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12 #Health Benefits of Coconut Oil

12 #Health Benefits of Coconut Oil | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Coconut oil is easily available and at is also inexpensive. There are numerous health benefits of coconut oil, which includes...
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Nature and the universe are a wonder. Insufficiently explored...
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Clean energy generated using #bacteria-powered #solar panel #renewables #science

Clean energy generated using #bacteria-powered #solar panel #renewables #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
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How #quantum #biology might explain life’s biggest questions #science

How #quantum #biology might explain life’s biggest questions #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
How does a robin know to fly south? The answer might be weirder than you think: Quantum physics may be involved.
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#Scientists work toward storing digital information in #DNA #tech #ICT #science

#Scientists work toward storing digital information in #DNA #tech #ICT #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Her computer, Karin Strauss says, contains her "digital attic"—a place where she stores that published math paper she wrote in high school, and computer science schoolwork from college.

She'd like to preserve the stuff "as long as I live, at least," says Strauss, 37. But computers must be replaced every few years, and each time she must copy the information over, "which is a little bit of a headache."

It would be much better, she says, if she could store it in DNA—the stuff our genes are made of.

Strauss, who works at Microsoft Research in Redmond, Washington, is working to make that sci-fi fantasy a reality.

She and other scientists are not focused in finding ways to stow high school projects or snapshots or other things an average person might accumulate, at least for now. Rather, they aim to help companies and institutions archive huge amounts of data for decades or centuries, at a time when the world is generating digital data faster than it can store it.

Via Mariaschnee
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#FF Study reveals Leonardo da Vinci's 'irrelevant' scribbles mark the spot where he first recorded the laws of friction #history

#FF Study reveals Leonardo da Vinci's 'irrelevant' scribbles mark the spot where he first recorded the laws of friction #history | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
A new detailed study of notes and sketches by Leonardo da Vinci has identified a page of scribbles in a tiny notebook as the place where Leonardo first recorded the laws of friction. The research also shows that he went on to apply this knowledge repeatedly to mechanical problems for more than 20 years.

Scribbled notes and sketches on a page in a notebook by Leonardo da Vinci, previously dismissed as irrelevant by an art historian, have been identified as the place where he first recorded his understanding of the laws of friction.

The research by Professor Ian Hutchings, Professor of Manufacturing Engineering at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St John's College, is the first detailed chronological study of Leonardo's work on friction, and has also shown how he continued to apply his knowledge of the subject to wider work on machines over the next two decades.

It is widely known that Leonardo conducted the first systematic study of friction, which underpins the modern science of "tribology", but exactly when and how he developed these ideas has been uncertain until now.

Professor Hutchings has discovered that Leonardo's first statement of the laws of friction is in a tiny notebook measuring just 92 mm x 63 mm. The book, which dates from 1493 and is now held in the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, contains a statement scribbled quickly in Leonardo's characteristic "mirror writing" from right to left.

Ironically the page had already attracted interest because it also carries a sketch of an old woman in black pencil with a line below reading "cosa bella mortal passa e non dura", which can be translated as "mortal beauty passes and does not last". Amid debate surrounding the significance of the quote and speculation that the sketch could represent an aged Helen of Troy, the Director of the V & A in the 1920s referred to the jottings below as "irrelevant notes and diagrams in red chalk".

Via Mariaschnee
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#Google Cuts Its Giant Electricity Bill With #DeepMind-Powered # #TECH #ict #AI

#Google Cuts Its Giant Electricity Bill With #DeepMind-Powered # #TECH #ict #AI | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Google just paid for part of its acquisition of DeepMind in a surprising way.
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Study shows direct manipulation of #brain can reverse effects of #depression

Study shows direct manipulation of #brain can reverse effects of #depression | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Manipulating the brain has been a tool used in the treatment of mental illness for centuries, and treatments have often been controversial
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New #brain map identifies 97 previously unknown regions #science

New #brain map identifies 97 previously unknown regions #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
reddit: the front page of the internet
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Life of the #Buddha

Life of the #Buddha | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Dharma Collection — books, lectures, pictures, audio, video ☢ promienie

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promienie's curator insight, July 20, 6:08 PM
The Life of the #Buddha - According to the Pali Canon — by Bhikkhu Nanamoli
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#Whales Mourn Their Dead, Just Like Us #biology #mind #love

