Conferences

Smartling CEO Jack Welde to Keynote VViN and ATC Annual Conferences | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it

NEW YORK, Sept. 16, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Smartling today announced that CEO Jack Welde will keynote two upcoming conferences of significant importance to translation companies and language service providers (LSPs) in Europe: the VViN Anniversary Conference, scheduled for September 18 and 19 in the Netherlands, and the Association of Translation Companies (ATC) Annual Conference, which will be held September 25 and 26 in the U.K.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

NEW YORK, Sept. 16, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Smartling today announced that CEO Jack Welde will keynote two upcoming conferences of significant importance to translation companies and language service providers (LSPs) in Europe: the VViN Anniversary Conference, scheduled for September 18 and 19 in the Netherlands, and the Association of Translation Companies (ATC) Annual Conference, which will be held September 25 and 26 in the U.K.

http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnvar/20140521/90260

On September 18 and 19, VViN, which aims to generate an ongoing professionalization of the translation sector in the Netherlands, will gather more than 100 translation companies from Belgium and the Netherlands at its Anniversary Conference. Welde will provide a keynote presentation on the conference's second day titled "The Translation Market Potential: How Technology Is Driving New Behaviors, Creating New Customers and Expanding the Overall Market." In this session, Welde will discuss the creation of new customers, the development of new behaviors for translation stakeholders and the true potential of the translation market.

The following week, Welde will keynote the ATC Annual Conference, which is scheduled for September 25 and 26 in Brighton, U.K. ATC is the world's longest-established professional body looking after the interests of translation companies. In his presentation, "Cleared for Takeoff: What the U.S. Air Force Taught Me About Being an Entrepreneur," Welde will share business lessons learned during his tenure in the U.S. Air Force.

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Crowdsourcing Subtitles for Endangered Languages

Crowdsourcing Subtitles for Endangered Languages | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it
Viki, the crowdsourced subtitling website, teams with the Living Tongues Institute to give endangered languages new life and attractiveness for new generations.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

[This text is from an official press release by Viki and the Living Tongues Institute.]

Video Streaming Site Viki Partners With Living Tongues,
Helps Save Endangered Languages Through Subtitles and Global TV

SAN FRANCISCO (Sept. 16, 2014)–Recent reports suggest that less than 5 percent of the world’s languages are online–and that for the other 95%, the Internet can be a path to extinction or revitalization. Viki, a popular video streaming site with primetime TV shows and movies from around the world, is hoping to reverse that trend with the help of its 33 million viewers. Viewers on Viki, a play on the words video and wiki, also happen to write or “crowdsource” the subtitles for the shows they watch.

Today, the company announced that it is launching an Endangered and Emerging Languages Program in partnership with Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages. Viki, a subsidiary of Rakuten, and Living Tongues will work to document endangered languages and assist communities with maintaining and revitalizing knowledge of their native tongues, like Quechua in Peru, Basque on the French-Spain border, or Cornish in the United Kingdom.

“Technology alone does not doom or save languages. But pride in a language, and willingness to creatively expand its use through technologies like Viki, can certainly help save it,” said Dr. K. David Harrison, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Linguistics at Swarthmore College and Director of Research for the Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages.

Linguists, scholars, technologists, students, and other members of the Viki community are already using the Viki platform to help make shows available in languages on the brink of extinction. To date, shows on Viki–including Korean dramas, Japanese anime, Bollywood and US films–have been subtitled into 29 endangered and threatened and 20 emerging languages, accounting for nearly 25 percent of the 200 languages available on the site.

“In the past two years, we’ve been contacted by nearly a dozen organizations whose mission is to preserve their languages, and by extension, their rich cultural histories. They wanted us to add their language to our subtitles list so that they could help the younger generation practice and learn,” said Razmig Hovaghimian, Viki CEO and co-founder. “We want to help ensure that these languages are not forgotten or lost, but live on in a tradition that has carried them for generations–through storytelling.”


[CLICK IMAGE TO ENLARGE] As many as half of the world’s known 7,120 languages are in some state of decline. On a continuum of vitality, called the EGIDS scale, languages may be ranked from completely safe and used on a national scale, like Nepali, to extinct and having no native speakers, but undergoing revitalization, like Cornish. (Map courtesy of Viki and the Living Tongues Institute)To learn more about Viki ‘s Endangered and Emerging Languages Program in partnership with Living Tongues, how to get involved, and how to help provide access to global TV no matter what language you speak, visit www.viki.com/endangeredlanguages.


About Viki
Viki is a global TV site with TV shows, movies and other premium content, translated into more than 200 languages by a community of avid fans. With 33 million viewers each month and over 650 million words translated, Viki uniquely brings global prime-time entertainment to new audiences and unlocks new markets and revenue opportunities for content owners. Viki was named a World Economic Forum Technology Pioneer 2014 and acquired by Japanese internet services giant Rakuten in September 2013. The company has offices in San Francisco, Singapore, Seoul and Tokyo.

About Living Tongues
The Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization dedicated solely to the documentation, maintenance, and revitalization of endangered languages globally. It develops and manages linguist-aided, community-led projects that promote the use of digital video, computers, and other modern information technology. Staff members of Living Tongues Institute have successfully completed funded projects in India, Siberia, Native North America, Nigeria, Kyrgyzstan, the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Mongolia and India.

