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The Great Language Game

The Great Language Game | the world | Scoop.it
Challenge yourself to identify some seventy languages by their sound alone. Learn more about how languages sound and where they're spoken.

Via Seth Dixon
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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 11:59 AM

A game where you can test your knowledge of global tongues only by sound.

The knowledge of languages is important in movement especially for migrants and immigrants and participators in global trade.

Debi Ray Kidd's curator insight, July 21, 4:52 PM

Make sure you look up the languages that you don't know to determine where they're spoken.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 8:20 PM

unit 3-- use in class

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Controversial 'filial piety' law comes into effect in China

Controversial 'filial piety' law comes into effect in China | the world | Scoop.it
Law mandates that children regularly visit their parents and avoid "overlooking or neglecting" elders, although the specific punishment isn't clear.

 

"Imagine a world where it was illegal not to visit your ageing parents. Where your grandpa could take you to court for not paying him enough attention. That world exists, and it's called China. As of this week, the country has a new law that forbids "overlooking or neglecting the elderly."

It's not clear what exactly lies in store for you if you don't, and many Chinese internet users have criticized the legislation as unworkable and overly moralizing. But anyone commenting online, we might fairly assume, probably isn't one of the old people the law is intended to protect.

 

At least one senior citizen has already used it to her advantage: a 77-year-old woman from Wuxi successfully petitioned a court to order her daughter to spend time with her "at least once every two months, and on at least two of China's national holidays." What happy occasions those will be. "

 

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/afp/130702/grandmother-77-wins-first-china-neglect-case

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Jordan Anderson- www.havefunandprofit.com's comment, July 3, 2013 3:26 AM
what the hell!
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It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders

It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders | the world | Scoop.it

"Most of us think of international borders as invisible, but clear-cut lines: stand on one side, and you’re in one country; stand on the other, you’re in another country.  But here’s a list of five international borders that, for one reason or another, are not quite that simple."


Via Seth Dixon, Karen Moles Rose
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 2013 9:20 AM

This article is in dire needs of some maps, but it still provides 5 intriguing case studies of borders and chunks of territory that defy normal categorization.


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, July 13, 2013 12:53 PM

It  is  Puzzling, but  every  human  being  chose to live in a normal,  happy  and  free  country, in a  Democratie,  if  possible.

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:20 PM

These borders and boundaries indicate something that I thought of while rewatching Independence Day (the Smith/Goldblum flick from '96)...  If we make a mess, and destroy this planet, aliens wouldn't want it.  The land that no one wants, is probably wanted by someone in reality... I am a fervent believer in aliens, and spend my free time diving into attempts to solve my quandary about the higher questions of the universe.  I think that the area that no one wants, everyone wants.  Unlike state boundaries in the US, planets are divided as separate entities from other planets, but grouped in solar systems, galaxies, asteroid belts, etc... I can't wait for the day some pompous fool gets on the bridge of a starship from Earth and sits in the captain's chair and says "Lieutenant, take us to Sector ----- (so and so)"... We will have moved up from the United States and Canada to the United Sectors of Galaxies!  And that little bit of land that 'no one wants,' everyone actually wants... same with planets.  Terraforming will allow those unsightly balls of fury that float around a star to become the most inhabitable of them all!  I wonder where these things will stop... or if it keeps going to larger sectors, endlessly? Well, we will likely encounter other species with territorial claims... play nice, America!  Or the Aliens will pop out of your stomach.  Though there are some politicians now that seem to have popped out of someone's stomach, I think the threat is more domestic while territory disputes occur nowadays, as it is humans arguing with humans, but it will increase when the Martians come to claim what is theirs.

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WATCH: Europe's History In Just Minutes

WATCH: Europe's History In Just Minutes | the world | Scoop.it
Always wanted to learn more about European history but could never find the time? Look no further than the time-lapse map in the video above, which has boiled down the continent's history into just three-and-a-half minutes.

Via Jose Soto
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How a distaste for 'pagan food' first put the British off horsemeat

How a distaste for 'pagan food' first put the British off horsemeat | the world | Scoop.it
Catholic guilt first put the British off the idea of eating horses almost 1,500 years ago, archaeologists have concluded.

 

A new study of the eating habits of the Anglo Saxons suggests that they may have developed a strong distaste for horsemeat because they saw it as a “pagan” food.

The findings, published in the Oxford Journal of Archaeology, could help explain the level of revulsion at the recent revelations that consumers have been eating horsemeat uwittingly.

Evidence from animal bones found at settlement sites across England shows that horses appear to have been eaten on special occasions in the early Anglo Saxon period.


Via David Connolly
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101 Super Sites for Social Studies Teachers

101 Super Sites for Social Studies Teachers | the world | Scoop.it
A list of the top 101 websites for social studies, U.S. history, world history, government, economics and civics teachers.

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Mohamed Cherif's curator insight, July 30, 2013 10:42 AM

Amazing

 

Mohamed Cherif's curator insight, July 30, 2013 10:59 AM

A wonderful source of different materials that, you teacher, will certainly enjoy and then introduce your students to a variety of activities...

Mohamed Cherif's comment, July 30, 2013 11:00 AM
Amazing
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How the languages we speak affects the way we think

What can economists learn from linguists?

Tags: language, culture, economic, TED.


Via Seth Dixon, Karen Moles Rose
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Anne-Lous van den Ende's curator insight, May 7, 2013 11:18 AM

Intersting video on how the different languages we speak could affect our way of thinking.

Jack Born's curator insight, November 6, 2013 7:39 PM

I have never thought of this. I didn't even realise how different languages and cultures can be and how the tiny things effect the entire language.This demostrates why some languages are beter than others in their own way. 