#Whales Mourn Their Dead, Just Like Us #biology #mind #love | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Seven species of the marine mammals have been seen clinging to the dead body of a likely friend or relative, a new study says.
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The first American to orbit the Earth turns 95 years old #astronaut

The first American to orbit the Earth turns 95 years old #astronaut | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is celebrating John H. Glenn’s 95th birthday on Monday.
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Weird #quantum effects stretch across hundreds of miles #physics #science

Weird #quantum effects stretch across hundreds of miles #physics #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
In the world of quantum, infinitesimally small particles, weird and often logic-defying behaviors abound. Perhaps the strangest of these is the idea of superposition, in which objects can exist simultaneously in two or more seemingly counterintuitive states. For example, according to the laws of quantum mechanics, electrons may spin both clockwise and counter-clockwise, or be both at rest and excited, at the same time.

The physicist Erwin Schrödinger highlighted some strange consequences of the idea of superposition more than 80 years ago, with a thought experiment that posed that a cat trapped in a box with a radioactive source could be in a superposition state, considered both alive and dead, according to the laws of quantum mechanics. Since then, scientists have proven that particles can indeed be in superposition, at quantum, subatomic scales. But whether such weird phenomena can be observed in our larger, everyday world is an open, actively pursued question.

Now, MIT physicists have found that subatomic particles called neutrinos can be in superposition, without individual identities, when traveling hundreds of miles. Their results, to be published later this month in Physical Review Letters, represent the longest distance over which quantum mechanics has been tested to date.

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Russian Man Doesn’t Give a Damn About Bear Roaming Nearby #VIDEO 

Russian Man Doesn’t Give a Damn About Bear Roaming Nearby #VIDEO  | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

We all knew Russians are tough… but this man may just be the bravest. Check out how he isn’t fazed at all by a bear roaming around right beside him.
WARNING: STRONG LANGUAGE


Via The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California
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#science #breaking Telescope Fnds Hundreds of Previously Undetectable Galaxies #astronomy #science

#science #breaking Telescope Fnds Hundreds of Previously Undetectable Galaxies #astronomy #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
A South African radio telescope has revealed hundreds of galaxies in a tiny corner of the universe where only 70 had been seen before.

Via The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California
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This #woman #scientist made a #Nobel-winning discovery but never got credit for it during her lifetime

This #woman #scientist made a #Nobel-winning discovery but never got credit for it during her lifetime | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Her work was pivotal in discovering DNA's structure, but she never received credit for it during her lifetime.
Via Mariaschnee
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First Proof That Wild Animals Really Can Communicate With Us

First Proof That Wild Animals Really Can Communicate With Us | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
A long-known relationship between African men who harvest honey and a bird called a honeyguide allows both species to get the delectable treat.
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#FF #Scientists program cells to remember and respond to series of stimuli #DNA #memory

#FF #Scientists program cells to remember and respond to series of stimuli #DNA #memory | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Synthetic biology allows researchers to program cells to perform novel functions such as fluorescing in response to a particular chemical or producing drugs in response to disease markers. In a step toward devising much more complex cellular circuits, MIT engineers have now programmed cells to remember and respond to a series of events.

These cells can remember, in the correct order, up to three different inputs, but this approach should be scalable to incorporate many more stimuli, the researchers say. Using this system, scientists can track cellular events that occur in a particular order, create environmental sensors that store complex histories, or program cellular trajectories.

"You can build very complex computing systems if you integrate the element of memory together with computation," says Timothy Lu, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science and of biological engineering, and head of the Synthetic Biology Group at MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics.

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Physicists have discovered what looks like an entire family of new particles in the #LHC #physics #science #FF

Physicists have discovered what looks like an entire family of new particles in the #LHC #physics #science #FF | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
They can’t be explained by our existing laws of physics.

 

The new particles have been named X(4140), X(4274), X(4500), and X(4700) after their respective masses, and each one has been found to contain a unique combination of two charm quarks and two strange quarks.

 

This makes them the first four-quark particles found to be composed entirely of heavy quarks, Symmetry reports.

