The web is not a desktop
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The web is not a desktop
Everything on creating an accessible experience for all (mobile, a11y, TV, etc) (mainly english, some dutch)
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Behold, the Fold

Behold, the Fold | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it
If you’re in the web industry and reading this article, you’re probably thinking, “Over halfway through 2014 and she’s writing about the fold on the web! I thought we settled this!” But, the existence of the fold is still something that gets debated on many of our projects. Below is an imagined conversation between myself and a Defender of The Fold, in which I successfully explain why we shouldn’t worry about the fold on the web.
sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

Quite entertaining example of how to tell those pesky 'folders' what's what. Have had similar conversations many times, even recently, so this stays relevant, even though we can never be sure where this 'fold' will end up on all our users' varying screen sizes...

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Data from wearables tells a story: this is how we move - VINT

Data from wearables tells a story: this is how we move - VINT | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it
DATA FROM WEARABLES TELLS A STORY: THIS IS HOW WE MOVE
sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

The kinds of data wearable motion trackers collect, as shown in this video from Human.cc, could be very valuable in city planning efforts. #beyondpersonal #bigdata

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Google And Berg Team Up To Create An Internet Of Things

Google And Berg Team Up To Create An Internet Of Things | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it

Google is ridiculously powerful. The service isn’t just search. It isn’t just maps. It isn’t just your email or spreadsheets.

 

So in 2011, Google Creative Lab approached Berg with a question: “If Google wasn’t trapped behind glass, what would it do?” The answer to that question consumed the entire studio for months. Ultimately, their answer was that computer vision--think technologies like Kinect--would meld with 3-D projection--think uber VJing--to become a sort of material of its very own.

sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

Awesome experiments with AR building a true internet of things, by using a learning smart lamp to bring otherwise 'dumb' objects to life. Really shows us that there's more to the internet than websites and apps. Wonder when and if any comsumer application of this technique would ever be feasible, but I see some good use cases of this kind of stuff for prototyping and conceptual sketching brought to life in prodcut development.

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13 Design Trends For 2013 - The Industry

13 Design Trends For 2013 - The Industry | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it
4. “Hamburger” Menu Drawer

Plenty of apps already use this as the icon choice for menus, but I think it’s going to become much more universal. It’s a simple way to show that there’s a list of options and it can be done with nothing more than three parallel lines.

 

One application does add a bit of fun to this, though. In Marco Arment’s The Magazine, if you hold the button for around three seconds, the hamburger menu button sincerely turns into a hamburger. A delicious easter egg from one of the best in the business.


Although not so much of a trend, per se, it’s a visual representation that will more than likely become universal, more so than it already is.

sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

All in all this whole selection of trends is quite nice, however the 'Hamburger menu really stands out for me. Here's why...

 

This 'hamburger icon' is named for being a stack of three horizontal lines, like a hamburger (bun/meat/bun). Apart from the name being pretty confusing, since a 'Hamburger Menu' does not make one's mind spring to web design immediately, there's another catch. 

 

The icon is often used in Mobile applications, to indicate a fold out menu of sorts (slide-off like in the Facebook app, or dropdown in the wordpress standard mobile template). However, in Google's account settings, it is also used in selecting the preferred language. There's a stack of bars, one for primary language, and then one or more for secondary languages. These bars then each contain a 'hamburger' icon, which you can use to select other languages. So here, it is still somewhat of a menu, but the meaning and interaction is completely different, since here the hamburger is an indication of a simple select-box dropdown, only styled completely different. To Google's defense, it works pretty nicely on my desktop browser. It pops up a multi-column list of languages you can select from, which allows them to display all languages in one go. But it did mess up my flow.

 

Anyway, what do you think is the affordance of the hamburger icon? Have you even ever noticed it consciously? Is it a fad, or here to stay? I'd love to read your input.

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The #IBM5in5 - Five senses to be augmented in the near future?