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Antonio Bueno recoge en Bruselas la distinción europea del Master de Traducción de Soria

La Dirección General de Traducción de la Comisión Europea ha revalidado la distinción europea del Master de Traducción Profesional e Institucional, impartido en la Facultad de Traducción e interpretación del Campus Duques de Soria, y que ya venía disfrutando desde 2011. El diploma que acredita esta distinción lo recoge el decano del centro, Antonio Bueno en Bruselas en la sede de la Comisión Europea, en el marco de la reunión de la Red del Máster Europeo (EMT).
Charles Tiayon's insight:

La Dirección General de Traducción de la Comisión Europea ha revalidado la distinción europea del Master de Traducción Profesional e Institucional, impartido en la Facultad de Traducción e interpretación del Campus Duques de Soria, y que ya venía disfrutando desde 2011. El diploma que acredita esta distinción lo recoge el decano del centro, Antonio Bueno en Bruselas en la sede de la Comisión Europea, en el marco de la reunión de la Red del Máster Europeo (EMT).


LO MÁS


El distintivo lo mantendrá hasta el año 2018, cuando podrá someterse a nueva evaluación y los expertos han destacado como puntos fuertes del programa su estructura pedagógica profesionalizante, con profesores de gran experiencia en las competencias enseñadas y gran conocimiento del mercado y de sus exigencias, así como su programa de prácticas en numerosas empresas e instituciones que permiten la validación de las competencias adquiridas.

Esta distinción le permite ser miembro de la Red del Master Europeo (EMT), con pleno derecho para usar la etiqueta, asistir con un voto a las deliberaciones de la Red y participar en los debates celebrados en los foros de Bruselas.

Los expertos han evaluado un total de 114 candidaturas, 108 provenientes de los 26 Estados miembros de la Unión Europea y seis de otros países.

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Woody Allen da visto bueno a México para montar su trilogía de obras

Woody Allen da visto bueno a México para montar su trilogía de obras | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it
La calidad con la que se produce el teatro en México motivó al cineasta estadunidense Woody Allen para aceptar que su trilogía de obras se monte en este país por primera vez a nivel profesional
Charles Tiayon's insight:
La calidad con la que se produce el teatro en México motivó al cineasta estadunidense Woody Allen para aceptar que su trilogía de obras se monte en este país por primera vez a nivel profesional
 
Notimex - Así lo confirmó Daniel Gómez Casanova, quien adquirió los derechos para montar en esta ciudad las piezas: "Riverside drive", "Old Saybrook" y "Central Park West", queWoody Allen dio a conocer en 2003 y que hasta el momento sólo se han presentado a nivel universitario.

Este 19 de septiembre, en el teatro San Jerónimo, iniciará la temporada de "A la orilla del río" (Riverside drive) con las actuaciones de Kuno BeckerErick Elías Marimar Vega. El próximo año, el productor buscará llevar a escena las otras dos historias.

"Para Woody Allen es importante que sus obras se monten en México, pues sabe de la calidad con la que se trabaja aquí. Por ello es que autorizó que por primera vez se hagan a nivel profesional, pues otras veces ha sido sólo a nivel escolar, en lo universitario", éxplicó Gómez Casanova.

Admitió que conseguir los derechos fue complicado, sobre todo por el tema de la traducción.

"El abogado de Woody Allen me llamó para preguntarme si quería sólo una obra o la trilogía. Cuando le dije que me interesaba representarlas todas me cambió el contrato y me pidió que mandara la traducción. Me la regresaron varias veces hasta que finalmente me dieron cita con Woody", recordó.

La reunión ocurrió un lunes en Nueva York, en el bar de un hotel donde Woody Allen toca el clarinete ante menos de 100 personas.

"Supe que ahí toca durante nueve meses del año, todos los lunes. Me citaron una hora antes de su ´show´ y me quedé a verlo. Platicamos un buen rato, me pareció un hombre muy inteligente, tímido, amable y en general, un tipo muy buena onda", compartió el productor.

Al director de cine, actor y músico le agradó la traducción de sus historias. Incluso, expresó su deseo por disfrutar la puesta.

"Lo invité, pero no sabemos si pueda venir al estreno, o quizá lo haga para las primeras 100 funciones, ya veremos", dijo.

"A la orilla del río" narra el caso de un escritor, quien cita a su amante para hablar con ella. Mientras el encuentro ocurre, un vagabundo platica con él echándole en cara muchos de sus errores.

"Es una obra súper divertida, una gran comedia de enredos pero expuesta de una
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Full steam ahead for FBI’s biometric NGI system | Planet Biometrics News

Full steam ahead for FBI’s biometric NGI system | Planet Biometrics News | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) Division has announced full operational capability of its Next Generation Identification (NGI) System. The FBI’s NGI System was developed to expand the Bureau’s biometric identification capabilities, ultimately replacing its Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS) in addition to adding new services and capabilities.

As part of NGI’s full operational capability, the NGI team says it is introducing two new services: Rap Back and the Interstate Photo System (IPS). Rap Back enables authorized entities to receive ongoing status notifications of any criminal history reported on individuals holding positions of trust, such as school teachers. Law enforcement agencies, probation and parole offices, and other criminal justice entities will also greatly improve their effectiveness by being advised of subsequent criminal activity of persons under investigation or supervision.

The IPS facial recognition service will provide the USA’s law enforcement community with an investigative tool that provides an image-searching capability of photographs associated with criminal identities. This effort is a significant step forward for the criminal justice community in utilizing biometrics as an investigative enabler.

