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Scientific Proof of #Reincarnation: Dr. Ian Stevenson's Life Work | Humans Are Free

Scientific Proof of #Reincarnation: Dr. Ian Stevenson's Life Work | Humans Are Free | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
The following article can be seen as "Part Three" of my "Reincarnation is Fact"...
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Nature and the universe are a wonder. Insufficiently explored...
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Clean energy generated using #bacteria-powered #solar panel #renewables #science

Clean energy generated using #bacteria-powered #solar panel #renewables #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
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#tech 500,000+ devices have dangerous apps installed | #MobileSecurity #CyberSecurity #privacy #spying

#tech 500,000+ devices have dangerous apps installed | #MobileSecurity #CyberSecurity #privacy #spying | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Dead apps can be deadly

It’s not just apps live in app stores that represent a risk. Telemetry data collected by McAfee Labs shows that more than 500,000 devices still have dead apps installed and are actively used. With more than 2 million apps in each of the major app stores, malicious apps find ways through the store curators initial quality-control process.

In the past year, more than 4,000 apps were removed from Google Play, without notification to users. These users and the organisations they work for are still exposed to any vulnerabilities, privacy risks, or malware contained in these dead apps.

One recent example is a password stealer, distributed on Google Play as a variety of utilities and tools to acquire Instagram followers or analyse usage. The malware leads the user to a phishing website with a simple design that makes it difficult to distinguish between the legitimate and the fake, easily capturing users’ credentials.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/03/05/often-asked-questions-are-there-cyber-security-dangers-with-apps-and-whats-about-privacy/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/apps-for-any-use-mostly-for-education-and-free/?tag=Mobile+Security

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 28, 3:33 AM
Dead apps can be deadly

It’s not just apps live in app stores that represent a risk. Telemetry data collected by McAfee Labs shows that more than 500,000 devices still have dead apps installed and are actively used. With more than 2 million apps in each of the major app stores, malicious apps find ways through the store curators initial quality-control process.

In the past year, more than 4,000 apps were removed from Google Play, without notification to users. These users and the organisations they work for are still exposed to any vulnerabilities, privacy risks, or malware contained in these dead apps.

One recent example is a password stealer, distributed on Google Play as a variety of utilities and tools to acquire Instagram followers or analyse usage. The malware leads the user to a phishing website with a simple design that makes it difficult to distinguish between the legitimate and the fake, easily capturing users’ credentials.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/03/05/often-asked-questions-are-there-cyber-security-dangers-with-apps-and-whats-about-privacy/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/apps-for-any-use-mostly-for-education-and-free/?tag=Mobile+Security

 

MartinVermaak's comment, February 28, 9:18 AM
Call HP Tech Toll Free Number and Get Instant Services
http://dropshots.com/1-877-213-5868hpsupp/date/2017-02-28/04:30:51
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Anti-Aging #Gene Identified as a Novel Promising Therapeutic Target for Older Melanoma #Cancer Patients #DNA

Anti-Aging #Gene Identified as a Novel Promising Therapeutic Target for Older Melanoma #Cancer Patients #DNA | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Scientists at The Wistar Institute have shown that an anti-diabetic drug can inhibit the growth of melanoma in older patients by activating an anti-aging gene that in turn inhibits a protein involved in metastatic progression and resistance to targeted therapies for the disease. The study was published online in Clinical Cancer Research.


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New macOS #Patcher #Ransomware Locks Data for Good, No Way to Recover Your Files #Apple #tech

New macOS #Patcher #Ransomware Locks Data for Good, No Way to Recover Your Files #Apple #tech | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
A newly discovered ransomware family calling itself Patcher is targeting macOS users, but according to security researchers from ESET, who discovered the ransomware last week, Patcher bungles the encryption process and leaves affected users with no way of recovering their files.

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Roger Smith's curator insight, February 23, 12:04 AM

So MACOS can't get viruses eh, this may change your mind

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Why #AI could destroy more jobs than it creates, and how to save them #opinion

Why #AI could destroy more jobs than it creates, and how to save them #opinion | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Automation may be destroying jobs faster than it's creating new ones, but all hope isn't lost. TechRepublic spoke to MIT economist Erik Brynjolfsson on changing the course of the future.
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'Lossless' #metamaterial could boost efficiency of #lasers and other light-based devices #tech

'Lossless' #metamaterial could boost efficiency of #lasers and other light-based devices #tech | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a material that could reduce signal losses in photonic devices. The advance has the potential to boost the efficiency of various light-based technologies including fiber optic communication systems, lasers and photovoltaics.