The #IBM5in5 - Five senses to be augmented in the near future? | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it
IBM presents The 5 in 5 in five sensory categories, through innovations that will touch our lives and see us into the future. #IBM5in5
sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

IBM predicts that in the next five years, technology will be available to enhance and augment our senses, from the obvious 'vision' which is already here with some AR applications, to the less obvious senses like 'hearing' and  'taste'.

 

I personally think the practical applications of technology-aided smell could be very useful, like we already have carbonmonoxide sniffing alarms, this could be extended to all other sorts of diagnostics and alerts.

 

What do you think?

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The top 20 web conference talks of 2012 | .net magazine > topic winner: responsive

The top 20 web conference talks of 2012 | .net magazine > topic winner: responsive | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it
2012 in review: we asked web designers and developers from both sides of the Atlantic to recommend their favourite talks and presentations from the last 12 months. Here's what they've come up with
sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

Just in time for your holiday viewing pleasure, .net magazine rounds up its top 20 web conference talks, including some of the most inspiring and useful insights from a year of awesomeness. Featured talks include Stephen Hay at Mobilism and Jason Grigsby's Immobile Web, as well as a host of other excellent talks. The main takeaway from the list is that 'Responsive' was quite the issue on conferences throughout the year. 

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Vexing Viewports

Vexing Viewports | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it

"Apple’s newest tablet, the iPad Mini, creates a vexing situation: Itsdevice-width viewport tag defaults to the same values as Apple’s original iPad (768x1024 pixels), even though the Mini's screen is physically 40 percent smaller. That means every button, graphic, link, and line of text on a web page on the iPad Mini appears tiny—even when we try to do the right thing and build flexible, multi-device experiences."

sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

This article rose the frustration after the introduction of the iPad mini, which is for all intents and purposes indistinguisable programmatically from an iPad2. The authors describe the troubles with viewport size, pixel-density and other hurdles on the path to presenting an end-user with the best experience possible, which also includes for designers and developers letting go of pixel precision.

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The Making of Fastbook: An HTML5 Love Story by @Sencha

The Making of Fastbook: An HTML5 Love Story by @Sencha | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it
When we started what became Sencha, we made a bet on the web: a bet that modern application development didn't need anything except the browser, a great set of frameworks and a great set of tools. ...

So, when Mark Zuckerberg said HTML5 wasn't ready, we took a little offense to the comment.

We thought to ourselves: HTML5 can't really be the reason that Facebook's mobile application was slow. We knew what the browser on modern smart phones was capable of and what kind of rich capabilities HTML5 offered. ...

So we took it upon ourselves to rebuild the challenging parts of the Facebook mobile application in HTML5 in our spare time. Today, we'd like to introduce you to Sencha Fastbook, a technology proof of concept that shows how fast HTML5 can be, and demonstrates how readily HTML5 can be used to handle the toughest app challenges.
sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

The developers at @sencha were quite offended by Mark Zuckerberg's comments about HTML5 not being ready. So they took to the task to rebuilding the most challenging parts of the new facebook native apps with HTML5. And even improving on many points. Check out the side by side comparison of the iOS and Android native apps and the 'Fastbook' web app concept. Try it for yourself with a modern smartphone at http://fb.html5isready.com/ ;

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Responsify everything - Why not make your URLs responsive? - an idea by @chrisrowe

Why not make your URLs responsive?
sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

Awesome idea to also responsify the url's to fit the smaller address bar in smaller browser windows. 

Good idea to make you stop and think about responsive past the hype.

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24 ways: Responsive Responsive Design by @tkadlec

24 ways: Responsive Responsive Design by @tkadlec | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it
sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

A plea on keeping responsive designs responsive. Or, to implement responsive designs responsibly.

 

A responsible developer translates the beautiful and smart designs made by visual and ux designers to an actual product that is in fact, still usable.

 

All too often in interactions and visual design the aspects that are different for mobile or desknot-users are taken into account extensively, but in the actual development phase, not a single thought is spent on the impact on the technical aspects, such as performance.

