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Most powerful magnetic field in universe that is 40 trillion times stronger than Earth's

Most powerful magnetic field in universe that is 40 trillion times stronger than Earth's | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
The strongest magnetic field in the universe has potentially been discovered – a dead star that packs the equivalent mass of our sun into an area just 12 miles across.

 

The former star, which has the catchy name SGR 0418+5729, is 6,500 light years from Earth and was initially thought to have an unusually low magnetic field. New observations using the European Space Agency’s XMM Newton Space Telescope have, however, revealed that it may be the strongest magnetic source in the known universe.

 

Astronomers calculated that SGR 0418 must have a magnetic field of more than 1 quadrillion, or 1,000 trillion, gauss, the unit used to measure the strength of a magnetic field. By comparison, the iron core of the Earth is thought to have a magnetic field of 25 gauss.

 

Physicists have estimated that the upper limit for a magnetar would be 100 quadrillion gauss, but none have been found to be this powerful yet.

 

“To explain our observations, this magnetar must have a super-strong, twisted magnetic field reaching 10E15 Gauss across small regions on the surface, spanning only a few hundred meters across,” said Dr Tiengo.

 

“On average, the field can appear fairly weak, as earlier results have suggested. But we are now able to probe substructure on the surface and see that the field is very strong locally.”

 

The researchers, whose findings are published in the journal Nature, now hope the new technique may help them discover other hidden magnetars and may help reveal more about those that have already been identified.

 

Norbert Schartel, ESA’s XMM-Newton project scientist, said: “The spectral data provided by XMM-Newton, combined with a new way of analysing the data, allowed us to finally make the first detailed measurements of the magnetic field of a magnetar, confirming it as one of the largest values ever measured in the universe."

 

“We now have a new tool to probe the magnetic fields of other magnetars, which will help constrain models of these exotic objects.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, CineversityTV
CineversityTV's insight:

till now

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CineversityTV's curator insight, August 19, 2013 1:14 PM

till now.

Peter Phillips's curator insight, August 19, 2013 5:58 PM

Science geek food - pure. Waiting to hear more about this one.

Limitless learning Universe
Nature and the universe are a wonder. Insufficiently explored...
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Clean energy generated using #bacteria-powered #solar panel #renewables #science

Clean energy generated using #bacteria-powered #solar panel #renewables #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
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The incredible shrinking #computer chip, smarter, no longer smaller #Moore law

The incredible shrinking #computer chip, smarter, no longer smaller #Moore law | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Leibniz Institute have built a computer chip that receives, processes and transmits data at record speeds.

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3,000-year-old royal tomb discovered in #dictatorship #Egypt #history

3,000-year-old royal tomb discovered in #dictatorship #Egypt #history | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Archaeologists cleaning the forecourt of a high official’s tomb in Egypt poked through a hole and discovered another tomb behind it — one that was built for a man more than three millennia ago.
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#Scientists reveal how the #brain maintains useful #memories

#Scientists reveal how the #brain maintains useful #memories | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Researchers from the University of Toronto, Canada, have discovered a reason why we often struggle to remember the smaller details of past experiences.

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Mystery #radiation ‘clouds’ may pose risk to air travellers #spaceweather

Mystery #radiation ‘clouds’ may pose risk to air travellers #spaceweather | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Newly discovered aerial zones where radiation levels inexplicably spike could in future require flight diversions to avoid health risks

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We finally have a #computer that can survive the surface of #Venus #astronomy #physics #science

We finally have a #computer that can survive the surface of #Venus #astronomy #physics #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Sulphuric rain is easy; not being cremated by 500°C or crushed by 90 atmospheres is hard.
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Understanding Agent Cooperation | #DeepMind #AI the first step towards #matrix #Skynet #students #MSM

Understanding Agent Cooperation | #DeepMind #AI the first step towards #matrix #Skynet #students #MSM | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
We employ deep multi-agent reinforcement learning to model the emergence of cooperation. The new notion of sequential social dilemmas allows us to model how rational agents interact, and arrive at more or less cooperative behaviours depending on the nature of the environment and the agents’ cognitive capacity.
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Son of #Stuxnet: "invisible," memory-resident #malware stalks the world's banks #tech #hacking

Son of #Stuxnet: "invisible," memory-resident #malware stalks the world's banks #tech #hacking | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Duqu 2.0 is a strain of clever, nearly undetectable malware, derived from Stuxnet, that stays resident in its hosts’ memory without ever writing persistent files to the system’s drives.

Via Roger Smith
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Roger Smith's curator insight, February 8, 3:51 PM

This is something that we have been working on in the range.  Delivering undetectable malware through powershell and how to counteract it.