 

The discovery addresses one of the biggest challenges in the field of photonics: minimizing loss of optical (light-based) signals in devices known as plasmonic metamaterials. Plasmonic metamaterials are materials engineered at the nanoscale to control light in unusual ways. They can be used to develop exotic devices ranging from invisibility cloaks to quantum computers. But a problem with metamaterials is that they typically contain metals that absorb energy from light and convert it into heat. As a result, part of the optical signal gets wasted, lowering the efficiency.

 

In a recent study published in Nature Communications, a team of photonics researchers led by electrical engineering professor Shaya Fainman at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering demonstrated a way to make up for these losses by incorporating into the metamaterial something that emits light—a semiconductor. "We're offsetting the loss introduced by the metal with gain from the semiconductor. This combination theoretically could result in zero net absorption of the signal—a 'lossless' metamaterial," said Joseph Smalley, an electrical engineering postdoctoral scholar in Fainman's group and the first author of the study.

 

In their experiments, the researchers shined light from an infrared laser onto the metamaterial. They found that depending on which way the light is polarized—which plane or direction (up and down, side to side) all the light waves are set to vibrate—the metamaterial either reflects or emits light.

 

"This is the first material that behaves simultaneously as a metal and a semiconductor. If light is polarized one way, the metamaterial reflects light like a metal, and when light is polarized the other way, the metamaterial absorbs and emits light of a different 'color' like a semiconductor," Smalley said.metamaterial-boost-efficiency-lasers.html#jCp


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Mariaschnee
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Early #brain development in infants at "high risk"  for #autism spectrum disorder So what? #LOL #Oneness #personality

Early #brain development in infants at "high risk"  for #autism spectrum disorder So what? #LOL #Oneness #personality | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Nature | doi:10.1038/nature21369
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Research: #Nature Plants Cure #Cancer, Not Chemicals

Research: #Nature Plants Cure #Cancer, Not Chemicals | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Unbeknownst to most, a Copernican revolution has already taken place in cancer theory. Today, the weight of evidence indicates that plants and not

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What happens to gene transcription during #DNA damage? #biology #chemistry #education

What happens to gene transcription during #DNA damage? #biology #chemistry #education | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

For the first time, scientists at the Francis Crick Institute have described what happens at the molecular level when gene transcription slows down in response to DNA damage in a cell.


Via Integrated DNA Technologies
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The incredible shrinking #computer chip, smarter, no longer smaller #Moore law

The incredible shrinking #computer chip, smarter, no longer smaller #Moore law | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Leibniz Institute have built a computer chip that receives, processes and transmits data at record speeds.

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3,000-year-old royal tomb discovered in #dictatorship #Egypt #history

3,000-year-old royal tomb discovered in #dictatorship #Egypt #history | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Archaeologists cleaning the forecourt of a high official’s tomb in Egypt poked through a hole and discovered another tomb behind it — one that was built for a man more than three millennia ago.
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#Scientists reveal how the #brain maintains useful #memories

#Scientists reveal how the #brain maintains useful #memories | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Researchers from the University of Toronto, Canada, have discovered a reason why we often struggle to remember the smaller details of past experiences.

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Mystery #radiation ‘clouds’ may pose risk to air travellers #spaceweather

Mystery #radiation ‘clouds’ may pose risk to air travellers #spaceweather | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Newly discovered aerial zones where radiation levels inexplicably spike could in future require flight diversions to avoid health risks

Via Ton Kraanen
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Chiral #superconductivity experimentally demonstrated for the first time #science #physics

Chiral #superconductivity experimentally demonstrated for the first time #science #physics | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Scientists have found that a superconducting current flows in only one direction through a chiral nanotube, marking the first observation of the effects of chirality on superconductivity. Until now, superconductivity has only been demonstrated in achiral materials, in which the current flows in both directions equally.

 

The team of researchers, F. Qin et al., from Japan, the US, and Israel, have published a paper on the first observation of chiral superconductivity in a recent issue of Nature Communications.

Chiral superconductivity combines two typically unrelated concepts in a single material: Chiral materials have mirror images that are not identical, similar to how left and right hands are not identical because they cannot be superimposed one on top of the other. And superconducting materials can conduct an electric current with zero resistance at very low temperatures.

 

Observing chiral superconductivity has been experimentally challenging due to the material requirements. Although carbon nanotubes are superconducting, chiral, and commonly available, so far researchers have only successfully demonstrated superconducting electron transport in nanotube assemblies and not in individual nanotubes, which are required for this purpose.

 

"The most important significance of our work is that superconductivity is realized in an individual nanotube for the first time," coauthor Toshiya Ideue at The University of Tokyo told Phys.org. "It enables us to search for exotic superconducting properties originating from the characteristic (tubular or chiral) structure."