Ms. Brin's curator insight, August 28, 2:12 AM

Very interesting!

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Understanding Global Statistics

Understanding Global Statistics | the world | Scoop.it

"Infographics to explain global statistics."


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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, August 27, 2013 3:49 PM

Un conjunto de sencillas infografias para visualizar estadisticas de la humanidad en el tiempo presente

trampolinecalf's comment, September 27, 2013 2:46 AM
good one
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:11 PM

If the World was 100 People shows the statistics of the world as in smaller proportions allowing them to be easily visualized.

Some of the graphics divide the people into regions and nationalities mainly as Formal by continents .

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Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries

Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries | the world | Scoop.it

"Europe and Asia, while often considered two separate continents, both lie on the same landmass or tectonic plate, the Eurasian supercontinent. The historic and geographic story of the Eurasian boundary is intriguing."


Via Neal G. Lineback, Seth Dixon, Karen Moles Rose
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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 3:14 AM

Here we can see that the continental boundary between Russia and the rest of Europe has historically been solely based on national borders. However, a large majority of Russia's population and major cities are in the western part of the country, which is closer to Europe than most Asian countries.  Because of this, Europe and Asia gained an imaginary cultural border. It only makes sense that part of Russia began to be considered a European region even though it physically is a part of Asia.  It is better to talk about the entire land mass of Eurasia rather than two split continents when talking about Russia's borders.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 11:06 AM

I find this discussion very interesting.  How we define the boarders of the continents may not seem important but they do hold much in the way of historical and cultural meanings.  Is Europe separate from Asia or is it one super-continent?  The answer to that has many implications politically and culturally as well as historically.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2:26 PM

If Europe and Asia are not different continents based on the tectonic plates that they both share, would that mean that Russia is in a fact a part of Europe. Wouldn't its ties be closely link to that of Asia, because growing up in school, I was taught that Russia was closely related to the Asian continent than it was to Europe. Though Russia is sometimes perceived as being its own continent, I wonder what this discovery will mean for them long term.

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The Entire History of the World—Really, All of It—Distilled Into a Single Gorgeous Chart

The Entire History of the World—Really, All of It—Distilled Into a Single Gorgeous Chart | the world | Scoop.it
This “Histomap,” created by John B. Sparks, was first printed by Rand McNally in 1931. (The David Rumsey Map Collection hosts a fully zoomable version here.)

Via Seth Dixon
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Shelby Redman's curator insight, December 2, 2013 2:23 PM

This is really neat

Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, January 24, 7:38 PM

Often times I find it hard to think of history as simply a recolection of time. Youspend your childhood looking at timelines and learning history linearly you often forget that this is not the case. I found this work to be very asthetically pleasing and helpful as well.

Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, January 24, 7:55 PM

Often times I find it hard to think of history as simply a recolection of time. Youspend your childhood looking at timelines and learning history linearly you often forget that this is not the case. I found this work to be very asthetically pleasing and helpful as well.

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Colour photographs of Imperial Russia - Retronaut

Colour photographs of Imperial Russia - Retronaut | the world | Scoop.it

“The photographs of Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863-1944) offer a vivid portrait of a lost world – the Russian Empire on the eve of World War I and the coming revolution. His subjects ranged from the medieval churches and monasteries of old Russia, to the railroads and factories of an emerging industrial power, to the daily life and work of Russia’s diverse population.”


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1 Kitty, 2 Empires, 2,000 Years: World History Told Through a Brick

1 Kitty, 2 Empires, 2,000 Years: World History Told Through a Brick | the world | Scoop.it

At some moment a few years after Jesus Christ died but before the second century began, someone made a brick on the island that would become the cornerstone of Great Britain.

 

The area was controlled by Rome then, and known as Britannia  and as the brick lay green, awaiting the kiln, a cat walked across the wet clay and left its footprints before wandering off to do something else. The clay was fired, the prints fixed, and the brick itself presumably became a piece of a building or road.

 

Two thousand years later, a Sonoma State master's student named Kristin Converse was poking around the holdings of the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site in Washington state. She was writing her thesis on the business and technology of brickmaking in Portlandia (known more formally as the Willamette Valley). A brick caught her eye. It was part of an odd group that was not of local origin. In one corner, there were the footprints of a cat. Where had this cat lived?

 


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David Connolly's curator insight, February 24, 2013 4:32 AM

I love these sort of stories!

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Italy set for watershed election which could shape the future of one of Europe's biggest economies as Silvio Berlusconi seeks unlikely political comeback

Italy set for watershed election which could shape the future of one of Europe's biggest economies as Silvio Berlusconi seeks unlikely political comeback | the world | Scoop.it
Italy is going to the polls today and tomorrow for a watershed parliamentary election that could shape the future of one of Europe's biggest economies.
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38 Maps You Never Knew You Needed

38 Maps You Never Knew You Needed | the world | Scoop.it

"Some prime examples of fascinating maps." 


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Jordan Macpherson's comment, November 4, 2013 11:50 PM
CRAZY!
Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 27, 7:46 PM

This shows 38 maps of the world in completely different formats with different map projections and colorings. 

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 11:43 AM

Map number 7 shows what New Yorkers complain about the most in their beloved city. The complaints are split into noise, graffiti and litter. It is no surprise that most New Yorkers complain about noise in Manhattan, well because it is one of the largest cities in the world, of course there is going to be noise. And then looking on the outskirts of the main city in Manhattan there are mostly complaints about litter. The map is mostly blue in most areas. As for graffiti there are a couple pockets spread out which is where I’m assuming most gang activity takes place. Queens, the Bronx, and Brooklyn is where most of the graffiti is located according to this map. I liked this ma because it shows what you’re going to see or hear in certain places in the City area.