This latest phase of NGI is only one portion of the FBI’s NGI System. Since phase one was deployed in February 2011, the NGI system has introduced enhanced automated fingerprint and latent search capabilities, mobile fingerprint identification, and electronic image storage, all while adding enhanced processing speed and automation for electronic exchange of fingerprints to more than 18,000 law enforcement agencies and other authorized criminal justice partners 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Earlier this year more than 30 privacy organizations teamed up to demand that the FBI conducted and published a privacy impact assessment (PIA) for its Next Generation Identification (NGI) database.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) said the capacity of the FBI to collect and retain information has grown exponentially. It is essential, EFF says, "for the American public to have a complete picture of all the programs and authorities the FBI uses to track our daily lives and an understanding of how those programs affect our civil rights and civil liberties."

FBI officials said it was wrong to think the FBI collected images in any general kind of way. "These are only lawfully collected mugshot images during the incident to arrest," one senior official said.

The database of mugshots in March reportedly stood at 17 million individuals in the repository. However, the overall FBI criminal master file has more than 70 million people in it, and most of these have mugshots attached to them. The FBI official said pilots were underway to include these mugshots so that "very quickly there will be a much larger repository available to search".

Further search opportunities exist - but only for direct FBI case work, it emerged. FBI attorneys and privacy officials have reportedly negotiated with various state and local DMVs, as well as the Department of State and others, to allow additional database searches, meaning that the FBI has access to roughly 270 million individuals images. However, these are only searchable against in connection with a properly predicated investigation, the FBI official stressed.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) Division has announced full operational capability of its Next Generation Identification (NGI) System. The FBI’s NGI System was developed to expand the Bureau’s biometric identification capabilities, ultimately replacing its Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS) in addition to adding new services and capabilities.

As part of NGI’s full operational capability, the NGI team says it is introducing two new services: Rap Back and the Interstate Photo System (IPS). Rap Back enables authorized entities to receive ongoing status notifications of any criminal history reported on individuals holding positions of trust, such as school teachers. Law enforcement agencies, probation and parole offices, and other criminal justice entities will also greatly improve their effectiveness by being advised of subsequent criminal activity of persons under investigation or supervision.

The IPS facial recognition service will provide the USA’s law enforcement community with an investigative tool that provides an image-searching capability of photographs associated with criminal identities. This effort is a significant step forward for the criminal justice community in utilizing biometrics as an investigative enabler.

This latest phase of NGI is only one portion of the FBI’s NGI System. Since phase one was deployed in February 2011, the NGI system has introduced enhanced automated fingerprint and latent search capabilities, mobile fingerprint identification, and electronic image storage, all while adding enhanced processing speed and automation for electronic exchange of fingerprints to more than 18,000 law enforcement agencies and other authorized criminal justice partners 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Earlier this year more than 30 privacy organizations teamed up to demand that the FBI conducted and published a privacy impact assessment (PIA) for its Next Generation Identification (NGI) database.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) said the capacity of the FBI to collect and retain information has grown exponentially. It is essential, EFF says, "for the American public to have a complete picture of all the programs and authorities the FBI uses to track our daily lives and an understanding of how those programs affect our civil rights and civil liberties."

FBI officials said it was wrong to think the FBI collected images in any general kind of way. "These are only lawfully collected mugshot images during the incident to arrest," one senior official said.

The database of mugshots in March reportedly stood at 17 million individuals in the repository. However, the overall FBI criminal master file has more than 70 million people in it, and most of these have mugshots attached to them. The FBI official said pilots were underway to include these mugshots so that "very quickly there will be a much larger repository available to search".

Further search opportunities exist - but only for direct FBI case work, it emerged. FBI attorneys and privacy officials have reportedly negotiated with various state and local DMVs, as well as the Department of State and others, to allow additional database searches, meaning that the FBI has access to roughly 270 million individuals images. However, these are only searchable against in connection with a properly predicated investigation, the FBI official stressed.

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Smartling to Present a Three-Part Series on Translation at INBOUND 2014

Smartling to Present a Three-Part Series on Translation at INBOUND 2014 | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it
NEW YORK, Sept. 15, 2014 /PRNewswire/ --??Smartling today announced that VP of Marketing Nataly Kelly will speak at INBOUND 2014, which will take place
Charles Tiayon's insight:

NEW YORKSept. 15, 2014 /PRNewswire/ --Smartling today announced that VP of Marketing Nataly Kelly will speak at INBOUND 2014, which will take place September 15-18 in Boston. INBOUND, which gathers thousands of marketing and sales professionals from around the world, provides attendees with the inspiration, education and connections necessary to transform their business.


Kelly will present a three-part series highlighting "must-know" facts about translation quality, efficiency and technology. Attendees will learn best practices for expanding their company's global reach by providing consumers with a native language experience that truly reflects the way they live, act and speak.


  • Who: Nataly Kelly, VP of marketing at Smartling

  • What: Kelly will present a three-part series providing critical information on translation quality, efficiency and technology

  • When: Part one, "10 Things to Know about Translation Quality," will be held from 6-6:30 p.m. ET onTuesday, September 16; Part two, "10 Things to Know about Translation Efficiency," is scheduled forWednesday, September 17, from 2:30-3 p.m. ET; Part three, "10 Things to Know about Translation Technology," will take place from 10-10:30 a.m. ET on Thursday, September 18

  • Where: Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

To learn more about Smartling, stop by booth No. 7 at the show, or go to: www.smartling.com. For more information on INBOUND 2014, please visit: http://www.inbound.com/.


