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Study Suggests That #Meditation Changes The Body’s Gene Expression

Study Suggests That #Meditation Changes The Body’s Gene Expression | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Via ScienceDaily, how changing your mind changes your body:
A new study by researchers in Wisconsin, Spain, and France reports the first evidence of specific molecular changes in the body following a period of mindfulness meditation.
CineversityTV's insight:

Mind over matter

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Nature and the universe are a wonder. Insufficiently explored...
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Clean energy generated using #bacteria-powered #solar panel #renewables #science

Clean energy generated using #bacteria-powered #solar panel #renewables #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
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#Cancer surpasses heart disease as the leading cause of death in #California and 21 other states

#Cancer surpasses heart disease as the leading cause of death in #California and 21 other states | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
In nearly half of U.S. states, more people are dying of cancer than of heart disease, according to a new report from the CDC.
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Can #Music Make Us Smarter and Help Us #Heal Faster?

Can #Music Make Us Smarter and Help Us #Heal Faster? | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Music may put us in a better mood or help us relax, but how far does our mind’s connection to music go? Can it make us smarter or even help us heal faster after surgery?
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Werner #Herzog Thinks the #Internet May Destroy Us

Werner #Herzog Thinks the #Internet May Destroy Us | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
And now, nearly a half century after its beginnings, where are we? Herzog takes us to a place near Seattle where victims of Internet addiction are treated; a rural haven where there are no Internet signals, where humans who would die if they were exposed to Wi-Fi signals are forced to live (for real!); a revealing interview with Bay Area entrepreneur Elon Musk on how the Internet might ultimately save humankind and allow us to populate other planets; a talk with Stanford Professor Sebastian Thrun on the potential of Wi-Fi-enhanced artificial intelligence; and a scientist who warns that just the right type of solar flare will destroy the Internet and lead to mass chaos, possibly throwing civilization back to a kind of Middle Ages.

Via The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California
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Mold and #fungi lurking in instrument blamed for death of #bagpipe player

Mold and #fungi lurking in instrument blamed for death of #bagpipe player | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Doctors are warning musicians who play wind instruments of a potential hazard they have dubbed ‘bagpipe lung.’ They say it killed a 61-year-old musician.
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34kg #pearl found in #Philippines 'is world's biggest' other #news

34kg #pearl found in #Philippines 'is world's biggest' other #news | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Philippine officials believe they may have recovered the biggest natural giant clam pearl in the world - weighing a whopping 34kg (5.2 stone).
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It's Official: The #LHC Didn't Find a New #Particle #Physics #Science #MSM

It's Official: The #LHC Didn't Find a New #Particle #Physics #Science #MSM | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
It’s been confirmed that early hints of a possible exotic new particle at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland have vanished.
Via Riaz Khan
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#MSM #science The findings from this most recent study on #LSD are ... trippy! #neurology #cannabis

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#Japan Government Officially Lists THIS #Ancient #Medicinal #Mushroom as a #Cancer Treatment.

#Japan Government Officially Lists THIS #Ancient #Medicinal #Mushroom as a #Cancer Treatment. | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Mushrooms aren’t everybody’s cup of tea, but there’s certainly an abundance of them in nature. Over 10,00 species of mushrooms are known to man, and all but 50-100 of them are edible.

Certain varieties are prized for their abilities, like Tochukasu, which increases ATP production, boosts endurance and strength, and fights aging and Cordyceps, which are used to fight respiratory disorders and improve liver function (5,6).

Via Poppen Report, Eric Larson, The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California
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Eric Larson's curator insight, August 16, 7:44 PM
Mushrooms help with cancer.
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Synthetic circuits integrating logic and memory in living cells #tech #biology #science

Synthetic circuits integrating logic and memory in living cells #tech #biology #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Via Gerd Moe-Behrens, Alfonso Rodriguez-Paton
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Gerd Moe-Behrens's curator insight, February 10, 2013 5:40 PM

by
Piro Siuti,John Yazbek& Timothy K Lu

"Logic and memory are essential functions of circuits that generate complex, state-dependent responses. Here we describe a strategy for efficiently assembling synthetic genetic circuits that use recombinases to implement Boolean logic functions with stable DNA-encoded memory of events. Application of this strategy allowed us to create all 16 two-input Boolean logic functions in living Escherichia coli cells without requiring cascades comprising multiple logic gates. We demonstrate long-term maintenance of memory for at least 90 cell generations and the ability to interrogate the states of these synthetic devices with fluorescent reporters and PCR. Using this approach we created two-bit digital-to-analog converters, which should be useful in biotechnology applications for encoding multiple stable gene expression outputs using transient inputs of inducers. We envision that this integrated logic and memory system will enable the implementation of complex cellular state machines, behaviors and pathways for therapeutic, diagnostic and basic science applications."