Facinating stuff, that could be the next wave of cyber attacks.  


 


Want to know more then contact me


 


 

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#DNA “Barcoding” Allows Rapid Testing of #Nanoparticles for Therapeutic Delivery

#DNA “Barcoding” Allows Rapid Testing of #Nanoparticles for Therapeutic Delivery | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Using tiny snippets of DNA as “barcodes,” researchers have developed a new technique for rapidly screening the ability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to specific organs of the body. The technique could accelerate the development and use of gene therapies for such killers as heart disease, cancer and Parkinson’s disease.


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Immune therapy #scientists discover distinct cells that block #cancer-fighting immune cells

Immune therapy #scientists discover distinct cells that block #cancer-fighting immune cells | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Princess Margaret Cancer Centre scientists have discovered a distinct cell population in tumours that inhibits the body's immune response to fight cancer.

Via Krishan Maggon
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Could magical #mushrooms contain the cure for depression?

Could magical #mushrooms contain the cure for depression? | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Mental health issues, and depression in particular, have risen to alarming proportions in recent years. The CDC reports that at any given time, 7.6 percent of people in the U.S. over the age of 12 are afflicted with this condition.

As the CDC further notes, depression is associated with an increa
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#Black #History Month: Remembering Mary #Turner and the ‘ #Holocaust of Lynchings’ #racism

#Black #History Month: Remembering Mary #Turner and the ‘ #Holocaust of Lynchings’ #racism | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
To begin to change the course of history, it is imperative to engage with a collective, yet fragmented and widely ignored, dark past.
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#FF #Brain synapses grow during the day and shrink by 20% during sleep, helping reset neurons, two new #Science

#FF #Brain synapses grow during the day and shrink by 20% during sleep, helping reset neurons, two new #Science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
reddit: the front page of the internet
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Even tiny #bumblebee brains can solve complex problems and teach others #spirit #biology #science

Even tiny #bumblebee brains can solve complex problems and teach others #spirit #biology #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Lars Chittka didn’t expect much when he decided to see if bumblebees could learn to pull a string for a reward. While animals from birds to apes can solve this puzzle, it seemed unlikely that bees could solve it too because they have such tiny brains. “I asked what may have seemed an entirely mad question,” says Chittka, a behavioral ecologist at Queen Mary University of London.

 

But it turned out not be mad in the slightest. In new research reported in PLOS Biology, Chittka and his colleagues got a “big surprise”: they found that bumblebees could easily be trained to pull strings for sugar water.

 

First the researchers attached strings to blue discs with sugar water in the middle, and then let the bees learn that these fake flowers held a reward. The next step was putting the flowers under plexiglass – only the very tips of the strings were within reach. This was the first test of string pulling in an insect.

 

With this training, more than half of the bees solved the puzzle, vigorously pulling the string toward them until they could drink the sweet reward in the flower. Another experiment showed that while untrained bees rarely learned this skill on their own, a few actually did. “This was even more of a surprise,” Chittka says.

 

The researchers also found that this new skill spread socially and culturally from bee to bee. After watching trained bees demonstrate their string-pulling prowess, 60 percent of untrained bees solved the problem on their own. And adding a single trained bee to a colony of untrained bees was enough for many of them to acquire the skill.

 

“This was the final surprise – there is still a common perception that humans, and especially the cultural processes seen in humans, are unique in their cognitive performances,” Chittka says. “It’s tempting to assume that a large brain is a prerequisite for such phenomena.” But, as his work shows, problem solving and cultural transmission don’t necessarily take much brainpower.


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#Science - Scientists calculate signal of gravitational wave sources #physics

#Science - Scientists calculate signal of gravitational wave sources #physics | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Theoretical physicists from the University of Basel calculated signals from a long-lost cosmological phenomena known as ‘oscillons, ’ gravitational wave sources from just after the Big Bang. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4212778/Scientists-calculate-signal-gravitational-wave-sources.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490
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Aerial Photos of Iceland That Look Like Abstract Paintings #Iceland

Aerial Photos of Iceland That Look Like Abstract Paintings #Iceland | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

"Andre Ermolaev is a Russian photographer who takes incredible aerial and landscape photographs. In his series entitled Iceland. River., Andre shows us the beautiful environment of Iceland from above.

The rivers and streams shown, which are carrying sediment from volcanoes and glaciers give the photos the incredible colours and textures. The photographs could easily be mistaken for abstract landscape paintings."