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International Literacy Day 2014 - “Literacy and Sustainable Development”

International Literacy Day 2014  - “Literacy and Sustainable Development” | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it
Literacy and Sustainable Development

The theme of International Literacy Day 2014 is “Literacy and Sustainable Development”.  Literacy is one of the key elements needed to promote sustainable development, as it empowers people so that they can make the right decisions in the areas of economic growth, social development and environmental integration. Literacy is a basis for lifelong learning and plays a crucial foundational role in the creation of sustainable, prosperous and peaceful societies. 

Literacy skills developed from a basic to advanced level throughout life are part of broader competencies required for critical thinking, the sense of responsibility, participatory governance, sustainable consumption and lifestyles, ecological behaviours, biodiversity protection, poverty reduction, and disaster risk reduction.  

This year’s International Literacy Day will be celebrated worldwide. A main global celebration will take place in Dhaka, where the Government of Bangladesh in cooperation with UNESCO will organize the International Conference on “Girls’ and women’s literacy and education: Foundations for sustainable development and the awarding of UNESCO Literacy Prizes” in support for the UN Secretary General’s Global Education First Initiative (GEFI).

  Literacy is a key lever of change and a practical tool of empowerment on each of the three main pillars of sustainable development: economic development, social development and environmental protection.    

Former UN Secretary-General, Kofi Annan



POSTER 2014

- See more at: http://www.unesco.org/new/en/unesco/events/prizes-and-celebrations/celebrations/international-days/literacy-day/#sthash.LHVpc3LF.dpuf

Charles Tiayon's insight:
Literacy and Sustainable Development

The theme of International Literacy Day 2014 is “Literacy and Sustainable Development”.  Literacy is one of the key elements needed to promote sustainable development, as it empowers people so that they can make the right decisions in the areas of economic growth, social development and environmental integration. Literacy is a basis for lifelong learning and plays a crucial foundational role in the creation of sustainable, prosperous and peaceful societies. 

Literacy skills developed from a basic to advanced level throughout life are part of broader competencies required for critical thinking, the sense of responsibility, participatory governance, sustainable consumption and lifestyles, ecological behaviours, biodiversity protection, poverty reduction, and disaster risk reduction.  

This year’s International Literacy Day will be celebrated worldwide. A main global celebration will take place in Dhaka, where the Government of Bangladesh in cooperation with UNESCO will organize the International Conference on “Girls’ and women’s literacy and education: Foundations for sustainable development and the awarding of UNESCO Literacy Prizes” in support for the UN Secretary General’s Global Education First Initiative (GEFI).

  Literacy is a key lever of change and a practical tool of empowerment on each of the three main pillars of sustainable development: economic development, social development and environmental protection.    

Former UN Secretary-General, Kofi Annan



POSTER 2014

- See more at: http://www.unesco.org/new/en/unesco/events/prizes-and-celebrations/celebrations/international-days/literacy-day/#sthash.LHVpc3LF.dpuf

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Radical matric reform on the cards - Times LIVE

Radical matric reform on the cards - Times LIVE | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it

The ministerial matric exam task team said the standard of the African languages home language papers had repeatedly given rise to questions over the past five years. The issue had been controversial, not only in public, but also in interactions between examination authorities and the Department of Basic Education.

"One key issue that has arisen as a criticism of the NSC is that the mean scores are very high in the African languages compared with Afrikaans and English and all other subjects in the matric exam.

...


"For instance, in Afrikaans, of the learners that achieved less than 39% for Afrikaans home language, 80% failed the total exam. Of those who achieved 60%-69% only 1.3% failed; at 70%-79% only 0.3% failed and 80%-100%, only 0.1% failed the total exam.

Charles Tiayon's insight:

The ministerial matric exam task team said the standard of the African languages home language papers had repeatedly given rise to questions over the past five years. The issue had been controversial, not only in public, but also in interactions between examination authorities and the Department of Basic Education.

"One key issue that has arisen as a criticism of the NSC is that the mean scores are very high in the African languages compared with Afrikaans and English and all other subjects in the matric exam.

...


"For instance, in Afrikaans, of the learners that achieved less than 39% for Afrikaans home language, 80% failed the total exam. Of those who achieved 60%-69% only 1.3% failed; at 70%-79% only 0.3% failed and 80%-100%, only 0.1% failed the total exam.

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LA GRANDE AVENTURE DU FRANÇAIS:Comment le dialecte des rois est devenu le français

LA GRANDE AVENTURE DU FRANÇAIS:Comment le dialecte des rois est devenu le français | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it
L'ancien dialecte des rois de France aurait pu devenir notre langue commune. Il a été imposé comme langue unique. Au nom de valeurs "universelles" parfois contestables...
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Le Français le plus célèbre du monde n'est pas connu sous son vrai nom. Napoléon est en effet né Napoleone di Buonaparte. Mais voilà : en France, on "parisianise" les noms de famille. C'est ainsi : dans notre beau pays, les rapports entre la langue et l'Etat sont particuliers.Il est vrai que, dans la lente apparition de notre Etat-nation, la langue a toujours constitué un enjeu majeur. Pour une raison simple à comprendre : chez nous, l'unité politique a précédé l'unité linguistique, ce qui n'est pas le cas de l'Allemagne ou de l'Italie.  