 

Tim details some really practical tips, like being careful with images (burned myself on that one recently) and including certain JavaScript frameworks by default (also see 'day 7: Think first code later' for more on that)

 

So, be a responsible developer and keep your responsive web projects responding well in all contexts, so you users experience a truly responsive and usable app or website.

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Forrester on mobile marketing: target the right customers

Forrester on mobile marketing: target the right customers | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it

New Forrester report that Venturebeat summarizes some conclusions out of.

 

The report considers adult American phone owners, and segments them into categories, with growing rates of interactivity and usage, ranging from Talkers (strictly using phones to, er, phone - 25%) to SuperConnecteds (Access mobile internet at least weekly - 48%).


So guess who Forrester recommends to target in your mobile campaigns? 

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Mary Meeker releases stunning data on the state of the Internet

Mary Meeker releases stunning data on the state of the Internet | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it
sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

Mary Meeker's huge, well-researched slideshows are a treasure trove of data on the state of the Internet. Here's her latest, with highlights called out by VentureBeat.

 

The takeaways by venturebeat are good highlights, obviously about social web, mobile web and other essential trends, but the entire slideshare deck is really worth looking into as well.

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Microsoft's So.cl is more like pinterest than facebook

Microsoft's So.cl is more like pinterest than facebook | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it

 

sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

Microsoft's So.cl is more like pinterest than facebook. With a tagline that says "you can create your own collage in seconds" and a facebook enabled login, it looks like it won't be competing the exisiting social networks where Facebook & Google+ are in the lead. But also in the realm of collageing where Pinterest reigns supreme, it is unsure what the added value of this Microsoft initiative is or aspires to be.

 

The stranges thing though, is the lack of mobile presence. No mobile or responsive site, no apps that I can find. It seems like another botched social effort. Fail or fun, what do you think?

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SMACT slide by @BLO2M

SMACT slide by @BLO2M | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it
SLIDE: The disruptive SMACT platform builds up from 2004-2020 with exponential impact @IEEEIoT @IBMSmartCities pic.twitter.com/FaebEbFQqO
sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

#SMAC is the beginning. Where it gets interesting is where the T gets added. #SMACT will add the pervasiveness with new & unimagined touchpoints & data collection.

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Why Banner Carousels Just Don’t Work.

Why Banner Carousels Just Don’t Work. | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it

”There’s a nice carousel banner in company x’s website. I’d like to have that too!” No you don’t. At least if you really care about conversions."

sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

Great round up by @ilkkakoivisto of research done on the conversion of banner carrousels.

 

How many times have you actually seen all the 4/5 different messages that are in the carrousel before moving past the front page?  

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Why Everyone Suddenly Loves The Phablet

Why Everyone Suddenly Loves The Phablet | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it
Big screens equal big bucks. That's what Samsung realized with its first--and still quite popular--Galaxy Note mobile device, which was a whopping 5.3-inch screen pseudo-tablet that only folks like Andre The Giant (and perhaps certain members of...
sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

The Phablet made a splash at CES. Or it attempted to, anyway. I'm still on the Apple side of things, I don't value the added screen estate enough to outweigh the pocketability of these devices. Although there are some very light devices out there, when I feel it becomes hard to shove in my fron trouser pocket, that's the limit for me. Mind you, I don't even wear skinny jeans. 

 

For web designers and developers the possible endless range of screen sizes and more importantly resolutions means we've had to learn to let go of the notion of dektop vs mobile. There is now not simply a border where the divide can be identified between desktop, tablet and smartphone resolutions.  This could make a case for truly responsive designs. At any rate it means that you have to make sure not to make bold assumptions and as a result create an unusable website. 

 

Interesting times, now the phone/tablet and tablet/desktop gaps are being closed.

