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5 Examples of Sustainable Roof Design Strategies

5 Examples of Sustainable Roof Design Strategies | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

As we move further into the early years of the 21st century, there is a growing consciousness of the need to create more sustainable systems to maintain our society.

 

Natural resources have for too long been exploited and utilized with little regard for posterity. Our cities and towns require large amounts of outside support, but there are many minds coming together to develop new plans and techniques to revitalize our civilization and reduce our environmental impact. One of the major trends leading this movement is to create change from the top down, and make our rooftops pull their weight ecologically and economically.


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Thiet Ke Noi That's comment, May 29, 2013 4:38 AM
http://noithatmodern.com/tin-tuc-&-su-kien/nhung-mau-noi-that-phong-bep-dep-nhat/724.html
ESTAR's curator insight, May 29, 2013 5:58 PM

Los números no mienten, la temperatura del aire puede bajar con techos verdes

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Smart cities: what urban life will be like in 2050

Smart cities: what urban life will be like in 2050 | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

If you work for a young web company, you probably think your office is pretty cool. Maybe it has a pool table or even a roof terrace. Pah! Give it 37 years and, according to engineering company Arup, our office blocks will contain working farms, produce their own energy, be linked together by suspended green walkways and sections of each floor will be removable, upgradable and replaceable. Intersting article on Smart Cities that looks into some of the key innovations by Shell and IBM. 


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Indeed, the floors of Arup’s building occupied by algae-filled biofuel pods are not unlike a current project by French biochemist Pierre Calleja. He is building algae street lamps that eat up CO2 in the atmosphere. Combine this with another algae lamp that produces its own light using energy created by photosynthesis and you get self-powered, anti-pollution street lamps.

 

Researchers at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) just announced their creation of a graphene supercapacitor — essentially a battery but one that charges up to 1,000 times faster than the normal kind, and that can be composted. The future promises instant phone chargers and petrol stations with plugs that can charge cars faster than they currently fill up on unleaded.

 

At last week’s TED conference in LA an architect and computer scientist Skylar Tibbets showed off 4D printing — essentially objects that self-assemble by absorbing water. For Tibbets this material is best used for installing underground water pipes.

 

Robinson is loath to point out the world’s smartest city (he mentions Birmingham as a candidate) but Newton says new cities in emerging markets have the potential to “leapfrog other parts of the world.” 

The real smart aspect may come down not to the technology which we know exists but to foresight and willingness to change.

“There have to be new models of collaboration for businesses and decision-makers in cities and government to have the positive impact we know the technology could support,” says Newton. The city that leads in this department may just end up the smartest in the class.

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Mechanical Walking Space Man's curator insight, March 8, 2013 5:49 AM

Urbane Man… the creative class at work

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NYC Subways Deploy A Touch-Screen Network, Complete With Apps

NYC Subways Deploy A Touch-Screen Network, Complete With Apps | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

The designers at Control Group--have been hired by New York’s MTA to bring a plan for bringing a networked, touch-screen system to their subways. Starting this year, 90 touch-screen kiosks will make their way to thoroughfares like Grand Central Station and hip stops like Bedford Avenue. Together, they’ll make a beta network for 2 million commuters and tourists a day.

 

Each kiosk is a 47-inch touch screen, encapsulated in stainless steel, with an operational temperature up to 200 degrees. They’ll be placed, mostly in pairs, outside pay areas, inside mezzanines and even right on train platforms. Control Group has skinned the hardware with a simple front end and an analytics-heavy backend. And the platform will even support third-party apps approved by the MTA.

 

At launch, the screens will feature all sorts of content, like delays, outages, and, of course, ads (which bring in $100 million in revenue for the MTA each year, but mostly in paper signage). Yet its most powerful interaction for many will likely be its map, which features a one-tap navigation system.

You look at the map, you tap your intended destination, and the map will draw your route, including any transfers along the way. It’s an interface that puts Google Maps to shame.


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THE POWER OF EXTRA SENSORS

 

At the same time, the system’s screens could be the least interesting part of this project. The kiosks will be fitted with extra modules--video cameras, mics, and Wi-Fi--to open up a whole secondary layer of data collection and interface.

 

With cameras and mics, the MTA can enable two-way communication (what I imagine as emergency response messaging), and they can also pull in all sorts of automated metrics from their stations--they’d have eyes capable of counting station crowdedness or even approximate user ethnographics.

Meanwhile, Wi-Fi opens the door for networking a whole platform of mobile users with Internet access and other streamed content. Given that the average person waits 5 to 10 minutes on a platform, O’Donnell sees the potential of engaging, sponsored experiences, like a networked game of Jeopardy, while people wait for the train, or streaming media content, like TV/movie clips. A tourist could, of course, do something far more practical, too, like download a city map in moments.