 

By 'exciting' the individual quarks inside their new tetraquark particles, the researchers were able to observe their unique internal structure, mass, and quantum numbers. In doing so, they discovered something that doesn’t fit with current physics models that work with so-called ordinary particles, such as composite hadrons built from either a quark and an anti-quark, or three separate quarks, CERN reports.

 

Physicists are now trying to come up with new models to explain their results. The results have been published in two papers on the pre-print website arXiv.org here and here, so are now going to be scrutinized by independent physicists ahead of the formal peer-review process. 

 

The discovers are expecting one of two possibilities to be confirmed with further research: theoretical physicists are either going to have to explain the existence of this new family of particles, or they could be identified as the result of strange 'ripple effects' emanating from never-before-seen behaviors of existing particles.


Via Ben van Lier, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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We've Been Wrong About #Lichen For 150 Years #biology #science

We've Been Wrong About #Lichen For 150 Years #biology #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Hundreds of millions of years ago, a tiny green microbe joined forces with a fungus, and together they conquered the world. It’s a tale of two cross-kingdom organisms, one providing food and the one other shelter, and it’s been our touchstone example of symbiosis for 150 years. Trouble is, that story is nowhere near complete.

 

A sweeping genetic analysis of lichen has revealed a third symbiotic organism, hiding in plain sight alongside the familiar two, that has eluded scientists for decades. The stowaway is another fungus, a basidiomycete yeast. It’s been found in 52 genera of lichen across six continents, indicating that it is an extremely widespread, if not ubiquitous, part of the symbiosis. And according to molecular dating, it’s probably been along for the ride since the beginning.

 

“I think this will require some rewriting of the textbooks,” said Catharine Aime, a mycologist at Purdue University and co-author on the study published today in Science.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Peter Buckland's curator insight, July 23, 4:14 AM
A fascinating discovery
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Changement climatique : les températures continuent à monter, monter, monter #France #EU

Changement climatique : les températures continuent à monter, monter, monter #France #EU | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Selon la NASA, les six premiers mois de 2016 ont été les plus chauds jamais enregistrés sur la planète, avec 1,3°C de plus qu'à la fin du 19ème siècle.

Via Hubert MESSMER @Zehub on Twitter, degrowth economy and ecology
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#Zika Isn’t The Biggest Mosquito-Transmitted Disease Plaguing #Brazil #dengue

#Zika Isn’t The Biggest Mosquito-Transmitted Disease Plaguing #Brazil #dengue | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Rio de Janeiro alone has seen 8,133 cases of dengue in 2016, which is six times higher than the reported number this time last year — and double the number of people sickened by Zika in all of Brazil.
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First half of 2016 hit record-setting global warmth In 100 years nobody reads this, sixth #extinction

First half of 2016 hit record-setting global warmth In 100 years nobody reads this, sixth #extinction | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
We’re pretty much guaranteed to surpass 2015 for the warmest year on record.
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#Auroras Make Weird Noises, and Now We Know Why #science

#Auroras Make Weird Noises, and Now We Know Why #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
A new theory offers what may be the best explanation yet for hisses and pops heard during powerful light displays.
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#ALMA captures first-ever image of a #protostar’s snow line #astronomy #physics #science

#ALMA captures first-ever image of a #protostar’s snow line #astronomy #physics #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
It might be time to revise our models of planet formation.
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#Scientists warn of 'unsafe' decline in #biodiversity - BBC News

#Scientists warn of 'unsafe' decline in #biodiversity - BBC News | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
An international team of scientists has issued a warning that biodiversity is dropping below safe levels for the support and wellbeing of human societies.
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Viruses may have been major driver of human evolution: Study Interesting or not? #DNA #Aliens #science

Viruses may have been major driver of human evolution: Study Interesting or not? #DNA #Aliens #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
In a new study, researchers apply big-data analysis to reveal the full extent of viruses' impact on the evolution of humans and other mammals.
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Egypt's Oldest Papyrus Reveals Lives of Pyramid Builders | Mysterious Universe

Egypt's Oldest Papyrus Reveals Lives of Pyramid Builders | Mysterious Universe | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
The oldest Egyptian papyrus is unveiled to the public for the first time and reveals details about the lives of workers who built the Great Pyramid of Giza.
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