http://bit.ly/123ToU3

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#Scientists think Bronze Age #brain surgeons used #cannabis, #mushrooms and #dancing as painkillers

#Scientists think Bronze Age #brain surgeons used #cannabis, #mushrooms and #dancing as painkillers | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
RT @RawStory: Scientists think Bronze Age brain surgeons used cannabis, shrooms and dancing as painkillers https://t.co/YeppcsFjrI
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#FF Natural scale #caterpillar soft #robot is powered and controlled with light #tech #science

#FF Natural scale #caterpillar soft #robot is powered and controlled with light #tech #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw, using the liquid crystal elastomer technology, originally developed in the LENS Institute in Florence, demonstrated a bioinspired micro-robot capable of mimicking caterpillar gaits in natural scale. The 15-millimeter long soft robot harvests energy from green light and is controlled by spatially modulated laser beam. Apart from travelling on flat surfaces, it can also climb slopes, squeeze through narrow slits and transport loads.

For decades scientists and engineers have been trying to build robots mimicking different modes of locomotion found in nature. Most of these designs have rigid skeletons and joints driven by electric or pneumatic actuators. In nature, however, a vast number of creatures navigate their habitats using soft bodies - earthworms, snails and larval insects can effectively move in complex environments using different strategies. Up to date, attempts to create soft robots were limited to larger scale (typically tens of centimeters), mainly due to difficulties in power management and remote control.

Liquid Crystalline Elastomers (LCEs) are smart materials that can exhibit large shape change under illumination with visible light. With the recently developed techniques, it is possible to pattern these soft materials into arbitrary three dimensional forms with a pre-defined actuation performance. The light-induced deformation allows a monolithic LCE structure to perform complex actions without numerous discrete actuators.

Researchers from the University of Warsaw with colleagues from LESN (Italy) and Cambridge (UK) have now developed a natural-scale soft caterpillar robot with an opto-mechanical liquid crystalline elastomer monolithic design. The robot body is made of a light sensitive elastomer stripe with patterned molecular alignment. By controlling the travelling deformation pattern the robot mimics different gaits of its natural relatives. It can also walk up a slope, squeeze through a slit and push objects as heavy as ten times its own mass, demonstrating its ability to perform in challenging environments and pointing at potential future applications.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Engineers program human cells to store complex histories in their #DNA #biology #tech like #Nature does...#LOL

Engineers program human cells to store complex histories in their #DNA #biology #tech like #Nature does...#LOL | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
MIT biological engineers have devised a way to record complex histories in the DNA of human cells, allowing them to retrieve "memories" of past events, such as inflammation, by sequencing the DNA.

This analog memory storage system—the first that can record the duration and/or intensity of events in human cells—could also help scientists study how cells differentiate into various tissues during embryonic development, how cells experience environmental conditions, and how they undergo genetic changes that lead to disease.

"To enable a deeper understanding of biology, we engineered human cells that are able to report on their own history based on genetically encoded recorders," says Timothy Lu, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science, and of biological engineering. This technology should offer insights into how gene regulation and other events within cells contribute to disease and development, he adds.

Lu, who is head of the Synthetic Biology Group at MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics, is the senior author of the new study, which appears in the Aug. 18 online edition of Science. The paper's lead authors are Samuel Perli SM '10, PhD '15 and graduate student Cheryl Cui.

Via Mariaschnee
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Simulating 1 second of human #brain activity takes 82,944 processors #Tech #science

Simulating 1 second of human #brain activity takes 82,944 processors #Tech #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
How much computing power does it take to model a working human brain? A lot more than you think.

Via Scott Turner
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Using #DNA tests to let #women with breast #cancer skip chemo #medicine

Using #DNA tests to let #women with breast #cancer skip chemo #medicine | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Women with early breast cancer can safely skip chemo if a DNA test finds low risk of metastasis — even if traditional medical tests find higher risk.