“We can’t provide Internet for everybody,” he says, “but we can allow interactivity on the platform.”

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James's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:15 AM

Touch interface has seen a rise in the community, such as information booths.

It allows for easy usability and quick access for people in a hurry.

While it does give convenience to the people, it's another job that's been mechanized because of its efficiency.

 

Touchscreens do away with the harder input devices and allow people to use it little to no prior knowledge of how to access it.

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Taiwanese Wind Tower is Covered with Thousands of Wind Turbines and LED Lights #smartcities

Taiwanese Wind Tower is Covered with Thousands of Wind Turbines and LED Lights #smartcities | The urban.NET | Scoop.it
Beijing-based Decode Urbanism Office has designed a tower with a façade composed of multiple wind-driven generators.

 

Thousands of wind turbines will produce enough energy to power the entire building. At night, the diamond-shaped generators are lit with thousands of LED lights incorporated into the building envelope.

The 350-meter (1,150-foot) structure, in Taichung City, China, will house the city’s Department of Urban Development, as well as commercial activities.

The tower’s façade, inspired by the plum blossom — China and Taiwan's  national flower – reacts to changes in direction and intensity of the wind, creating a truly dynamic visual effect. Similarly, mechanical wind power generators have LEDs, illuminating the façade and producing a pulsating flow of light, whose intensity and color adjust to correspond to changes in temperature and season.

 

The wind harnessing capability, along with the lighting that responds to local atmospheric conditions, makes this conceptual tower a true “decoder of nature.”


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Federico Morabito's comment, May 18, 2013 5:41 AM
This is an example of "Smart Progress" is in an effort to channel the interests of research towards evolutionary solutions, through systematic monitoring of the quality process of mental and physical state of the individual with the 'environment.
Edmund Chan's comment, May 19, 2013 12:45 AM
What about routine maintenance ?
Clem Stanyon's comment, May 30, 2013 11:17 PM
Fantastic!
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12 Fresh Ideas for Transforming the Places We Live With Open Data

12 Fresh Ideas for Transforming the Places We Live With Open Data | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

A few of the 886 proposals from the Knight Foundation's latest open government news challenge.

 

This year, the Knight News Challenge has been soliciting project proposals to open and leverage government data anywhere at the national, state and local levels (in the U.S. and abroad). As of last week, 886 projects are vying for a share of the $5 million in funding, all in response to this question: "How can we make the places we live more awesome through data and technology?"

 

Amid all of the submissions are innovations we've already encountered at Atlantic Cities: a favorite guerrilla wayfinding campaign from Raleigh, North Carolina; Code for America's playful StreetMix web app; the San Francisco-based Urban Prototyping Festival; and a community-driven transportation planning project based on the kind of data analytics we wrote about here. But that's barely scratching the surface of all the proposals that Knight has corralled.

Visit the article link for a list of 12 ideas from the competition that are new and worth developing (with the applicants' description of their programs). On the 29th, Knight plans to announce a set of semifinalists, who will be invited to complete more detailed proposals. The final winners (there's no predetermined number of them) will then be announced in June...


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Lauren Moss's curator insight, April 1, 2013 4:06 PM

Innovative ideas on how to utilize open data and communication technology to enhance communities, engage citizens and empower local governments in a variety of ways...

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Case Study in Efficiency: SOM's Diagonal Tower in South Korea

Case Study in Efficiency:  SOM's Diagonal Tower in South Korea | The urban.NET | Scoop.it

SOM’s Diagonal Tower in Yongsan International Business District of Seoul, South Korea, is a case study in efficiency – the 343 meter tall tower successfully minimizes wind loads, reduces construction costs, provides dramatic views and meets strict energy codes by integrating massing, structure and performance.

 

The design of this landmark skyscraper, with glazed triangular facets, employs passive environmental control strategies within and on the façade – sunshades are positioned at varying angles on each building exposure, mitigating heat gain in the summer and permitting direct sunlight to warm the building’s interiors during the cold winter months. Triple pane glazed exterior curtain wall decreases energy loss, while active chilled beam system surpasses traditional air driven systems, using water as a medium for transferring heating and cooling energy, which results in less energy consumption along with great environmental comfort for building users...

 


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Natalie Curtis's curator insight, March 22, 2013 9:10 AM

A really interesting and amazing building. Very self sufficient and really quite fascinating. It's enery-efficient and great to look at simultaneously.

Kang ji yun 's curator insight, May 25, 2013 11:59 PM

It is very wonderful building!! when it comes to the diagonal tower, it serves more than visual stimuli. Even though the Diagonal Tower is similar to Norman Foster's Hearst Tower in New York, it's megaframe reduces the amount of steel required by over 25% when compared to conventionally framed buildings.

Amelia's comment, May 26, 2013 9:59 AM
I hope we have one also in Daejeon.. hehe..