Pour ne rien arranger, l'idéologie s'en est mêlée. Les révolutionnaires se sont persuadés que la pensée nouvelle ne pouvait s'exprimer qu'en français. Dans le même mouvement, ils ont associé l'Ancien Régime aux langues régionales, "des idiomes grossiers qui ne peuvent servir que le fanatisme et les contre-révolutionnaires", selon l'expression du conventionnel Bertrand Barère. Ils ne se sont pas contentés, comme la monarchie, d'instaurer le français comme langue de l'administration. Ils ont considéré qu'il fallait l'imposer au peuple. 

L'abbé Grégoire publie ainsi, le 16 prairial an II, son célèbre rapport sur "la nécessité et les moyens d'anéantir les patois" - "anéantir"! -, où il note avec effarement que le français n'est parlé que dans une quinzaine de départements (sur 83). Le terme "patois" est conforme aux préjugés des élites de l'époque, fussent-elles les plus éclairées.  


L'école telle qu'instituée par Jules Ferry, en 1881.

© Jacques Pavlovsky/Sygma/Corbis


Dans son Encyclopédie, d'Alembert choisit ainsi cette définition : "Patois : langage corrompu tel qu'il se parle dans presque toutes les provinces. On ne parle la langue que dans la capitale." Des a priori qui perdurent aujourd'hui. Qui étudie Frédéric Mistral, prix Nobel de littérature en 1904 pour une oeuvre écrite en provençal ? Qui connaît le poète languedocien Pierre Goudelin (Pèire Godolin, de son vrai nom), considéré au XVIIe siècle comme l'égal d'Homère et de Ronsard? 

"La Révolution a donné la parole à la bourgeoisie"

Ceci excuse-t-il cela ? La Révolution mène cette politique culturellement criminelle au nom de sentiments nobles. On prétend "élever" le peuple en lui donnant accès à la "meilleure" langue. On entend réduire la fracture entre les masses et la classe supérieure, qui accède aux places et au savoir grâce à sa maîtrise du français. 

Quelques esprits marginaux proposent pourtant d'atteindre l'égalité par une autre voie : le français comme langue commune, et non comme langue unique. Ce plurilinguisme sera rejeté au nom de l'unité, confondue avec l'uniformisation. D'où ce paradoxe, souligné par le lexicographe Alain Rey : "La Révolution prétendait donner la parole au peuple. Linguistiquement, elle l'a donnée à la bourgeoisie." 

La Révolution sera cependant trop brève pour permettre de traduire les idées de l'abbé Grégoire dans la réalité. Qu'à cela ne tienne : les régimes suivants s'en chargeront. L'Empire d'abord (dans les lycées, créés par Napoléon, le français est seule langue d'éducation). La Restauration, ensuite ("il faut absolument détruire le langage breton", écrit en 1831 le ministre de l'Instruction publique à ses préfets). La République, enfin. 

Le spectre de la Belgique, minée par sa querelle entre Flamands et Wallons

C'est la IIIe du nom qui, dans ce domaine, se révélera la plus efficace. Là encore, Jules Ferry et ses contemporains agissent avec des sentiments élevés. Tout comme la colonisation prétend "civiliser les races inférieures", l'école publique est censée élever tous les Français au rang de citoyens. Et, en bonne logique républicaine, cet objectif ne saurait être atteint que par le français, seul porteur de valeurs universelles, tandis que les parlers régionaux sont supposés enfermer leurs locuteurs dans un dangereux communautarisme.  

Un raisonnement spécieux, relevé notamment par l'historienne Mona Ozouf (Composition française, Gallimard). "L'école, au nom de l'universel, humiliait la particularité. Mais l'école ne professait-elle pas en réalité sans le dire une particularité aussi, la française, qu'elle dissimulait sous le manteau de l'universel?" 

Il n'empêche : cette interprétation domine toujours aujourd'hui. Ainsi, en 1992, seul le français entre dans la Constitution. Ce nouvel alinéa de l'article 2, introduit notamment pour protéger notre langue contre l'anglais au moment de la mise en place du grand marché européen, va se retourner contre... les langues régionales. En 1999, le Conseil constitutionnel l'invoque en effet pour interdire la ratification de la charte européenne les concernant. Celles-ci finiront bien par faire leur apparition dans la loi fondamentale, en 2008, mais simplement au titre de "patrimoine de la France". Un article qui ne leur apportera rien de concret. 

Depuis une cinquantaine d'années, pourtant, les gouvernements ont changé de discours et même de pratique à leur égard. Ici ou là, on peut les apprendre à l'école. Très symboliquement, la délégation générale à la langue française s'occupe aussi "des langues de France". Mais aucun ministre n'a osé prendre les seules mesures qui modifieraient radicalement leur situation : leur utilisation massive dans l'enseignement, les entreprises et les administrations. Pendant des siècles, l'Etat français a planifié leur disparition. Aujourd'hui, il les laisse simplement mourir... 

Pour se justifier, les tenants du jacobinisme culturel évoquent le spectre de la Belgique, "minée" par sa querelle entre Flamands et Wallons, et de l'Espagne, "menacée" par les identités basque et catalane. L'argument est sérieux. Mais, curieusement, les mêmes oublient volontiers la Suisse qui, comme des dizaines de pays, vit paisiblement avec plusieurs langues officielles. Quand ils ne se contredisent pas en exigeant, pour les francophones du Québec, des mesures que Paris refuse sur son sol pour ses propres langues minoritaires. 

Oui, décidément, dans notre beau pays, les rapports entre la langue et l'Etat sont particuliers... 

À principes nouveaux, vocabulaire nouveau


La place de la Concorde, ex-place de la Révolution.

