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For first time since Depression, more Mexicans leave U.S. than enter

For first time since Depression, more Mexicans leave U.S. than enter | The World in 15 weeks | Scoop.it
A study sees a decline in immigration to the United States from Mexico after tightened border control, increased deportations, a flagging U.S. economy and a declining Mexican birthrate.

 

The wave of immigrants coming into the USA is something of the past. Push factors: Why are more Mexicans choosing to stay in Mexico?  Pull factors: Why is the United States less on an option for many would-be migrants these days?  Cross-border issues: How are issues on both sides of the border changing these patterns? 


Via Seth Dixon
Mikaela Kennedy's insight:

One of the last lines in this really stood out to me: "Mexicans would rather be in a precarious situation than a situation of fear."  I feel as though that is true for all people living on earth. 

more...
Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 10, 2012 12:44 PM
Personally I would figure it is partially due to the rescission lack of work equals lack of sustainability for families. You have to go where the jobs are, and if that is back to your native land then its that much more worth it.
James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 11:59 AM

(Mexico topic 3)

   Instead of focusing on the reasons behind the decline/reversal in Mexico-America immigration in my first topic, for this article I would like to mention how the facts cited differ so greatly from what is being broadcast and inferred from larger news agencies. Especially within the last few months, I would've thought that Mexican immigration into the US would be at an all-time high. Never would I have previously guessed that it would be closer to a net gain of near 0 (or even a net loss). This goes to show how news agencies "cater" to certain demographics of people and what they want to hear. To me it's like a lobbyist recruitment, trying to gain more supporters of a specific cause in hopes of achieving a specific goal.

   On a separate note, I was interested in the mention of how certain researchers believe the pattern could shift again once the US economy begins to further recover. I wonder if a rise in immigration would actually happen, given that Mexico's economy is now more developed and providing more opportunity? That's something to think about...

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 18, 11:54 AM
According to the report, the Mexican-born population, which had been increasing since 1970, peaked at 12.6 million in 2007 and has dropped to 12 million since then.-WashingtonPost

This is a staggering statistic.The tightening of border control, increase in deportations ,as well as a declining economy, have all contributed to this decrease in people coming into the U.S. from Mexico. People born in Mexico are also finding more oppurtunites at home and less desire to leave. There is no telling if this decline will be permanent or temporary, however many are speculating we will not see the strong numbers we saw in the 20th and early 21st centuries. This is a little concerning for me , I feel that when people do come to this country they should do it the leagal way ,however is it a cause for concer when the "land of oppurtunity" no longer seems to be the best choice.What is that saying about our country? Should we worry when people stop wanting to come here?

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Rescooped by Mikaela Kennedy from Geography Education
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Boston's unnatural shoreline

Boston's unnatural shoreline | The World in 15 weeks | Scoop.it
Today's 100-year storm surge could be tomorrow's high tide.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 5, 2013 3:05 PM

This set of maps and articles help to explain why sea level rise is such an issue for many major metropolitan areas.  In coastal cities with substantial economic development, much of the current coastal areas where once underwater until landfill projects filled in the bay.  During storm surges (or if and when sea levels rise) these will be the first places to flood.  


Tags: disasters, water, physical, Boston, weather and climate.

Charlotte Hoarau's curator insight, February 6, 2013 5:57 AM

Surging sea represented on an imagery background layer.

Color ramp should be graduated.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 10, 3:18 PM

Here's somehing to "Swett" over for those who live along the coast:

"Coastal cities are now living in what Brian Swett calls a “post-Sandy environment.” In this new reality, there is no more denying the specter of sea-level rise or punting on plans to prepare for it. And there is no more need to talk of climate change in abstract predictions and science-speak. We now know exactly what it could look like."

Keep in mind that as globalization expands, urbanizaion does as well, putting more and more people at this type of risk.

Rescooped by Mikaela Kennedy from Geography Education
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Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty

Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty | The World in 15 weeks | Scoop.it

Some four decades after welcoming foreign assembly plants and factories, known as maquiladoras, Mexico has seen only a trickle of its industrial and factory workers join the ranks of those who even slightly resemble a middle class.