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The day the #Pintupi Nine entered the modern world - BBC News

The day the #Pintupi Nine entered the modern world - BBC News | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
In 1984 a group of Australian Aboriginal people living a traditional nomadic life were found deep in the heart of the Gibson desert.
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#Windows Trojan hacks into embedded devices to install Mirai | #CyberSecurity #Botnets #IoT #Awareness #tech

#Windows Trojan hacks into embedded devices to install Mirai | #CyberSecurity #Botnets #IoT #Awareness #tech | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
The Trojan tries to authenticate over different protocols with factory default credentials and, if successful, deploys the Mirai bot.

 

Attackers have started to use Windows and Android malware to hack into embedded devices, dispelling the widely held belief that if such devices are not directly exposed to the Internet they're less vulnerable.

 

This new Trojan found by Doctor Web, dubbed Trojan.Mirai.1, shows that attackers can also use compromised computers to target IoT devices that are not directly accessible from the internet.

 

Infected smartphones can be used in a similar way. Researchers from Kaspersky Lab have already found an Android app designed to perform brute-force password guessing attacks against routers over the local network.

 

 


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A Danish #astronaut has captured the best-ever images of rare blue flashes

A Danish #astronaut has captured the best-ever images of rare blue flashes | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
These transient features are so named because they last about 20 milliseconds.

 

Scientists don't know much about the mysterious, powerful electric discharges that sometimes occur in the upper levels of the atmosphere in conjunction with thunderstorms. The first photograph of the phenomenon—which can occur as high as about 90km above the surface of the Earth and are known variously as sprites, pixies, elves, or jets—was only taken from Earth in 1989.

 

Fortunately for scientists interested in these storms, the International Space Station offers an excellent vantage point at an altitude of about 400km. So Danish researchers devised a "Thor experiment"—named after the hammer-wielding Norse god—to study the phenomenon. As part of the experiment, an astronaut on board the station would image thunderstorms under certain conditions, and these observations would be correlated with data collected by satellites and ground-based radar and lightning detection systems.

 

It may sound easy to catch a few quick snaps of electrical storms, but given the station's movement at 28,000km/hour and ephemeral nature of these events, it's actually quite difficult. Sprites and other features got their other-worldly names precisely because they are so short-lived, lasting on the order of 20 milliseconds.

 

When Danish astronaut Andreas Mogensen spent 10 days on the station in September 2015 as part of an ESA-Roscosmos contract that designated him a visiting crew member, one of his primary tasks was to complete the Thor experiment. Perched in the station's cupola, with a Nikon D4 set at 6400 ISO and recording 24 frames per second, Mogensen readied himself to capture images at locations where forecasters predicted thunderstorm activity would occur below.

 


 

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Z Machine - Can We Make A Star? #physics #science #renewables

Professor Brian Cox visits The Z Machine, the world's most powerful laboratory radiation source as it prepares to fire up. Taken from Can We Make A Star
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Total recall: the people who never forget #HSAM #neurobiology #science

Total recall: the people who never forget #HSAM #neurobiology #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
The Long Read: An extremely rare condition may transform our understanding of memory

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Hundreds of #ancient earthworks built in the #Amazon 1500 to 2300 years ago #history

Hundreds of #ancient earthworks built in the #Amazon 1500 to 2300 years ago #history | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
The Amazonian rainforest was transformed over two thousand years ago by ancient people who built hundreds of large, mysterious earthworks.
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Electromagnetic Levitation #Quadcopter #tech #physics #science #education

Spinning magnets near copper sheets create levitation! Try Audible free for 30 days: http://bit.ly/AudibleVe Special thanks to Hyperloop One for showing m
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Jay #Forrester: the man who saw the future

Jay #Forrester: the man who saw the future | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Jay Forrester, one of the great minds of the 20th century, died at 98, a few days ago. His career was long and fruitful, and we can say that his work changed the intellectual story of humankind in various ways, in particular for the role he had in the birth of the Club of Rome's report "The Limits to Growth"


Via Bernard Ryefield
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No ink required: paper can be printed with light #news #science #school #university #book

No ink required: paper can be printed with light #news #science #school #university #book | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
In an effort to curb the adverse environmental impacts of paper production, researchers in a new study have developed a light-printable paper—paper that can be printed with UV light, erased by heating to 120 °C (250 °F), and rewritten more than 80 times. The secret to printing with light lies in the color-changing chemistry of nanoparticles, a thin coating of which can be easily applied to conventional paper to transform it into the light-printable version.

The researchers, Wenshou Wang and coauthors at Shandong University in China; the University of California, Riverside; and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, have published a paper on the light-printable rewritable paper in a recent issue of Nano Letters.

Via Mariaschnee
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