 

The achievement is only possible with a new two-dimensional superconducting material called tungsten disulfide, a type of transition metal dichalcogenide, which is a new class of materials that have potential applications in electronics, photonics, and other areas. The tungsten disulfide nanotubes are superconducting at low temperatures using a method called ionic liquid gating and also have a chiral structure. In addition, it's possible to run a superconducting current through an individual tungsten disulfide nanotube.

 

When the researchers ran a current through one of these nanotubes and cooled the device down to 5.8 K, the current became superconducting—in this case, meaning its normal resistance dropped by half. When the researchers applied a magnetic field parallel to the nanotube, they observed small antisymmetric signals that travel in one direction only. These signals are negligibly small in nonchiral superconducting materials, and the researchers explain that the chiral structure is responsible for strongly enhancing these signals.

 

"The asymmetric electric transport is realized only when a magnetic field is applied parallel to the tube axis," Ideue said. "If there is no magnetic field, current should flow symmetrically. We note that electric current should be asymmetric (if the magnetic field is applied parallel to the tube axis) even in the normal state (non-superconducting region), but we could not see any discernible signals in the normal state yet, interestingly, it shows a large enhancement in the superconducting region."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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#Brain-computer interface advance allows paralyzed people to type almost as fast as some smartphone users #cyborg

#Brain-computer interface advance allows paralyzed people to type almost as fast as some smartphone users #cyborg | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Typing with your mind. You are paralyzed. But now, tiny electrodes have been surgically implanted in your brain to record signals from your motor cortex, the

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The #RNA code comes into focus #gentech #treeoflife

The #RNA code comes into focus #gentech #treeoflife | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

As researchers open up to the reality of RNA modification, an expanded epitranscriptomics toolbox takes shape.


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#NASA Telescope Reveals Record-Breaking #Exoplanet Discovery - 7 Earth-Like Planets

#NASA Telescope Reveals Record-Breaking #Exoplanet Discovery - 7 Earth-Like Planets | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed the first known system of seven Earth-size planets around a single star. Three of these planets are firmly located in the habitable zone, the area around the parent star where a rocky planet is most likely to have liquid water.

 

The discovery sets a new record for greatest number of habitable-zone planets found around a single star outside our solar system. All of these seven planets could have liquid water – key to life as we know it – under the right atmospheric conditions, but the chances are highest with the three in the habitable zone.

 

“This discovery could be a significant piece in the puzzle of finding habitable environments, places that are conducive to life,” said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator of the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. “Answering the question ‘are we alone’ is a top science priority and finding so many planets like these for the first time in the habitable zone is a remarkable step forward toward that goal.”

 

At about 40 light-years (235 trillion miles) from Earth, the system of planets is relatively close to us, in the constellation Aquarius. Because they are located outside of our solar system, these planets are scientifically known as exoplanets.

 

This exoplanet system is called TRAPPIST-1, named for The Transiting Planets and Planetesimals Small Telescope (TRAPPIST) in Chile. In May 2016, researchers using TRAPPIST announced they had discovered three planets in the system. Assisted by several ground-based telescopes, including the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope, Spitzer confirmed the existence of two of these planets and discovered five additional ones, increasing the number of known planets in the system to seven.

 

The new results were published Wednesday in the journal Nature, and announced at a news briefing at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

 

Using Spitzer data, the team precisely measured the sizes of the seven planets and developed first estimates of the masses of six of them, allowing their density to be estimated.

 

Based on their densities, all of the TRAPPIST-1 planets are likely to be rocky. Further observations will not only help determine whether they are rich in water, but also possibly reveal whether any could have liquid water on their surfaces. The mass of the seventh and farthest exoplanet has not yet been estimated – scientists believe it could be an icy, "snowball-like" world, but further observations are needed.

 

"The seven wonders of TRAPPIST-1 are the first Earth-size planets that have been found orbiting this kind of star," said Michael Gillon, lead author of the paper and the principal investigator of the TRAPPIST exoplanet survey at the University of Liege, Belgium. "It is also the best target yet for studying the atmospheres of potentially habitable, Earth-size worlds."