 

Despite making such consumer goods like BlackBerry smartphones, plasma TVs, appliances and cars that most people in the US, for instance, consider necessities, Mexican workers in these factories seldom get to enjoy these items because, as this article argues, the labor system keeps them in poverty.  Foreign investment in these businesses keep unions out and attracts workers from poorer areas, allowing low-cost labor to prevail.  Less than $8 a day is the going wage - great for the bottom line and consumer prices but very bleak for those who toil in this system.


Via Seth Dixon
Mikaela Kennedy's insight:

Some U.S. politians complain that they can't live on $400,000 a year and these workers are living on $7.50 a day that's only $2,737.50 a year if they work every day. 

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JeanneSilvey's curator insight, November 9, 2013 11:40 AM

What still needs to change?

Olga Varlamov's curator insight, November 23, 2013 8:26 PM

This article talks about how the maquiladora labor system dosen't provide enough money for it's workers. Many in Mexico are living in poverty and can't afford much more than dinner because of their low wages.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 12:47 PM

The labor system keeps workers in Poverty. This is the argument that is transitioned by stating the fact that many factory workers are and will always remian in poverty if they have no oppurtunity to move up in the food chain and become educated in order to get themselves out of poverty. They need different skills in order to aquire a better job to create a better life.  

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For first time since Depression, more Mexicans leave U.S. than enter

For first time since Depression, more Mexicans leave U.S. than enter | The World in 15 weeks | Scoop.it
A study sees a decline in immigration to the United States from Mexico after tightened border control, increased deportations, a flagging U.S. economy and a declining Mexican birthrate.

 

The wave of immigrants coming into the USA is something of the past. Push factors: Why are more Mexicans choosing to stay in Mexico?  Pull factors: Why is the United States less on an option for many would-be migrants these days?  Cross-border issues: How are issues on both sides of the border changing these patterns? 


Via Seth Dixon
Mikaela Kennedy's insight:

One of the last lines in this really stood out to me: "Mexicans would rather be in a precarious situation than a situation of fear."  I feel as though that is true for all people living on earth. 

more...
Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 10, 2012 12:44 PM
Personally I would figure it is partially due to the rescission lack of work equals lack of sustainability for families. You have to go where the jobs are, and if that is back to your native land then its that much more worth it.
James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 11:59 AM

(Mexico topic 3)

   Instead of focusing on the reasons behind the decline/reversal in Mexico-America immigration in my first topic, for this article I would like to mention how the facts cited differ so greatly from what is being broadcast and inferred from larger news agencies. Especially within the last few months, I would've thought that Mexican immigration into the US would be at an all-time high. Never would I have previously guessed that it would be closer to a net gain of near 0 (or even a net loss). This goes to show how news agencies "cater" to certain demographics of people and what they want to hear. To me it's like a lobbyist recruitment, trying to gain more supporters of a specific cause in hopes of achieving a specific goal.

   On a separate note, I was interested in the mention of how certain researchers believe the pattern could shift again once the US economy begins to further recover. I wonder if a rise in immigration would actually happen, given that Mexico's economy is now more developed and providing more opportunity? That's something to think about...

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 18, 11:54 AM
According to the report, the Mexican-born population, which had been increasing since 1970, peaked at 12.6 million in 2007 and has dropped to 12 million since then.-WashingtonPost

This is a staggering statistic.The tightening of border control, increase in deportations ,as well as a declining economy, have all contributed to this decrease in people coming into the U.S. from Mexico. People born in Mexico are also finding more oppurtunites at home and less desire to leave. There is no telling if this decline will be permanent or temporary, however many are speculating we will not see the strong numbers we saw in the 20th and early 21st centuries. This is a little concerning for me , I feel that when people do come to this country they should do it the leagal way ,however is it a cause for concer when the "land of oppurtunity" no longer seems to be the best choice.What is that saying about our country? Should we worry when people stop wanting to come here?

Rescooped by Mikaela Kennedy from Geography Education
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Following 'Geography Education'

Following 'Geography Education' | The World in 15 weeks | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.

 

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Via Seth Dixon
Mikaela Kennedy's insight:

Interactive world map thing

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Emma Lafleur's curator insight, January 24, 2013 5:34 PM

A great interactive map to learn about different regions of the world.

chris tobin's curator insight, January 24, 2013 5:35 PM

This is a really cool map from class

Marie Schoeman's curator insight, February 20, 2013 4:07 AM

This site collects interesting sites on Geography Teaching. It is anticipated that there will also be articles on differentiation which could assist teachers to present Geography in an inclusive way.