AFP PHOTO / JOEL SAGET


En politique, les mots sont des armes. Les révolutionnaires de 1789 l'ont bien compris. Malgré les guerres extérieures, malgré les révoltes sociales, malgré les soubresauts incessants, la maîtrise de la langue reste à leurs yeux une priorité. Et tous les domaines sont concernés : les noms des villes (Fontenay-le-Comte devient Fontenay-le-Peuple) ; ceux des espaces publics (la place Louis-XV, future place de la Concorde, devient place de la Révolution) ; le calendrier (vendémiaire, pluviôse,floréal, fructidor...) ; "citoyen" et "citoyenne" remplacent "monsieur" et "madame". Le tutoiement est institué. Les poids et mesures sont unifiés, avec l'adoption du système métrique. Tout cela est pensé : en se rendant maître du vocabulaire, il s'agit de rompre avec les valeurs de l'Ancien Régime et de conquérir les esprits. De la "race des seigneurs" exaltée par Hitler aux "ennemis du peuple" dénoncés par Lénine, bien des régimes reprendront ce procédé d


En savoir plus sur http://www.lexpress.fr/culture/comment-le-dialecte-des-rois-est-devenu-le-francais_1562979.html#XpTUOlCKt3wzcG7f.99

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Should more Aussies be bilingual?

Should more Aussies be bilingual? | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it
(Transcript from World News Radio) According to figures from the 2011 Census, the number of Australians who speak only English is gradually falling. At the same time, those who say they speak two languages 'very well' is gradually on the rise. But proponents of bilingualism argue that too much emphasis is still being placed on English proficiency in multicultural Australia. They say while some competence in English is important, it shouldn't be at the expense of other languages. Van Nguyen has the details.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

(Transcript from World News Radio)

According to figures from the 2011 Census, the number of Australians who speak only English is gradually falling.

At the same time, those who say they speak two languages 'very well' is gradually on the rise.

But proponents of bilingualism argue that too much emphasis is still being placed on English proficiency in multicultural Australia.

They say while some competence in English is important, it shouldn't be at the expense of other languages.

Van Nguyen has the details.

(Click on audio tab to listen to this item)

"(Dinka) Speaking in different languages is very important, because it allows us to understand the dynamics of things and the different information. (Polish) In Australia, it's very necessary to speak English but it you can't speak English, there are a lot of services can help you to survive. (Cantonese) Bilingualism in Australia is very important. Being able to speak another language is helpful in preserving one's culture, enhancing communication and when doing business."

Deputy chair of the Ethnic Communities' Council of Victoria, Marion Lau, is among those pointing to the advantages of having at least a second language when wanting to do business with the rest of the world.

She believes Australia is characterised by monolingual thinking, from the government level, down.

"Most of the decision-makers and policy-makers are people who are from a monolingual background."

"Most of the decision-makers and policy-makers are people who are from a monolingual background. I think given that the world is becoming so globalised, we need to take advantage of all opportunities to be communicating with people from different parts of the world."

Victoria-Gras is a researcher at the Department of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics at Monash University in Melbourne.

She agrees that despite the country becoming increasingly multi-cultural, Australia isn't supportive enough of languages other than English.

"We hear it a lot - that we're multicultural and multilingual but I think that there is still a widely-spread monolingual mindset in that, languages that are different to English are seen as transitional in a way. That it is something that the others speak, that ethnic groups speak or maybe that newcomers speak, that they become more Australian in a way. They'll just forget about in a way and that's a bit of a problem for both sides. It's a problem for the actual immigrants who come here, which is what the country has been built with, because they have that, they sense this message that they actually have to forget about their language. But it's also a problem for the monolingual Australian who wants to learn a language because it's seen as something that it's very difficult to achieve."

Professor of Language and Literacy Education at the University of Melbourne, Joe Lo Bianco, also believes Australian society puts too much importance on proficiency in English.

He says English-language speakers are seen as dominant and successful, making maintenance of other languages less of a priority.

"The problem is that knowledge of English is ranked higher than knowledge of any other languages and that immigrant children and new arrivals in general make a big effort to learn English and in the process of that, sometimes, neglect the maintenance of their other language. And because English is a very important world language, many Australians don't quite make enough effort to learn other languages so the overall effect of these tendencies is to rank English much higher than other languages in social power and that tends to make language maintenance weaker."

Victoria-Gras says with many migrants and refugees arriving from non-English speaking countries, Australia has good opportunities to develop bilingualism.

"There is a huge potential for Australia to have lots and lots of bilinguals, if you think of all the people who come to this country speaking another language to start with."

"There is a huge potential for Australia to have lots and lots of bilinguals, if you think of all the people who come to this country speaking another language to start with. So if we supported those families to maintain their language at home, we would have a vast potential of Australians who would be bilingual to start with. And then of course, there's the other side, which is Australians who are monolingual at home who could have more opportunities to learn the language if we actually took advantage of all that potential force of bilinguals."

Marion Lau says it's quite understandable that new settlers in Australia have a strong urge to learn English.

She says despite an increase in the amount of material available in languages other than English, it's still not easy to find out about the full range of government services and programs available.

And she says a lack of English skills can have repercussions when seeking medical treatment, or when trying to find a job.

"They have great difficulty because they do not have the opportunity or ability to understand what's happening, leading to maybe, getting themselves into a lot of problems and troubles either with the law or if it's a health issue, leading to a misdiagnosis because of the lack of communication, lack of language skills. And the opportunity to find a job or find employment also would be reduced dramatically because they don't understand what's going on. They cannot communicate and convey to their potential employer what their capacity and capability are at doing a job of work. Or even if they are qualified from overseas and they come here, but do not speak the language, employers are not prepared to take them on."