 

 

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Loreto Vargas's curator insight, February 24, 12:50 PM
Good news!! I am waiting for the first voyage to Darkover!!
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The rise of #AI and #robotics #automation #unemployment #skynet #tech #students #Nuitdebout #PvdD

The rise of #AI and #robotics #automation #unemployment #skynet #tech #students #Nuitdebout #PvdD | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Fears of a 'robot revolution' have been exaggerated, says Jannie Strydom, CEO at LarcAI
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#Hacking Exposed NextGen #Windows10 can be hacked throught #bios #UEFI #ransomware #tech #ICT #security

#Hacking Exposed NextGen #Windows10 can be hacked throught #bios #UEFI #ransomware #tech #ICT #security | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
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#DNA computer brings ‘intelligent drugs’ a step closer #transhuman #future #chemborg #tech #biology

#DNA computer brings ‘intelligent drugs’ a step closer #transhuman #future #chemborg #tech #biology | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

A new method that should enable controlled drug delivery into the bloodstream using DNA computers is an important step towards 'intelligent' medicine.


Via Integrated DNA Technologies
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Machine learning could finally crack the 4,000-year-old Indus script #computer #tech #science #students #history

Machine learning could finally crack the 4,000-year-old Indus script #computer #tech #science #students #history | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
After a century of failing to crack an ancient script, linguists turn to machines
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Even tiny #bumblebee brains can solve complex problems and teach others #spirit #biology #science

Even tiny #bumblebee brains can solve complex problems and teach others #spirit #biology #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Lars Chittka didn’t expect much when he decided to see if bumblebees could learn to pull a string for a reward. While animals from birds to apes can solve this puzzle, it seemed unlikely that bees could solve it too because they have such tiny brains. “I asked what may have seemed an entirely mad question,” says Chittka, a behavioral ecologist at Queen Mary University of London.

 

But it turned out not be mad in the slightest. In new research reported in PLOS Biology, Chittka and his colleagues got a “big surprise”: they found that bumblebees could easily be trained to pull strings for sugar water.

 

First the researchers attached strings to blue discs with sugar water in the middle, and then let the bees learn that these fake flowers held a reward. The next step was putting the flowers under plexiglass – only the very tips of the strings were within reach. This was the first test of string pulling in an insect.

 

With this training, more than half of the bees solved the puzzle, vigorously pulling the string toward them until they could drink the sweet reward in the flower. Another experiment showed that while untrained bees rarely learned this skill on their own, a few actually did. “This was even more of a surprise,” Chittka says.

 

The researchers also found that this new skill spread socially and culturally from bee to bee. After watching trained bees demonstrate their string-pulling prowess, 60 percent of untrained bees solved the problem on their own. And adding a single trained bee to a colony of untrained bees was enough for many of them to acquire the skill.

 

“This was the final surprise – there is still a common perception that humans, and especially the cultural processes seen in humans, are unique in their cognitive performances,” Chittka says. “It’s tempting to assume that a large brain is a prerequisite for such phenomena.” But, as his work shows, problem solving and cultural transmission don’t necessarily take much brainpower.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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#Science - Scientists calculate signal of gravitational wave sources #physics

#Science - Scientists calculate signal of gravitational wave sources #physics | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Theoretical physicists from the University of Basel calculated signals from a long-lost cosmological phenomena known as ‘oscillons, ’ gravitational wave sources from just after the Big Bang. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4212778/Scientists-calculate-signal-gravitational-wave-sources.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490
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Aerial Photos of Iceland That Look Like Abstract Paintings #Iceland

Aerial Photos of Iceland That Look Like Abstract Paintings #Iceland | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

"Andre Ermolaev is a Russian photographer who takes incredible aerial and landscape photographs. In his series entitled Iceland. River., Andre shows us the beautiful environment of Iceland from above.

The rivers and streams shown, which are carrying sediment from volcanoes and glaciers give the photos the incredible colours and textures. The photographs could easily be mistaken for abstract landscape paintings."


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The day the #Pintupi Nine entered the modern world - BBC News

The day the #Pintupi Nine entered the modern world - BBC News | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
In 1984 a group of Australian Aboriginal people living a traditional nomadic life were found deep in the heart of the Gibson desert.
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#Windows Trojan hacks into embedded devices to install Mirai | #CyberSecurity #Botnets #IoT #Awareness #tech

#Windows Trojan hacks into embedded devices to install Mirai | #CyberSecurity #Botnets #IoT #Awareness #tech | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
The Trojan tries to authenticate over different protocols with factory default credentials and, if successful, deploys the Mirai bot.

 

Attackers have started to use Windows and Android malware to hack into embedded devices, dispelling the widely held belief that if such devices are not directly exposed to the Internet they're less vulnerable.

 

This new Trojan found by Doctor Web, dubbed Trojan.Mirai.1, shows that attackers can also use compromised computers to target IoT devices that are not directly accessible from the internet.

 

Infected smartphones can be used in a similar way. Researchers from Kaspersky Lab have already found an Android app designed to perform brute-force password guessing attacks against routers over the local network.

 

 


Via Gust MEES
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