The world around you! Issues effecting your community and communities around the world [CCS2.2]
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ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map

ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map | The world around you! Issues effecting your community and communities around the world [CCS2.2] | Scoop.it
Alex Sheerman's insight:

 

This interactive map of the many nations that make up Aboriginal Australia is a great resource to begin discussing the complexity of Indigenous culture and kinship systems. It can be linked to the outcome "CCS2.2 -Explains changes in the community and family life and evaluates the effects of these on different individuals, groups and environments", as it explores the many groups in which Aboriginal people identify with. 

 

This map also helps non-Indigenous students begin to see Australia from an Aboriginal person's perspective i.e. that Australia is a land of diversity, made of many nations and peoples. It is important that as teachers we recognise the fact that "Aboriginal knowledge systems are not just for Aboriginal students but the fundamental way in which all children learn to know their country" (Millroy 2011, p.40). When this shift occurs Indigenous perspectives can be easily included and introduced into classrooms. 

 

Lesson activity:

 

Using this online map have students find the Aboriginal Nation/tribe land that they live on. They can then research a little bit about the history of this nation/tribe. After they have researched they can present it in the form of a poster or PowerPoint. Teacher should scaffold the use of PowerPoint before hand to the students. Students can choose to do a different tribe if they like. Each of the presentations should be 30seconds - 1 minute long. They should include images and text.

The main teaching point is for students to understand that Indigenous people all come from different backgrounds with different languages and cultures. They have changed over time due to White settlement. 

 

Assessment:

 

Teacher can assess whether students have described an indigenous community correctly and have presented some of the changes that have occurred to the indigenous peoples in this community over time.

 

References:

 

Millroy, J. (2011). Incorporating and understanding different ways of knowing in the education of indigenous students. Research conference 2011 : Indigenous education : pathways to success : conference proceedings, Retrieved from http://research.acer.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1109&context=research_conference

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Sustainability of a historic community garden

Sustainability of a historic community garden | The world around you! Issues effecting your community and communities around the world [CCS2.2] | Scoop.it
Discover the history of a local community garden and find out about some of its new sustainable features. View this clip...
Alex Sheerman's insight:

 

This video explores how a particular school community in Edinborough has created a sustainable community garden. This video links well to the outcome "CCS2.2 -Explains changes in the community and family life and evaluates the effects of these on different individuals, groups and environments." as it explores how a community has changed and adapted over time to become more sustainable.

 

Lesson Activities: 

 

When using this for a stage 2 class it would be important to make sure they understand the term 'Sustainability' and what a community garden is for. This could be explored through a brainstorming exercise as a whole class. It would be helpful for the teacher to present further ways of being sustainable e.g. recycling and solar power, etc. The aim of this lesson should be to address the larger national and global issue of pollution. Teachers should encourage students to think about how this issue has changed the way communities operate and live. 

 

A further activity using this resource could be have students think of other ways in which communities have changed to become more sustainable and reduce pollution. They could work in groups of four to then develop a short 30 second - 1 minute speech about ways in which their local community is combating pollution by becoming more sustainable. The teacher is then able to assess how students have understood how global issues impact communities as well as improve student’s confidence and skills when presenting to an audience. Working in groups to do this task also creates an environment where kids want to learn and a place where "their contributions will be appreciated and respected." (Gilbert & Hoepper 2011, p.102).

 

A follow up to this activity can be to explore how communities have changed over time in order to cope with different issues i.e. pollution, poverty, global warming etc.

 

Links to other KLA's:

 

Advanced students could have a go at recording their own short film based off the presentation they created. This would link to the Creative Arts syllabus in particular Drama and Media Arts. 

 

References: 

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

 

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North West Rail Link - Homepage

North West Rail Link - Homepage | The world around you! Issues effecting your community and communities around the world [CCS2.2] | Scoop.it
The $8.3 billion North West Rail Link is Australia’s largest public transport infrastructure project currently under construction and a priority rail project for the NSW Government
Alex Sheerman's insight:

 

This website, provided by the NSW government, provides up to date information about the Northwest rail link being built from Sydney to the Northern Suburbs. This rail link will benefit and effect many students who live in this area. This website is a helpful resource for students who live in this area of Sydney. It links well with the outcome CSS 2.2 because it has a direct impact on local communities and families in the northern suburbs of Sydney. 

 

Features: 

The website is very helpful and is highly interactive. Videos and trip calculators can help students easily understand what impact this train link will have on their local area. Using a website like this can act as a "means of supporting a more holistic, multi-faceted approach to education"(Jefferies & Hussain 1998, p. 359), in particular gaining a rich understanding of local projects such as the Northwest Rail link.

It also contains many diagrams of the construction which can easily be linked to other KLA's such as Mathematics. An Idea for a maths lesson could be to work out how long the train line will be in kilometers and then convert it to meters.