Professor Lo Bianco says learning English shouldn't be compulsory for new migrants.

But he says those with no English can become dependent on others.

"A person like that can live a full life. There's no moral problem with not knowing English and no one should ever argue that. But there is a lot of information in our society that's only available in English and there are many social networks and opportunities that are closed off to you, if you don't know English. You are completely dependent on other people for access to information and networks that are only in English. So if it's fine for you to be dependent, then that's ok, I'm not saying there's anything wrong with it. But it does limit people to relying on other people to do things for them."

The federal government provides 510 hours of free English language classes to newly-arrived migrants and refugees through Adult Multicultural Educational Services.

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L'essentiel Online - On parle trois langues et «il n y a pas de souci» - Luxembourg

L'essentiel Online - On parle trois langues et «il n y a pas de souci» - Luxembourg | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it
LUXEMBOURG - La résurgence d une certaine xénophobie et d un racisme antifrançais sur les réseaux sociaux inquiètent le musée de la Résistance qui prône la tolérance, via un autocollant.
Charles Tiayon's insight:

Le musée national de la Résistance «ne s'implique pas seulement pour la mémoire des résistants mais de manière générale pour les valeurs pour lesquelles ils se sont battus», peut-on lire dans un communiqué publié ce mardi. Alors pour preuve de son engagement, le musée a créé un autocollant (voir ci-dessus) que vous avez certainement vu passer sur Facebook, ces derniers jours.

Cet autocollant est disponible gratuitement au musée national de la Résistance. Il est aussi possible d'en commander en téléphonant au 54 84 72 ou en laissant un message sur la page Facebook du musée.

Cet autocollant se veut comme un pied de nez à une certaine résurgence de la xénophobie sur les réseaux sociaux. Le musée évoque ainsi le groupe «Fir all dei et satt hun gesot ze kreien "scheiss letzeboier"» et s'inquiète de la montée d'«un racisme antifrancophone». Selon le musée, le multiculturalisme et le multilinguisme du Luxembourg «sont une chance» et le pays «a besoin des étrangers». Le musée va même plus loin. Pour lui, «c'est un fait qu'il n'y a jamais eu autant de gens qui ont appris notre langue».

Le message du musée se veut clair. Peu importe le pays d'origine ou la langue parlée: «Il n'y a pas de souci» (ou comme écrit sur l'autocollant «alles kee problem»).

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ComputEL: The use of computational methods in the study of endangered languages

ComputEL: The use of computational methods in the study of endangered languages | The World of Indigenous Languages | Scoop.it

ComputEL 
The use of computational methods in the study of endangered languages 
52nd Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics 
26 June 2014 

<p "="">Workshop description

Contemporary efforts to document the world’s endangered languages—often going under the rubric of documentary linguistics—are dependent on the widespread availability of modern recording technologies, in particular digital audio and video recording devices and software to annotate the recordings that such devices produce. However, despite well over a decade of dedicated funding efforts aimed at the documentation of endangered languages, the technological landscape that supports the work of those involved in this work remains fragmented, and the promises of new technology remain largely unfulfilled. Moreover, the efforts of computer scientists, on the whole, are mostly disconnected from the day-to-day work of documentary linguists, making it difficult for the knowledge of each group to inform the other. On the one hand, this deprives documentary linguists of tools making use of the latest research results to speed up the time-consuming task of describing an underdocumented language. On the other hand, it severely limits the ability of computational linguists to test their methods on the full range of world’s linguistic diversity.

This workshop seeks to address this state of affairs by bringing together papers exploring the use of computational methods to facilitate the documentation and study of endangered languages. Possible topics may include, but are not limited to: (i) examining the use of specific computational methods in the analysis of data from low-resource languages, with a focus on endangered languages, (ii) proposing new models for the collection and management of data in endangered language settings, and (iii) considering what concrete steps are required to allow for a more fruitful interaction between computer scientists and documentary linguists. The workshop’s intention is not merely to allow for the presentation of research on these topics but also to help build a community of computational and documentary linguists who are able to effectively pair together to serve their common interests.


<p "="">Submission information

Both long and short papers following ACL guidelines are eligible for submission. Long paper submissions should follow the two-column format of ACL 2014 proceedings without exceeding eight (8) pages of content plus two extra pages for references. Short paper submissions should also follow the two-column format of ACL 2014 proceedings, and should not exceed four (4) pages plus at most 2 pages for references. We strongly recommend the use of ACL LaTeX style files or Microsoft Word style files tailored for this year’s conference. Submissions must conform to the official style guidelines, which are contained in the style files, and they must be in PDF. Submission should be done via the START Conference Manager at https://www.softconf.com/acl2014/ComputEL.


<p "="">Funding possibilites

This workshop is being supported by U.S. National Science Foundation Award no. 1404352. Through this award, and related sources, funding may be available for those with accepted papers to attend the workshop, especially students. Please contact Jeff Good (jcgood@buffalo.edu) for further information.