Via Integrated DNA Technologies
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Physical Force Upregulates Gene Expression #gentech

Physical Force Upregulates Gene Expression #gentech | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Applying a mechanical force that pulls on a cell stretches chromatin, facilitating transcription, scientists show.


Via Integrated DNA Technologies
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#Soil An essential ingredient to healthy food and nutrition #GMO #pesticides #herbicides are poisoning it.

#Soil An essential ingredient to healthy food and nutrition #GMO #pesticides #herbicides are poisoning it. | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
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„Artificial Atom“ Created in Graphene #cool #science #Bladerunner #biology

„Artificial Atom“ Created in Graphene #cool #science #Bladerunner #biology | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

In a tiny quantum prison, electrons behave quite differently as compared to their counterparts in free space. They can only occupy discrete energy levels, much like the electrons in an atom -- for this reason, such electron prisons are often called "artificial atoms." Artificial atoms may also feature properties beyond those of conventional ones, with the potential for many applications for example in quantum computing. Such additional properties have now been shown for artificial atoms in the carbon material graphene. The results have been published in the journal Nano Letters, the project was a collaboration of scientists from TU Wien (Vienna, Austria), RWTH Aachen (Germany) and the University of Manchester (GB).

 

"Artificial atoms open up new, exciting possibilities, because we can directly tune their properties," says Professor Joachim Burgdörfer (TU Wien, Vienna). In semiconductor materials such as gallium arsenide, trapping electrons in tiny confinements has already been shown to be possible. These structures are often referred to as "quantum dots." Just like in an atom, where the electrons can only circle the nucleus on certain orbits, electrons in these quantum dots are forced into discrete quantum states.

Even more interesting possibilities are opened up by using graphene, a material consisting of a single layer of carbon atoms, which has attracted a lot of attention in the last few years.

 

"In most materials, electrons may occupy two different quantum states at a given energy. The high symmetry of the graphene lattice allows for four different quantum states. This opens up new pathways for quantum information processing and storage" explains Florian Libisch from TU Wien. However, creating well-controlled artificial atoms in graphene turned out to be extremely challenging.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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3D Printer Hacked to Perform Fast and Cheap #DNA Sequencing #science #MSM #biology #neurology

3D Printer Hacked to Perform Fast and Cheap #DNA Sequencing #science #MSM #biology #neurology | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Scientists at AI Biosciences, a company out of College Station, Texas, modified a 3D printer to perform automated nucleic acid extraction and DNA amplifica
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#Physicists prepare to detect gravitational waves from neutron star collisions #astronomy #science

#Physicists prepare to detect gravitational waves from neutron star collisions #astronomy #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Last February, scientists made the groundbreaking discovery of gravitational waves produced by two colliding black holes. Now researchers are expecting to detect similar gravitational wave signals in the near future from collisions involving neutron stars—for example, the merging of two neutron stars to form a black hole, or the merging of a neutron star and a black hole.

 

In a new study published in Physical Review Letters, Aleksi Kurkela at CERN and the University of Stavanger in Norway and Aleksi Vuorinen at the University of Helsinki in Finland have developed an improved method of analyzing the ultradense matter called "quark matter" that is thought to exist in the cores of neutron stars. Their method makes theoretical predictions regarding the properties of neutron star matter that researchers working with the future data will hopefully be able to test.

 

So far, the best quantitative description of quark matter works only at a temperature of absolute zero. Although this zero-temperature approximation is adequate for describing dormant neutron stars, neutron star collisions would have such drastically higher temperatures that thermal corrections are essential.

 

In the new study, Kurkela and Vuorinen have accounted for high-temperature effects and incorporated them into the equation of state that describes quark matter, generalizing the equation to relatively small but non-zero temperatures. This modified framework provides a much more accurate description of quark matter that is valid in the hot conditions present in neutron star mergers.

 

As their name implies, neutron stars are made mostly of neutrons, and like all known matter, neutrons are made of quarks. Usually quarks are tightly bound together in groups of three, but the enormous density and pressure in the core of a neutron star is thought to break the structure of the neutrons, so that the quarks separate and form quark matter. Whereas atoms are the basic constituents of the atomic matter that we're familiar with, the basic constituents of quark matter are quarks, along with gluons that hold the quarks together.