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6 Web Design Trends That (I Hope) Will Disappear in 2013 by @tim_ash

6 Web Design Trends That (I Hope) Will Disappear in 2013 by @tim_ash | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it
Overcomplicated design? Too many pop-overs? A never-ending form? Resolve to make your website a better experience for your customers this year.
sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

These six design trends should also be kept in mind for the desknot category (mobile, tablet, screen reader, TV, future devices?).

 

1 Overcomplicated design

Especially when designing for broad adaptability/accessibility. Keeping it simple is the best guarantee to create broad device/browser support and stay future proof.

 

2 Home page rotating banner

On smaller screens this is almost impossible to create without pushing ALL other content off the screen. Most of the solutions in the wild also have some difiiculties with touch interactions, because they're really all designed with desktop browsers in mind.

 

3 Stock Photoritis

This has nothing to do whatsoever with devices or accessibility, but having a meaningful and real image does make it a _lot_ easier to write a good alt text, which does help a lot for your accessibility score.

 

4 Pop-overs and other interruptions

Popups on mobile devices? Or screen readers? You do the math. Not only is it bothersome to be interrupted unexpectedly, I've experienced some downright impossible implementations when trying to get rid of said pop-overs on my mobile. Never actually got to read _that_ article. Score one for the marketing team!

 

5 Premature CTA

When prioritizing which content is most important, the CTA can seem rather high ranking on the list, but especially in the desknot arena, giving the actual content enough breathing room is rather important. And again, being too pushy is not good for conversion (personal experience there, if you ever tried to buy a new kitchen or a second hand car).

 

6 Excessive form fields

Again, brevity is your friend. Go for the minimum of strictly _neccessary_ information, once a customer is engaged, then you can try to pry loose more. Don't scare away interested customers with too many hurdles. Yes, every single form field is a hurlde.

 

So, the main recurring takeaways are:

prioritize content wisely,

keep it simple &

be authentic.

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Responsive and Parallax: Two Web Design Trends to Look Out For in 2013

Responsive and Parallax: Two Web Design Trends to Look Out For in 2013 | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it
With new technologies and coding styles becoming available, two new styles of design that are going to become more common in 2013 are responsive design and parallax design.
sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

Nice short overview of two design tools for websites, and examples of both in the wild. 

 

Just to be a smartypants, I'd like to add that 'Parallax' means more than simply scrolling website, but actually refers to the effect of scrolling the foreground and background (or more layers) at different speeds, thus creating a depth effect. 

 

As noted, each of these approaches is not for everyone, but if you're working on a new website, you should definitely consider them.

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HTML_CodeSniffer: an essential #accessibility bookmarklet by @htmlcs

HTML_CodeSniffer: an essential #accessibility bookmarklet by @htmlcs | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it
Check that your HTML code conforms to your coding standard

HTML_CodeSniffer is a client-side script that checks HTML source code and detects violations of a defined coding standard. HTML_CodeSniffer is written entirely in JavaScript, does not require any server-side processing and can be extended by developers to enforce custom coding standards by creating your own "sniffs".

To get you started, HTML_CodeSniffer comes with a set of 3 standards that enforce the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0. An auditor interface is provided by a bookmarklet to let you try out the WCAG 2.0 checks on any web page.

sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

Awesome tool to run a quick check of the accessibility (and standards compliance) of your website, giving concrete tips on what you need to improve. Essential!

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10 Mobile Web Design Best Practices on @GetElastic

10 Mobile Web Design Best Practices on @GetElastic | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it
Go to full site – the mobile website escape

Always include a link to the full site for your users. No matter how good your design, some people just want the experience they’re used to. The only thing that likes change is a wet baby.

Pop-ups suck on mobile

Window management on mobile still sucks. YouTube, Maps, anything that opens native applications takes the user outside the website’s flow and out of context. Do your best to integrate these elements on the page so that users can stay with the website they’re viewing.