<p "="">Important Dates

18 November 2013: First Call for Workshop Papers

9 February 2014: Second Call for Workshop Papers

14 March 2014: Workshop Paper Due Date 

11 April 2014: Notification of Acceptance

28 April 2014: Camera-ready papers due

26 or 27 June 2014: Workshop Dates


<p "="">Organizing committee

Jeff Good, University at Buffalo (jcgood@buffalo.edu)

Julia Hirschberg, Columbia University

Owen Rambow, Columbia University


<p "="">Program Committee

Steven Abney, University of Michigan

Helen Aristar-Dry, LINGUIST List

Alexandre Arkhipov, Moscow State University

Tim Baldwin, University of Melbourne

Dorothee Beermann, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Emily M. Bender, University of Washington

Andrea Berez, University of Hawaii

Steven Bird, University of Melbourne

Damir Cavar, Eastern Michigan University

Guy De Pauw, University of Antwerp

Sebastian Drude, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Harald Hammarström, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Judith Klavans, University of Maryland

Terry Langendoen, University of Arizona

Lori Levin, Carnegie Mellon University

Will Lewis, Microsoft

Mark Liberman, University of Pennsylvania

Worthy Martin, University of Virginia

Mike Maxwell, Center for the Advanced Study of Language

Steven Moran, University of Zurich

Alexander Nakhimovsky, Colgate University

Sebastian Nordhoff, Max Plank Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Alexis Palmer, Saarland University

Kevin Scannell, Saint Louis University

Gary Simons, SIL International

Nick Thieberger, University of Melbourne

Paul Trilsbeek, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Doug Whalen, CUNY Graduate Center

Menzo Windhouwer, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Fei Xia, University of Washington

Charles Tiayon's insight:

ComputEL 
The use of computational methods in the study of endangered languages 
52nd Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics 
26 June 2014 

<p "="">Workshop description

Contemporary efforts to document the world’s endangered languages—often going under the rubric of documentary linguistics—are dependent on the widespread availability of modern recording technologies, in particular digital audio and video recording devices and software to annotate the recordings that such devices produce. However, despite well over a decade of dedicated funding efforts aimed at the documentation of endangered languages, the technological landscape that supports the work of those involved in this work remains fragmented, and the promises of new technology remain largely unfulfilled. Moreover, the efforts of computer scientists, on the whole, are mostly disconnected from the day-to-day work of documentary linguists, making it difficult for the knowledge of each group to inform the other. On the one hand, this deprives documentary linguists of tools making use of the latest research results to speed up the time-consuming task of describing an underdocumented language. On the other hand, it severely limits the ability of computational linguists to test their methods on the full range of world’s linguistic diversity.

This workshop seeks to address this state of affairs by bringing together papers exploring the use of computational methods to facilitate the documentation and study of endangered languages. Possible topics may include, but are not limited to: (i) examining the use of specific computational methods in the analysis of data from low-resource languages, with a focus on endangered languages, (ii) proposing new models for the collection and management of data in endangered language settings, and (iii) considering what concrete steps are required to allow for a more fruitful interaction between computer scientists and documentary linguists. The workshop’s intention is not merely to allow for the presentation of research on these topics but also to help build a community of computational and documentary linguists who are able to effectively pair together to serve their common interests.


<p "="">Submission information

Both long and short papers following ACL guidelines are eligible for submission. Long paper submissions should follow the two-column format of ACL 2014 proceedings without exceeding eight (8) pages of content plus two extra pages for references. Short paper submissions should also follow the two-column format of ACL 2014 proceedings, and should not exceed four (4) pages plus at most 2 pages for references. We strongly recommend the use of ACL LaTeX style files or Microsoft Word style files tailored for this year’s conference. Submissions must conform to the official style guidelines, which are contained in the style files, and they must be in PDF. Submission should be done via the START Conference Manager at https://www.softconf.com/acl2014/ComputEL.


<p "="">Funding possibilites

This workshop is being supported by U.S. National Science Foundation Award no. 1404352. Through this award, and related sources, funding may be available for those with accepted papers to attend the workshop, especially students. Please contact Jeff Good (jcgood@buffalo.edu) for further information.


<p "="">Important Dates

18 November 2013: First Call for Workshop Papers

9 February 2014: Second Call for Workshop Papers

14 March 2014: Workshop Paper Due Date 

11 April 2014: Notification of Acceptance

28 April 2014: Camera-ready papers due

26 or 27 June 2014: Workshop Dates


<p "="">Organizing committee

Jeff Good, University at Buffalo (jcgood@buffalo.edu)

Julia Hirschberg, Columbia University

Owen Rambow, Columbia University


<p "="">Program Committee

Steven Abney, University of Michigan

Helen Aristar-Dry, LINGUIST List

Alexandre Arkhipov, Moscow State University

Tim Baldwin, University of Melbourne

Dorothee Beermann, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Emily M. Bender, University of Washington

Andrea Berez, University of Hawaii

Steven Bird, University of Melbourne

Damir Cavar, Eastern Michigan University

Guy De Pauw, University of Antwerp

Sebastian Drude, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Harald Hammarström, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Judith Klavans, University of Maryland

Terry Langendoen, University of Arizona

Lori Levin, Carnegie Mellon University

Will Lewis, Microsoft

Mark Liberman, University of Pennsylvania

Worthy Martin, University of Virginia

Mike Maxwell, Center for the Advanced Study of Language

Steven Moran, University of Zurich

Alexander Nakhimovsky, Colgate University

Sebastian Nordhoff, Max Plank Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Alexis Palmer, Saarland University

Kevin Scannell, Saint Louis University

Gary Simons, SIL International

Nick Thieberger, University of Melbourne

Paul Trilsbeek, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Doug Whalen, CUNY Graduate Center

Menzo Windhouwer, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics

Fei Xia, University of Washington

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