 

Currently, quark matter is not very well understood, mainly because it does not exist naturally on Earth. Researchers can produce quark-gluon plasma at high-energy particle colliders, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), but it only exists for a fraction of a second before decaying because of the difficulty in maintaining the extreme conditions it requires.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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#education The #mystery of why you can't remember being a #baby #brain #neurology #science

#education The #mystery of why you can't remember being a #baby #brain #neurology #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Babies are sponges for new information – so why does it take so long for us to form your first memory? BBC Future investigates.
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Study shows #LSD’s effects on language and speech #BRAIN

Study shows #LSD’s effects on language and speech #BRAIN | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Study shows LSD’s effects on language and speech https://t.co/Bd7wlwYllN
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#Biologists are close to reinventing the genetic code of life #biology #gentech #science

#Biologists are close to reinventing the genetic code of life #biology #gentech #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

The term "life hacking" usually refers to clever tweaks that make your life more productive. But this week in Science, a team of scientists comes a step closer to the literal meaning: hacking the machinery of life itself. They have designed—though not completely assembled—a synthetic Escherichia coli genome that could use a protein-coding scheme different from the one employed by all known life. Requiring a staggering 62,000 DNA changes, the finished genome would be the most complicated genetic engineering feat so far. E. coli running this rewritten genome could become a new workhorse for laboratory experiments and a factory for new industrial chemicals, its creators predict.

 

Such a large-scale genomic hack once seemed impossible, but no longer, says Peter Carr, a bioengineer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington who is not involved with the project. "It's not easy, but we can engineer life at profound scales, even something as fundamental as the genetic code."

 

The genome hacking is underway in the lab of George Church at Harvard University, the DNA-sequencing pioneer who has become the most high-profile, and at times controversial, name in synthetic biology. The work takes advantage of the redundancy of life's genetic code, the language that DNA uses to instruct the cell's protein-synthesizing machinery. To produce proteins, cells "read" DNA's four-letter alphabet in clusters of three called codons. The 64 possible triplets are more than enough to encode the 20 amino acids that exist in nature, as well as the "stop" codons that mark the ends of genes. As a result, the genetic code has multiple codons for the same amino acid: the codons CCC and CCG both encode the amino acid proline, for example.

 

Church and others hypothesized that redundant codons could be eliminated—by swapping out every CCC for a CCG in every gene, for instance—without harming the cell. The gene that enables CCC to be translated into proline could then be deleted entirely. "There are a number of 'killer apps'" of such a "recoded" cell, says Farren Isaacs, a bioengineer at Yale University, who, with Church and colleagues, showed a stop codon can be swapped out entirely from E. coli.

 

The cells could be immune to viruses that impair bioreactors, for example, if crucial viral genes include now untranslatable codons. The changes could also allow synthetic biologists to repurpose the freed redundant codons for an entirely different function, such as coding for a new, synthetic amino acid.

 

For this study, Church's team decided to eliminate seven of the microbe's 64 codons. That target seemed like "a good balance" between the number of changes that appeared technically achievable and the number that might be too many for a cell to survive, says Matthieu Landon, one of Church's Ph.D. students. And the seven spare codons could eventually be repurposed to code up to four different unnatural amino acids.

 

But making so many changes, even with the latest DNA editing techniques such as CRISPR, still appeared impossible. Luckily, the cost of synthesizing DNA has plummeted over the past decade. So instead of editing the genome one site at a time, Church's team used machines to synthesize long stretches of the recoded genome from scratch, each chunk containing multiple changes.

 

The team has now turned to the laborious job of inserting these chunks into E. coli one by one and making sure that none of the genomic changes is lethal to the cells. The researchers have only tested 63% of the recoded genes so far, but remarkably few of the changes have caused trouble, they say.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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World's Smartest #Physicist Thinks #Science Can't Crack #Consciousness #miracle of non local #awareness

World's Smartest #Physicist Thinks #Science Can't Crack #Consciousness #miracle of non local #awareness | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
String theorist Edward Witten says consciousness “will remain a mystery”
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How to Dry Your Own #Herbs | Melissa K. Norris #permaculture #gardening

How to Dry Your Own #Herbs | Melissa K. Norris #permaculture #gardening | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
How to Dry Your Own Herbs | Melissa K. Norris https://t.co/k5JjRPy5El
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Are We Feeling Collective #Grief Over #Climate Change? #psychiatry #people #science #MSM

Are We Feeling Collective #Grief Over #Climate Change? #psychiatry #people #science #MSM | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
The idea is highly controversial, but at least one psychiatrist is convinced that we are, whether we know it or not

Via SustainOurEarth
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