While some of this website is to advanced for stage 2 it still has great features which are accessible for students of different learning levels in Stage 2. If this website appears to complex for the students themselves, teachers can at least use this site to gain an understanding of the effect that this train link will have on the local community.

 

Lesson activity: 

A lesson based off this website could be to have students create a poster on the impacts, benefits and negatives of this train link. By thinking this through students can begin to understand how communities are effective positively and negatively by projects such as this. After they have created their posters seperate students into groups based on whether they think the train link will be positive or negative for the community. They can then have a small informal debate about why they think this. This can help to develop their persuasive language as well as critical thinking. 

 

References:

 

Jefferies, P., & Hussain, F. (1998). Using the internet as a teaching resource. Education Training, 40(8), 359-365. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.ezproxy2.library.usyd.edu.au/journals.htm?articleid=837577

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WFP in the Sahel | WFP | United Nations World Food Programme - Fighting Hunger Worldwide

WFP in the Sahel | WFP | United Nations World Food Programme - Fighting Hunger Worldwide | The world around you! Issues effecting your community and communities around the world [CCS2.2] | Scoop.it
Alex Sheerman's insight:

 

The issue of world hunger and food shortages effects many people all over the world. I consider it to be an issue of high importance in which students in Australia should be educated about.

 

This resource directly address outcome CCS2.2 and the subject matter "family, school, local, national and global events and issues". It looks at the issue of food shortages in countries over Africa. A great resource which can be used in a lesson to help children learn about how food shortages effect communities in Africa. 

 

Learning activity:

Students can complete a jigsaw activity in which the teacher divides the class up into groups. Each group can pick a particular country and learn one fact about the country using the interactive map. Students will need access to computers during this lesson. A 'jigsaw' activity is beneficial to students because "using group work activities make the lessons more interesting and enjoyable" (Nair & Alwee 2012, p.5) as well as help students construct meaning in the learning together. They are to write down 5 key facts in their books, based off the map and the links provided. These facts should include how the families and communities have changed over time, linking in with outcome CCS2.2. 

After each group has found out their facts about the country of interest they report back to the group. This helps develop student’s explanation and presentation skills.

Have students in the other groups write down the facts that have been presented. Once this has been completed the whole class can recap the impact of poverty and hunger on families from around the world.

 

Assessment:

Students are to be assessed on their ability to explore and extrapolate relevant information from the website and present it simply to the rest of the group. The teacher should also observes the students ability to research and gather information. This can be done by collecting the information and research students have written down at the end of the lesson. 

 

Note for Teachers: 

This site has some videos which contain some images, such as malnourished children which may be upsetting for children in stage 2. It is recommended that you view the videos on the site before showing them to the class. 

 

 

References:

 

Nair, G. K. S., & Alwee, U. (2012). Group work in the secondary ESL classroom. Asian Social Science, 8(10), 3-7. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.library.usyd.edu.au/loginurl=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1033044645accountid=14757

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BBC. Seeking Refuge: Learning Zone - YouTube

Five animated stories giving a unique insight into the lives of young people who have sought refuge in the UK, told by the children themselves. These powerfu...
Alex Sheerman's insight:

 

The issue of violence and war is a global one and, sadly, has relevance in all culture. The effects of war on families can be seen throughout the world. In particular in the lives of refugees. This is a series of short animated films which present different stories of refugee children. It explores the reasons behind why refuges have to escape their country. The films also effectively capture the feelings of the children when they go to a new country. This is important as the best resources to use when teaching human rights are the ones that "present authentic scenarios and real life case studies that require students to critically think and respond" (Gilbert & Hoepper 2011, p.373). In the case of these videos, they are effective as it is children telling the stories. This allows for stage 2 students to connect with the stories more easily as well as develop empathy and understanding. It also allows students to s families and communities due to Global issues such as war.

 

Lesson activity:

 

Have a class discussion about some of the main ways the families in the films were effected by war and violence. What happened to them? what did they have to change? After this discussion students can create a short role play in response to one of the videos they have watched. They can do this in groups of four. It may be helpful to have a whole class discussion before the role plays in order to bring out the key ideas from the videos.   Role plays are a great way of helping students to develop empathy for the other. They could translate the stories into an Australian context. Students should create a role play based on the idea of a family having to move due to violence around them. Make sure students focus on the changes that take place in the family and the stress that they under go. Examples from the above resource are Children constantly moving school, social pressures, isolation, insecurity and loss of identity.

 

Assessment: 

Teacher can observe the role plays and assess whether students have responded appropriately to the stimulus and have understood how violence and war effects communities and families. 

 

Important Considerations:

 

It is important to consider that some students in the classroom may in fact be refugees themselves. Therefore it is important to be sensitive when showing videos like this as it may cause students to experience discomfort.

 

References: 

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

 

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