Give your mobile website a mobile-first makeover

Going mobile is about more than just squeezing an existing website into a one-column format. Examine your analytics and your user feedback. Tackle the opportunity to re-imagine your website for mobile and to focus on the important elements. Reorganize content so that it makes sense to the user. Drop extra content blocks. Move elements up or down the page. Add new elements for mobile devices. It’s your site to make amazing.
sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

Good advice on what not to forget when mobilizing your existing site design. My tip top 3 included here, click through for all ten tips.

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The Future Of Mobile according to Henry Blodget

The Future Of Mobile according to Henry Blodget | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it
The growth of the digital industry over the next few years will continue to be all about mobile.Last year, the number of smartphones sold blew past the number of PCs sold. This year, there will be at least twice smartphones sold as PCs sold.
sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

Very complete overview from Business Insider. Also check out the full slide deck, which can be found here: http://www.businessinsider.com/future-of-mobile-slides-2012-12 ;

 

 

Ending with the following zinger: "Mobile first? ... Only if you want to annoy your customers". More nuanced: the future will not be mobile only, roughly four screen modalities; smartphone, tablet, PC & TV.

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2013 Trends in Data from @Capgemini

2013 Trends in Data from @Capgemini | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it
We are drowning in a sea of data. Data is coming from everything and from everywhere. Whether it is transactions from an ERP system or Point of Sale data from your local supermarket.
sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

I consider the big data movement as fitting under the 'not a desktop' category. Although its applications and implications are manily in the BI domain, it's always good to know more about this stuff. I mean, in web applications we use data all the time as well right? And web api's and HTML5 mean we approach 'real time' (point 2) in web technology as well as 'Do it yourself' (point 3)

 

So read this excellent breakdown of big, bigger ,& biggest data trends in data for 2013, according to the vision of Capgemini. 

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The enduring Apple TV Fantasy

The enduring Apple TV Fantasy | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it

"We all want TV Done Right, free of the Soviet Era set-top box, UI and opaque contracts. We imagine Apple will put all the pieces together. But what’s desirable and “obvious” might not be so simple or soon…"

 

sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

Great article on why Apple will most likely NOT release an Apple TV set in the near future, however much we would like it.

 

Also good notes on the Sony 4K TV effort, which has its content hosted on a local server because Cable and Internet suppliers cannot generate enough bandwith to support file transfer sizes that is needed for this insane resolution.

 

I think if Apple made an iTV or something similar, it would need to be able to blow other sets out of the water in Screen performance, so a Retina 40" display at a minimum. This would need similar media sources as Sony's 4K TV, which in the current market just can't be streamed live into your living room, at least not with the current compression protocols. So either the market has to complete its shift into a higher bandwidth standard (fiber or wireless Hi-speed internet), or a newer, better compression technique, or (even better) both.

 

So yeah, I suspect Apple will "ride it out" for at least a year more until the iMac can evolve into the iTV and become the next big revolution brought to you by Apple. Unless someone else beats them to it.

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display: none; @laurakalbag on sharing knowlegde

It’s good to share what we know. You needn’t be the first, you’ll just help if you’re the first that somebody finds.
sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

Great article, not only explaining the naughtiness in using "display: none;" in responsive design, but also arguing that you shouldn't shy away from explaining things that may seem obvious or simple to you.

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Frustrating change in dutch government web accessibility approach

Frustrating change in dutch government web accessibility approach | The web is not a desktop | Scoop.it
Original site in dutch!
sjoerd kranendonk's insight:

The past week, many people have spoken out against the new approach by the dutch government on web accessibility. The essence bolils down to:

 

No longer a mandatory result (i.e. accessible content) but a mandatory effort (i.e. we spent some budget on some accessibility measures).

 

This results from the new approach of "implement or explain" where government organisations get to explain why they failed to implement certain accessibility measures. Excluded from this are the minimal demands for accessibility.

 

Patient-organisations and accessibility workgroups are appealing to the government to keep accessibility to government information for all citizens a priority.

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